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snk22nd
12-04-2006, 06:40 PM
Just wondering if anyone new what type of material was used to make this badges? I am sure there was more than type of material. Just wondering what what most common.Thanks

Frenchie
12-04-2006, 07:00 PM
The orders specifying the shape and color of corps badges said "cloth". Officers and wealthy enlisted men sometimes had them made with gilt lacing on the edges or made of painted metal with pin backs.

http://howardlanham.tripod.com/linkgr3/link151.html

westcoastcampaigner
12-04-2006, 07:01 PM
Scott,

The originals I've seen look to be made out of a kersey or wool material. Go with that and keep away from the cheap felt ones with the sticky peel on the back for easy attachment to your cap. You'll get a whole lot more out of sewing a corps badge on to your cap the way it would have been done. If you find yourself getting frustrated trying to sew it on and you only need it to be on your cap temporarily, use a straight pin. Good luck.

Josh Sawyer
Liberty Rifles

Hardtimes
12-04-2006, 07:10 PM
I use a curved needle that I keep in my housewife to sew on the various corps badges required for different federal impressions at authentic events. It makes it much easier.
A source for great badges of both the officer & enlisted type is
B.J. Zirkle
IWP Fabrications
GiltWire@aol.com

After the event I save the badges as a reminder of the experience and possible use again. One thing I would avoid is painting any one corps badge on ones canteen, it limits the impression one can do.
Regards,
Bill O'Dea
Salt Boiler mess (http://www.rugglesrag.com/salt_boiler_mess.htm)
Syracuse NY

bill watson
12-04-2006, 07:18 PM
A reminder that after the initial period of resentment passed (corps badges were initially to help officers tell when men were absent from their proper command), many men took a great deal of pride in their particular badge and corps. One of my favorite stories is how the 7th NJVI, when the III Corps was disbanded 1863-64 and they were put in the II corps, initially refused to put on the new corps badge and, when ordered to do it or face the consequences, sewed it to the seat of their pants. Today we'd call that vicious compliance. :-) There had been a lot of resentment against the II Corps ever since Hancock took credit for winning the fight at Williamsburg just by showing up after Hooker's division, which would be one of the III Corps divisions later, had bled themselves out fighting all day long on the spot. Seems like Hancock arrived with a retinue of reporters.... Hooker quickly learned that trick, but meanwhile, a rivalry was born.
Other units faced with transfers between corps simply kept the old badges and sewed the new ones on top, cut down so both showed. I remember seeing a Minnesota regiment replicate that at an 1864 event a few years back, and in addition to just looking cool, it gives an instant opening for living history questions from spectators. I think, but I'm not sure, that they had a red circle, First Corps, first Division, under a green trefoil, fourth division, second corps.
It adds immensely to events when the organizers think to have participants all wear the same corps badge, and also provide them. That's been a feature of the Recon events. Seems like a corps badge, for the Union guys at least, might be a better "registration pass" than a medallion or something, at least for 1863 onward events.

Jim Mayo
12-04-2006, 09:32 PM
I have some examples here about half way down the page:

http://www.angelfire.com/ma4/j_mayo/relics.html

Huck Finn
12-04-2006, 09:58 PM
Jim:

You must have some sort of rabbit in that big old stove pipe hat. BTW, your web site is first rate and a real source.

tompritchett
12-04-2006, 11:48 PM
You must have some sort of rabbit in that big old stove pipe hat.

Reminds me of Bullwinkle's hat. You could pull just about anything out of it. :)

Rob Weaver
12-05-2006, 07:41 AM
that they had a red circle, First Corps, first Division, under a green trefoil, fourth division, second corps.

You're mostly right. Wadsworth's division of the I Corps became the 4th division of the V Corps after the I Corps was disbanded in the winter of 1863-1864. The red circle of the I was superimposed on the green Maltese cross of the V. The Iron Brigade incorporated that design into their veteran's badges after the war. I'm not sure that it was done during the war, though. There was a lot of respect for the I Corps, and the IB specifically. My understanding is that the I Corps was allowed to continue to wear the red circle simply out of that esteem.
One thing I dislike seeing is the practice of tacking a Corps badge on your hat with any old sharp thing lying around: a pin, needle, nail, nipple pick, thornapple sticker, etc. First of all, soldiers stand regular inspections for the purpose of ensuring that they look like soldiers. That wouldn't fly. Second, those men were proud of those badges and the espirit de corps they represented. I've never seen a surviving example that wasn't carefully attached to the article of clothing to which it was fastened.

bill watson
12-05-2006, 08:54 AM
Thanks! Yes, that's what I saw. :-)

BobSullivanPress
12-05-2006, 09:34 AM
It adds immensely to events when the organizers think to have participants all wear the same corps badge, and also provide them. That's been a feature of the Recon events. Seems like a corps badge, for the Union guys at least, might be a better "registration pass" than a medallion or something, at least for 1863 onward events.

In 1977, I was invited to a company-sized (50 participants) living history event held on the grounds of Spotsylvania Battlefield, The scenario was that we were a company of the 1st Maryland, our enlistments were up, and the army was trying to get us to re-enlist by pulling us out of the march to North Anna and letting us camp for a day or two.

The invitation was a Civil War draft notice. While there, we were issued discharge papers and (if we reenlisted), enlistment forms. Because we were representing the 1st Maryland (2nd Division, Fifth Corps), our "confirmation notice" was a white wool Maltese Cross, which we were to sew onto our caps. I still have that corps badge, and that simple event remains one of the best living history events I ever attended.

Read the year again: 1977.

skamikaze
12-05-2006, 10:42 AM
the only thing i dislike about my corps badge is that since we are first division, sixth corps (a red greek cross) every spectator out there always asks the same question: "so, are you guys like, the hosiptal corps or the Red Cross?"

it does give a great opportunity to expalin purpose of corps badges though.