PDA

View Full Version : Help on a revolver question



Richard Schimenti
11-11-2006, 06:29 PM
I recently purchased a replica of the Schneider and Glassick Confederate revolver. While the revolver was previously owned, it was never shot.

i have noticed that there is some play in the cylinder, front to back (towards the breech and hammer) The movement is not excessive, but enough to notice when you lower or raise the gun.

I have shot it with powder and cream of wheat, and there was no problem whatsoever. I was concerned about chain fire, but that was not the case. It is not my intention to use it for anything else other than using on the field during a re-enactment


I did take it to a local gun shop and I was told that the play was because of the droop of the brass frame.

Is there anything that can be done with this problem or am I concerned over nothing.

This is the first Colt style revolver i have owned, my other two are replica Remingtons.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Richard Schimenti, 2nd Kentucky Cav. Co. D

John1862
11-11-2006, 06:50 PM
I own a Colt 1860 Army, and let me tell you, it was problem after problem untill I decided not to use it anymore :p. Anyhow, do you mean the smitty told you the problem was that the brass frame is bent or misformed?

VaTrooper
11-11-2006, 07:08 PM
Richard,
I wouldnt be too concerned as long as your not planning on live firing it. I use a Colt Navy and fill up the cylinder about 3/4 the way up with powder then I fill it the rest of the way with cream of wheat, pack it down, then top off again with cream of wheat and I cant recall ever having a chamber fire. But if your worried about it you can always rub on a layer of bore butter too.

Richard Schimenti
11-12-2006, 12:22 AM
John, It was a gun salesman, not a smitty who said that the frame bent becauise of the weight on it. It did not sound too plausable to me, but i could not argue with him.

Liek the other poster stated, since i will only use it to make smoke and noise, i hope all will be well, otherwise it is on the wall it goes.

Dave Myrick
11-12-2006, 11:16 AM
A question, with this front to back movement you note, what is the position of the hammer? Is the hammer in full cock? If not, it is nothing to worry about. If the hammer is back to full cock, then it would be either the cylinder lock or the notch in the cylinder are worn.
Dave

Richard Schimenti
11-12-2006, 04:29 PM
The front to back play is at full cock and when the hammer is down. It is not a severe movement, just enough to notice.

the revoler was previously owned but never fired. I do not intend to do any live fire with it other than powder and cream of wheat.

I was concerned about chain fires, but i have tested it and there seemed to be no problem with that aspect.

I have two other revolvers both in the Remington style. This is the first Colt type I have owned and i have no other to compare it too, and that is what raised the question if it was normal "play" or a problem with the firearm.

Frenchie
11-12-2006, 09:38 PM
Confederate copy of the 1851 Colt Navy. Brass frame. Never been fired. Salesman said the weight of the steel barrel was pulling the base pin (cylinder arbor) out of the frame? Let me phrase this as delicately as I can... B*** S***! I'd believe a stretched frame if it had fired 500 to 1000 full-house live rounds, especially if they were oversize round balls (.385-.390). However, if the movement isn't more than, say, .01 inch, I wouldn't worry about it. If it's just enough to notice but no worse, it's probably okay. Was it imported by High Standard or Gander Mountain?

Chain firing: The popular notion is that chain firing is caused when the flash from the fired cylinder sets off the charge in adjacent cylinders by getting past loose-fitting bullets, wads, or whatever is in the front of the cylinders. Au contraire, the most frequent cause of chain fires is at the back of the cylinder, when loose-fitting percussion caps fall off during handling or recoil or are loose enough to allow cap flash to get into the cylinder. Light mainsprings that allow the hammer to bounce up from back-pressure don't help the problem.

White Horse
11-12-2006, 09:43 PM
I have shot it with powder and cream of wheat, and there was no problem whatsoever. I was concerned about chain fire, but that was not the case. It is not my intention to use it for anything else other than using on the field during a re-enactment
I believe that studies have shown most chain fires are from the caps being improperly fitted rather than from the chamber mouth.




I did take it to a local gun shop and I was told that the play was because of the droop of the brass frame.
Not likely unless the frame was incorrect to begin with. I have several brass frame Colt type revolvers that are 15 years old and have literally thousands of rounds fired through them, thay have spend countless hours in my holsters and been carried many hundred miles with out "drooping". I would not live fire them how ever.

cavsgt
11-13-2006, 09:08 AM
Richard
The info about chain fire is right on, the use of #11 caps which have to be pinched to use cause most of the problem. This is normally a colt problem and has been around for years. If the problem is in the cylinder pin and you will not live fire epoxy it in.
Phill

Richard Schimenti
11-13-2006, 09:16 AM
Gentlemen, thank you for the help

Richard Schimenti