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Micah Trent
11-07-2006, 05:14 PM
I was discussing today with a friend of mine about ways soldiers were treated for stomach problems...screamers...sour apple trots...whatever you want to call it. My friend mentioned that Ipecac was used quite often and possibly opium. We questioned the opium however not knowing for sure if it was modern war or post war.
Do any of you all use these items in your impression or use something to subsitute for it?
Any help would be great!

Micah Trent

TimKindred
11-07-2006, 07:23 PM
I was discussing today with a friend of mine about ways soldiers were treated for stomach problems...screamers...sour apple trots...whatever you want to call it. My friend mentioned that Ipecac was used quite often and possibly opium. We questioned the opium however not knowing for sure if it was modern war or post war.
Do any of you all use these items in your impression or use something to subsitute for it?
Any help would be great!

Micah Trent


Comrade,

Yes, it was a quite common preparation, also known as "Dover's Powder". Although the link below is to an 1898 pharmacopia, it's the same medication,

http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/kings/cephaelis_pulv.html

Opium could be used either in pill or powder form, and was occasionally known to be included in various syrups. Ipecac could be found in both powdered form as well as a syrup, and also blended into pills with other ingrediants.

The best simulation of opium pills to date is a large brown peppercorn, lightly spritzed and dusted with cinnamon, or a similar dark-brown powder.

Powdered opium may be simulated with powdered instant coffee, powdered Postum, or powdered beef bullion. In any case, it should be more or less the consistancy of flour. It's easiest to prepare with a mortar and pestal.

Ipecac may also be simulated with a light brown, or reddish brown powder. I've had good luck using a mix of Postum, cinnamon, and red crystal sugar worked well with a mortar and pestal.

Dover's Powder could be either a light brownish or tannish color, even almost an ecru, depending upon the preparation.

Either way, the staples of the day included Opium, Ipecac, Morphine, Blue Mass, Camphor, Creosote, Syrup of Squill, Ether, Chloroform and Alcohol.

Those are probably the most prescribed medicines, although there were some 50+ in the Federal issue Pannier. CS prescriptions would be identical, the amounts based simply on availability, or substitute medicines made locally.

Respects,

Linda Trent
11-07-2006, 07:42 PM
I was discussing today with a friend of mine about ways soldiers were treated for stomach problems...screamers...sour apple trots...whatever you want to call it. My friend mentioned that Ipecac was used quite often and possibly opium. We questioned the opium however not knowing for sure if it was modern war or post war.


Hi Micah,

According to Keith Imray's "Modern Domestic Medicine," 1850...

"Opium: Stimulant and Narcotic. It's most common applications re to allay pain, to tranquilize the nervous system, and to produce sleep. Small doses act as stimulant, larger doses act as sedatice and causes sleep. It generally causes constipation, and in chronic diarrheas it is much employed to relieve the pain and check the discharge..."

Linda.

Micah Trent
11-11-2006, 04:30 PM
Thank you all for the advice. It helped answer some questions. Again thanks!

Micah Trent