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View Full Version : Artillery in action - Original photos



redlegger1
06-02-2011, 10:25 PM
Was wondering what photos may be out there showing period artillery in "action" (action as in the photo at least not being of the portrait variety of a group, but of the men manning the guns). Thought this would be helpful in seeing period posture of the various positions.
For example:
http://npsfrsp.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/battery-of-32-pounders-fredericksburg-may-3-1863-smaller-file.jpg

and
http://npsfrsp.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/first-connecticut-battery-fredericksburg-may-2-1863-russell-smaller-file.jpg

Details of the above:
http://npsfrsp.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/battery-of-32-pounders-fredericksburg-may-3-1863-cropped-on-first-gun.jpg

http://npsfrsp.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/first-connecticut-battery-fredericksburg-may-2-1863-russell-cropped-on-two-gun-crews.jpg

redlegger1
06-02-2011, 10:28 PM
http://npsfrsp.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/first-connecticut-battery-fredericksburg-may-2-1863-cropped-on-three-men-with-corps-badges.jpg

Jeffrey Cohen
06-02-2011, 11:12 PM
The bottom picture os 1st NY Ind. Batt. also known as Winslow's Battery.

Bill_Cross
06-03-2011, 11:46 AM
Jeff, you're liable to wait a long time to see many. "Action" photos in the ACW are hard to find because the photographic technology was so bulky and cumbersome. Anyone who has had an image struck by a modern Amrbotype or tintype photographer has seen the large set-up, fussy chemicals and often the need to "do over." Long exposure times of the film emulsion meant that any movement would result in blurring as these photos attest.

Matthew Brady and others who went to the battles didn't usually get there until all the action was over. I don't believe they followed the armies for the most part, either.

redlegger1
06-03-2011, 12:12 PM
Jeff, you're liable to wait a long time to see many. "Action" photos in the ACW are hard to find because the photographic technology was so bulky and cumbersome. Anyone who has had an image struck by a modern Amrbotype or tintype photographer has seen the large set-up, fussy chemicals and often the need to "do over." Long exposure times of the film emulsion meant that any movement would result in blurring as these photos attest.

Matthew Brady and others who went to the battles didn't usually get there until all the action was over. I don't believe they followed the armies for the most part, either.

Agreed, action as in actually working the gun in battle, drill, etc. is out of the equation because of the photographic limitations of the time, but 'action' as in photos of the artillerymen manning the gun in a working manner even it is posing for the camera per se as in the above shots are helpful.

Jeffrey Cohen
06-03-2011, 10:32 PM
Winslow's Battery has this photo. The head of Winslow's is an advanced collector and recognized canon expert.

mississippian
06-04-2011, 07:49 PM
Love the III corps badges on the sides of the forage caps in the 3rd picture.

Will MacDonald

Boyd Miles
06-04-2011, 09:09 PM
A lot more hat brass than you would expect, no pistols, not sure if there are any belts being worn by anyone other than those on horseback. About as close to an action photo as you can get for the time.

brown30741
06-04-2011, 09:14 PM
My digital copy of the 1864 Ringgold, GA photo was on a computer that crashed. Anybody got that one?

redlegger1
06-04-2011, 09:30 PM
The bottom picture os 1st NY Ind. Batt. also known as Winslow's Battery.

Are you sure on that; I only ask because the original photo from the library of congress site lists it as the First Connecticut Battery http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/ppmsca.07269/

Clayton
06-05-2011, 04:12 AM
Really great images. Thanks for posting.

Clayton

moconfed
06-11-2011, 09:41 AM
To add to the image of the Connecticut battery. I recently saw it in a book titled 'Brady's Civil War' (a compilation of his images, etc.), and it captions the image with the following:
"This is believed to be the first actual photograph of the US army in combat. It was made under fire by Matthew Brady at the battle of Frdericksburg, Virginia, in 1863. Toward the end of the four second exposure time, the cannon roared. causing Brady's camera stand to shake, such that blurring of the image occured, especially of the mounted officer on the right."