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View Full Version : Yes Virginia, Santa is a Confederate



pvt t a white
12-07-2006, 03:08 PM
Again it will be that time of year again where Santa will be flying house to house bringing joy and happiness to children of all ages every where. Santa’s trip although not a matter of national security, his trip will be monitored by NORAD and you too can monitor his midnight ride by going to www.noradsanta.org. To keep the Yankees on their toes and scratchin’ thar heads, Santa pretends to start his midnight ride from the North Pole, but as every school boy and girl knows, the trip begins at South Pole. Santa leaves the South Pole traveling throughout the Southern Hemisphere then travels north along the International Date Line to confuse them Yankees, thus, giving the impression that his trip started up North some where.

So, how does this confirm that Santa is a Confederate? By his uniform and sleigh of course! Equipped and assisted by Confederate Artillery units under the supervision of Colonel E. Porter Alexander, Chief of Artillery, Santa was given a uniform from the Artillery corps and quietly changed it from gray with red piping to Red with white piping. His sleigh was a converted caisson. Research also indicates that the eight reindeer were brought over from Southern Norway on a blockade runner.

As you settle down for that long winters nap just remember that the rebel yell you hear in the middle of the night was not in your dreams but coming from your rooftop. Merry Christmas to all and Y’all have a good night – ya hear!

Pvt T A White

flattop32355
12-07-2006, 03:55 PM
I was never aware that "Ho Ho Ho!" was the rebel yell.

CapitolGuards
12-07-2006, 05:31 PM
Santa Claus comes to us from the Dutch tradition of St. Nicholas, the patron saint of children and numerous other occupations. His name in Dutch, “Sint Niklaas” or sometimes “Sinter Claes” became “Santa Claus” to American tongues. St. Nicholas was said to visit children on Christmas morning and leave gifts in the shoes of good children. St. Nicholas had a helper, “Black Peter,” whose job was to leave switches and lumps of coal for bad or lazy children, or in the case of especially ill-behaved children, to abduct them to some disagreeable place.

Santa first became widely popular in America in a poem published anonymously in 1823, titled A Visit From St. Nicholas. Some 20 years later, the poem’s author acknowledged himself as Clement C. Moore, of New York. (Note: New York City!!) Moore had composed the poem for his children based upon the Dutch stories of St. Nicholas and the experience of driving home in his sleigh with gifts for his children. He recited the poem to his children each Christmas, and gave an unsigned copy to a lady friend who in turn sent it to the state newspaper for publication. Moore was deeply embarrassed by the publication of his poem, and did not admit that he wrote it until 1844.

The popular image of Santa as a “jolly old elf” comes from Moore’s poem, but even more especially from a series of drawings and cartoons by Thomas Nast, an illustrator for Harper’s Weekly, a national news magazine. Nast was a devout Unionist, and in 1862 he first drew Santa Claus for the readers of Harper’s Weekly, as Santa, dressed in a suit prominantly featuring the red, white and blue of the Stars and Stripes, delivered Christmas packages to Federal soldiers. Santa made an annual Christmas appearance in Harper’s after that, always as a Union supporter. President Abraham Lincoln commented about Nast’s Santa as “the best recruiting sergeant the North ever had.”

Santa’s Unionist tendencies predominated throughout the War. It is noted that he is alleged to have run the blockade to Southern children on several occasions, and as described in the the novel Santa Claus and General Lee to Southern soldiers on at least one Christmas. However unlike Harper’s, Santa Claus and General Lee is clearly a work of fiction and Secessionist propaganda.

It should also be specifically noted that Santa Claus later moved his residence to and established his toy workshop at the North Pole in 1866 in an effort to avoid the politics of Reconstruction and prevent either side from claiming him as their own. For the past hundred and forty years since, children's letters continue to be addressed to and received by Santa at the North Pole.

He's a damnYankee, right down to his red britches, white fur, and toes turned blue in the cold.

Tom

(any facts that may accidentally appear in this argument were lifted from and may be verified in Kevin Rawling's 1995 book, We Were Marching on Christmas Day...)

sbl
12-07-2006, 05:34 PM
From Russian CW buffs...

http://stonewall.hut.ru/images/ConfederateSanta.JPG

Confederate Santa...

http://www.south-art.com/PAINTINGS/SANTAS_WORKSHOP_-_f.jpg


Does Santa have a Pillow under his coat?

http://www.pillowpa.org/GeneralPillow2.jpg


Is there a Civil War on Christmas?

Huck Finn
12-07-2006, 09:20 PM
St. Nicholas lived on the southern coast of present day Turkey, in the third century. His feast day is December 6th.

http://www.stnicholascenter.org/Brix?pageID=38

Having an RC around, as my Irish friends refer to me, can be handy.

Pete K
12-08-2006, 11:49 AM
St. Nicholas bishop of Mercia, early saint of both the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. St. Nicholas was said to have purchsed the freedom of three sisters who were about to be sold as prostitutes because their father was in deep debt. Obviously this makes St. Nick an abolitionist in practice, thus having Northern tendencies even in the later Roamn Empire long, long before the American Civil War.

Huck Finn
12-08-2006, 04:34 PM
Peter:

Great name, BTW. The Orthodox Churches did not exist in the time of St. Nicholas. He was a good Roman Catholic.

We embrace our Orthodox brothers and share much. St. Nicholas, as I was taught from a child, remains a highly venerated person of history by many religions.

As my friend from East Tennesse would say "This is a good thing."

rebel yell
12-09-2006, 01:43 PM
I was never aware that "Ho Ho Ho!" was the rebel yell.

When Santa comes to my house he goes "Whooh Whooo Whoooey":D

flattop32355
12-09-2006, 02:37 PM
When Santa comes to my house he goes "Whooh Whooo Whoooey":D

Your children must be leaving him cookies and moonshine.

tompritchett
12-09-2006, 06:13 PM
Your children must be leaving him cookies and moonshine.

A true Southern tradition (although good old Kentucky bourbon is also acceptable for moonshine) :)

MStuart
12-09-2006, 06:24 PM
When Santa comes to my house he goes "Whooh Whooo Whoooey":D

That doesn't sound like Santa as much as it sounds like Ric Flair..............

To be "The Man", you gotta beat "The Man"................Woooooooooooo!!!!!!

Mark

rebel yell
12-09-2006, 08:08 PM
Your children must be leaving him cookies and moonshine.
Why do you think his cheeks are red and he's so jolly!:D

tompritchett
12-10-2006, 12:57 AM
The Orthodox Churches did not exist in the time of St. Nicholas. He was a good Roman Catholic.

At this time in Christian history there were neither Orthodox or Roman Catholic churches. Rather each region had their own senior church elders or bishops who lived in major centers of the time - Rome, Antioch, Jerusalem, Alexandria and other places. It was not until very late in the history of the Roman empire when Pope Leo the First somehow persuaded Attila the Hun to abandon his conquest of Italy that the Roman church started to gain primacy over the other bishops within Christianity. This resulted in the ultimate schism in the church that resulted in the Eastern Orthodox churchs and the Roman Catholic church. Prior to that Schism, there was neither as was evidenced in the Council of Nicaea in AD 325, where all the bishops, including Nicholas, met to find a common ground of beliefs for all Christianity as it existed then.

sbl
12-10-2006, 08:21 AM
A true Southern tradition (although good old Kentucky bourbon is also acceptable for moonshine) :)



Lobsters and maple syrup.

tompritchett
12-10-2006, 09:21 AM
Lobsters and maple syrup.

But not as fun. Have you ever seen a Santa walk after visiting the 10th house where he has been given bourbon :)

Pete K
12-11-2006, 07:48 AM
Here we go into another era of historic discussion. the Eastern and Western branches of Chiristianity offically split in 1054 with what has been called the Great Schism. There were many differences and disagrreements over dogma and the order of the Mass/Great Litergy, but the main disagreement was over the authority of the Pope/Patriarchs. "The Petrine theory" of Papal infailabilty. The Crusade of 1204 really split the church when Crusaders funded by Ventian merchants sacked and looted Constantinople. (This could start a great flame war, moderators forgive me!) Recently the Pope and Patriarch lifted the excommunications of the eleventh century so technically the churces are "reuniting", but ten centuries of spilt is not going to end soon, just like 140 years of split opinoin somewhere else...

Happy Holidays/ Merry Christmas

Wounded_Zouave
12-11-2006, 12:37 PM
Someone call Bill O'Reilly. His "Most Ridiculous Item of the Day" topic is right here.

tompritchett
12-11-2006, 01:20 PM
Someone call Bill O'Reilly. His "Most Ridiculous Item of the Day" topic is right here.

Which the Santa in a Confederate or the discussion of the splitting of the early church into the Orthodox and Roman Catholic churchs?

No_Know_Nothings
12-11-2006, 03:25 PM
:rolleyes: Those red pants.... that white lining around the cap.... Santa was obviously a 5th New York Zouave: http://www.sma.shs.nebo.edu/salon03/images/whitaker%20zouave%20exp.jpg

Spare_Man
12-11-2006, 03:32 PM
;)
:rolleyes: Those red pants.... that white lining around the cap.... Santa was obviously a 5th New York Zouave: http://www.sma.shs.nebo.edu/salon03/images/whitaker%20zouave%20exp.jpg

I think you may be right. That stand at 2nd Manassas obviosly took a toll on him... turned his hair snow white. :shock:

sbl
12-11-2006, 05:00 PM
Say...That's a real nice image. I can't read the signiture. Who painted it?

redleggeddevil
12-11-2006, 09:30 PM
I believe that it can be conclusively proven that Santa is a Southron. The proof can be found in the film "Gettysburg", where Jolly Old Saint Nick can be seen early in the film, serving as a picket in the Confederate lines.

Not a primary source, admittedly, but as close to certain as we can be at this remove.

Rob Weaver
12-11-2006, 11:01 PM
Perhaps it was in the War, then that Santa lost his leg. As Moore's poem clearly states, "He was clothed all in fur from his head to his foot" Foot, not feet. But wait, Moore's poem was 40 years old by then. Perhaps Santa was an 1812 veteran?

tompritchett
12-12-2006, 04:06 AM
Perhaps Santa was an 1812 veteran?

Are you trying to imply that Santa was one of those Redcoats that burned DC?

sbl
12-12-2006, 06:29 AM
Santa Claus did conquer the Martians.

Santa Claus Conquers the Martians (1964)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058548/

Rob Weaver
12-12-2006, 06:59 AM
No, not at all. Maybe he was a musician.They wore reversed colors. After all, another reputable source contains the detail: "little tin horns, and little toy drums ... Santa Claus is coming to town."

redleggeddevil
12-12-2006, 09:42 AM
No, not at all. Maybe he was a musician.They wore reversed colors. After all, another reputable source contains the detail: "little tin horns, and little toy drums ... Santa Claus is coming to town."

Rob--

Now you have me questioning my earlier conclusion that Santa is a Southerner. Perhaps there are hints scattered throughout popular culture, sort of like "The DaVinci Code", pointing to Santa's true leanings.

You mention "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town", which might have served as a warning to Southern cities in the path of Sherman's bummers. This would tie it in with some other Christmas classics as well. Perhaps the original lyrics were "Do You Fear What I Fear?" and it doesn't take much to imagine hearing "Charleston's Roasting When We Open Fire".

Perhaps your notation that Santa only had one leg points to him being Dan Sickles in disguise...

There is a doctoral dissertation in this for sure!

sbl
12-12-2006, 11:51 AM
As for Santa being a Confederate. Does he PAY those elves?

:twisted:

Malingerer
12-12-2006, 01:55 PM
Now Scott,
Any "unpleasantness" that may exist has nothing to elvin servitude. Why can't you yankees simply understand that this fight is for our "polar rights".
Merry Chrstmas,

Peter Julius,
Bryson City, NC

sbl
12-12-2006, 02:04 PM
....I'll remember that.

"Have a good one!" (My Yankee non-commital, all purpose holiday greeting.)

sbl
12-12-2006, 02:06 PM
Say...That's a real nice image. I can't read the signiture. Who painted it?

Who did paint that image?

Spare_Man
12-12-2006, 02:34 PM
The painting was done by William Whitaker. He's primarily a portraitist and not a regular historical artist. Whitaker's website is here: http://www.williamwhitaker.com/

sbl
12-12-2006, 03:27 PM
Thank's John,

I really like this artist's work! I like some of Rocco and Troiani, Waterhouse, and Neary's art.

I haven't seen William Whitaker's work before. It does look like a portrait rather than a uniform plate.

Rob Weaver
12-12-2006, 04:10 PM
Perhaps there are hints scattered throughout popular culture, sort of like "The DaVinci Code", pointing to Santa's true leanings.

"Jolly old Saint Nickolas, lean your ear this way/ Don't you tell a single soul what I'm going to say/ Christmas Eve is coming soon, now you dear old man/ whisper what you'll bring to me, tell me if you can."

Clearly alludes to espionage: 1) a pseudonymn "St Nickolas" 2) an admonition to transmit secret data 3) a cryptic message. That leaves us with the sobriquet "Jolly." We all know that's descended from a French word "Joli;" "Jolie Rouge" becomes "Jolly Roger" (You as a Floridian know that.) The famous black flag figured even in guerilla activity during the War. Perhaps we have here a warning about a partisan raid?

MStuart
12-12-2006, 04:26 PM
As for Santa being a Confederate. Does he PAY those elves?

:twisted:

No need for pay or anything like that........they like where they are and how they are.

Mark

jthlmnn
12-12-2006, 07:16 PM
Gentlemen,
Have your research skills abandoned you? I am shocked, shocked I say, at the repeated references to Mr. Moore as the author of "A Visit From St. Nick." Moore's authorship is dubious, at best, and fraudulent, at worst. Over the years I've seen and read many pieces regarding the matter. The most convenient and entertaining summary arguing for Mr. Livingston as the true author can be found at:

http://www.iment.com/maida/familytree/henry/xmas/
(Lots of great Santa Pictures!)
Oh, by the way, while many issues pitted Eastern Christians against Western Christians, the one that had them acting like Christians trying to get out of the parking lot after Sunday services was the addition of the "filioque clause" to the Nicene Creed.