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Pistolero
03-04-2006, 11:58 PM
Hello,
I was told that no one makes authentic CW naval hammocks anymore. It is hard to believe that in this day of reenacting/living history, aunthenticity requirements, and growing interest in CW naval history etc, that someone out there would be offering them! It would seem to me that anyone wanting to portray a naval guy would want one in his issue or kit. I wish someone offered them.
Take care,
Dave

Union Navy
03-09-2006, 02:40 PM
I'm not sure how accurate this would be. I have yet to see documentation that shows sailors brought their hammocks ashore, nor was there any mention of them in launch or cutter equipment, which is how sailors would have gotten ashore. The vast majority of naval reenactors don't have a ship to sling their hammock on anyways. What little documentation I have seen leads me to believe shore parties that stayed ashore overnight either slept campaign or used what the army offered them. Any use of hammocks off ship seems to have been quite rare.

Ronnn
05-28-2008, 11:35 AM
We have some Hammocks in the mockup of the U.S.S. Hartford at the Columbus Civil War Naval Museum. They really aren't that much different from the Hemp Hammocks one can buy on Ebay. I can also tell ya, I'd rather sleep on rocky ground than in one of these hammocks for a night, really!



http://cgi.ebay.com/Genuine-Hemp-Rope-Hammock-Large_W0QQitemZ360000881715QQihZ023QQcategoryZ2071 9QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItemQQ_trksidZp1 638Q2em118Q2el1247

GaWildcat
05-28-2008, 12:53 PM
Ok, being an Army type, both real and CW, I may be out of my depth here, but a
quick search brought up a few things on hammocks. http://www.seasidehammocks.com/Naval+Hammock-sp36.html Describes the hammock, and how to lash up the thing. It describes it as being of Canvas, not hemp with sixteen (16) grommets at each end. The description dates to the US Navy of WWII but seems to be the same as a sealed pattern from HMS Richmond in 1775 http://www.hmsrichmond.org/hamock.htm. It is my guess (and only a guess being a landlubber) that hammocks in the US and CS Navies would be fairly similar in make up and use.

I apologize if incorrect, but just my guess.

GaWildcat
05-28-2008, 01:24 PM
From Harper's Weekly Aug 19, 1865

After passing the examination before the surgeon and instructors, the paymaster furnishes the apprentice for immediate use with the following articles of clothing : One pea-jacket, cloth cap, pair of cloth trousers, flannel over and under shirts, pair of drawers, shoes, neck-tie, socks, white duck pants and frock, comb, knife, pot, pan, and spoon, one bar soap, clothes-bag, and a badge. The boy is then taken to the ship's corporal, who assists him in the transformation from a landsman to a sailor-boy. Next the sailmaker furnishes him with a hammock —his bed until of age. Then the master-at-arms places him in a mess, and, at the same time, gives him a printed form, on which is registered his number, that of his bag and hammock, a list of his clothing, and points out the place v here he is to swing his hammock. Each boy has a number given to him when he enlists, and he retains that number as long as he is an apprentice.

cjdaley
05-28-2008, 02:19 PM
It's my understanding that one project given to new/young sailors would be to make their own hammock. This would give them a practical exercise on knot tying and rope splicing. I suggest doing research on how to make one, then making one yourself and NOT buying one if you want to really be a sailor.

Ronnn
05-28-2008, 02:41 PM
Ok, being an Army type, both real and CW, I may be out of my depth here, but a
quick search brought up a few things on hammocks. http://www.seasidehammocks.com/Naval+Hammock-sp36.html Describes the hammock, and how to lash up the thing. It describes it as being of Canvas, . . . . that hammocks in the US and CS Navies would be fairly similar in make up and use.

That crossed my mind not long after I posted . . .well DANG! Yea, they're canvas . . . I'm pretty sure . . . on the Hartford Mockup. I used to have a photographic memory . . . . but some light leaked in on the film one day when I was being open-minded. :oops:

Ronnn
05-29-2008, 09:50 AM
It's my understanding that one project given to new/young sailors would be to make their own hammock. This would give them a practical exercise on knot tying and rope splicing. I suggest doing research on how to make one, then making one yourself and NOT buying one if you want to really be a sailor.


Or . . . if you don't have the time or the gumption, if you can find one . . . go ahead and buy it, with no apologies. Really being a sailor has little to do with reenacting. (though it can help!) We're just playing sailor, so accuracy is more important than how you actually acquire it. Cool if you can make it yourself though!

(And while some sailors surely made their own hammocks, I believe they were issued, for the most part)

Lightningslinger
05-29-2008, 10:22 AM
... Really being a sailor has little to do with reenacting. (though it can help!)

We're just playing sailor, so accuracy is more important than how you actually acquire it. Cool if you can make it yourself though!

(And while some sailors surely made their own hammocks, I believe they were issued, for the most part)

I have often wondered on what stationary fixture does an 1860's naval re-enactor usually fasten the hooks of his hammock? Where are their bulkheads? What constitutes their overheads?

Reading a prominent and seemingly respected naval uniform sutler say that re-enacting mariners most often have to roll up their pant legs to keep them from getting muddy is less than inspiring to some who have contemplated the re-created sea-going service.

Boy am I producing some downer posts of late. :(

Sorry about that, but I thought overhead hooks and swinging hammock postings sort of went together.
Walt

Ronnn
05-29-2008, 10:52 AM
I have often wondered on what stationary fixture does an 1860's naval re-enactor usually fasten the hooks of his hammock? Walt

Hmmmm, good question . . . . I didn't know people were doing naval re-enaction back in the 1860's!


Anyway, I can only speak for this 2008 re-enactor. I usually leave my hammock at home and sleep on a cot, which I imagine most 1860's era sailors did when ashore. A whores bed was probably also a popular place to sleep back then, but my girl has a little problem with that sort of accuracy, heheh.

RJSamp
05-29-2008, 03:29 PM
Actually there was a post on this a few crashes ago.....either here or on the AC. The thread was about US INFANTRY using hammock's, specifically in the Iron Brigade, 7th WI.

Lightningslinger
05-29-2008, 08:09 PM
Hmmmm, good question . . . . I didn't know people were doing naval re-enaction back in the 1860's!

Anyway, I can only speak for this 2008 re-enactor.

Isn't enacting more about creating or making something happen the first time? Conversely, isn't re-enacting sort of deja vu as in "All over again, and again and again"? Hence 1860's naval re-enactors re-creating versus 1860's sailors creating.

How many emulators of 1860's sailors do you know who use hammocks and where do they pitch them in 2008? Between tent stanchions perhaps like a landsman?

Standby All Lines! Prepare to Cast Off!

Walt



I have often wondered on what stationary fixture does an 1860's naval re-enactor usually fasten the hooks of his hammock? Walt

Ronnn
05-30-2008, 09:27 AM
Isn't enacting more about creating or making something happen the first time? Conversely, isn't re-enacting sort of deja vu as in "All over again, and again and again"? Hence 1860's naval re-enactors re-creating versus 1860's sailors creating.

How many emulators of 1860's sailors do you know who use hammocks and where do they pitch them in 2008? Between tent stanchions perhaps like a landsman?

Standby All Lines! Prepare to Cast Off!

Walt

That's why I thought it odd, heheh. Sort of like reenacting the Obama/Hillary Debates . . . . it was a rhetorical joke. On a more serious note: None of the fellers I work with use hammocks other than on the U.S.S. Hartford. I'd suppose if one wanted to use a hammock, tieing between two trees would be the most viable option.

Ross L. Lamoreaux
05-30-2008, 12:54 PM
Hammocks are one of those items that a good naval living historian should have in the kit, but with the caveat that they were most likely only used aboard ship. If you're doing an indoor shipboard living history, all the better, but if you're outside at the typical corndog/frybread fest, just have it for show and tell. There are too many references within the OR's and with the charts and diagrams of the NLP and NMLHA that show what shore parties truly carried. As a sailor maker's mate, I often bring out canvas and actually sew when talking to the public, and hammocks are part of the product, so it makes for good show and tell, but with a catch. They are difficult in the scheme of things to produce, but making a few dozen handsewn corded grommets take some time. Start by making some ditty bags and sea bags and work your way up to hammocks and boat covers. Next thing you know you'll be making white frocks for your shipmates between holystoning the deck and caulking seams.

Ronnn
05-30-2008, 05:03 PM
I'm not that good, I suppose.

Spinster
05-30-2008, 06:14 PM
Hello,
I was told that no one makes authentic CW naval hammocks anymore. It is hard to believe that in this day of reenacting/living history, aunthenticity requirements, and growing interest in CW naval history etc, that someone out there would be offering them! It would seem to me that anyone wanting to portray a naval guy would want one in his issue or kit. I wish someone offered them.
Take care,
Dave

Depending upon what your research shows about hammock composition for sailors from the southern ports, or for CSA navy, you may have a local resource for help.

If these were netted hammocks, then contact the Jim Parker or Ned Jenkins at nearby Fort Toulouse/Jackson in Wetumpka. While their time period is earlier, they should be able to point you to proper references for netting a hammock, or possibly supply you with the name of an 18th century rope worker who can make them.

As we've increasingly seen the use of river going or sea going vessels in the Gulf Coast reenactments in recent years, your need for a hammock is not as far fetched as it seems. Look also to the nearby Port Columbus Naval Museum http://www.portcolumbus.org/ for resources and information. As is evident by their site, they are already reproducing uniforms, ships china, and other necessaries, so if the demand is there, a hammock could be next on the list.

Its been a few years since I rode a bosun's chair from lander to ship in choppy waters off Fort Morgan-- ( Hat, Hoops and All)---and held on for dear life the rest of the day as deck cannon fired. I don't know if I'd be agile enough to do such again, but the memory is well worth the effort expended to acquire it.

Ross L. Lamoreaux
05-30-2008, 07:16 PM
Most of the hammocks from the CW period were made of canvas or hemp canvas according to the navy specifications. I have found no references to net-type hammocks for the military, but that's not to say there weren't any (I just haven't seen them). I'm not near my reference books, but I'll post the sizes of the two I've examined, as they are pretty similiar. There are references from period journals and diaries of some of them being made on board ship, which bodes with the practice of both navies to make equipment and clothing on board out of material paid for with ships funds or commutation money. This was an activity that I remember well some folks doing at the grand opening of the CW Naval Museum in Columbus. They really aren't too difficult to make with a little practice, as there are only two types of stitches visable in the originals that I viewed - the whip stitch and grommet stitch (the wrap around kind, not the buttonhole kind). They were made from a single piece of cotton duck or hemp canvas folded over on each end for the reinforcement of the grommets, and the grommets were corded for strength. I've seen several quality reproductions that were produced with small metal washers used to reinforce the grommets, which does indeed add strength but isn't necessarily period (a good tight stitching around the opening of the hole will cover them up well.

IPBarnard
06-03-2008, 01:22 PM
If anyone is interested I have my fathers WWII hammock and ropes. I could take some pictures and post them. If that would be of assistance.

Thanks,
Mark C. Foster

allanb4570
08-15-2008, 02:35 PM
There use to be a young fellow that lived in Pensacola, Fla. that made navy uniforms and hammocks. I bought a pair of trousers and a hammock from him. I will have to try and find his info. The hammock is excellent, handsewn grommets and a hemp looking rope. I also admit as in the this thread, I have never used the hammock yet, not even around the house!:rolleyes:

Regards, Allan
Armory Guards

allanb4570
08-18-2008, 12:02 PM
Ross, et all,

On the yahool groups CW Navy and Marine Forum there is a diagram of a CW period hammock posted by Tom Apple from Virginia. Hopefully the files are attached. I've not personally seen an original hammock, so, this redering may or may not be exact.

Texasbutternut
08-18-2008, 09:49 PM
Spending Sunday at my parents is always good, this time they had fresh crowder peas and a rack of pork ribs. yummy After dinner, Dad told some tales about his experiences with hammocks in WW2. He was sent to machinists' school at the Ford plant in Dearborn, MI in November and December of 1942. They were issued hammocks with the rest of their gear. For the first few weeks, the sailors tied their hammocks to frames that were just 3 feet off the floor. One end of the hammock had a metal ring, the other had a rope tied to a metal ring. They put the ring on a hook and tied the rope as tight as they could to another hook. After a couple of weeks they moved to the higher hooks, about 8 feet off the floor. A few sailors broke bones falling out of the hammocks, most learned how to turn over inside their hammocks. Even in Michigan in winter, sleeping in a hammock with a wool blanket below and one above, they kept warm.
On board the ship, there were hooks welded to nearly every overhead beam. Dad's assigned spot was in a passageway and taller people would bump him a lot. He said he got to where he didn't notice anymore.
In some places on the ship, hammocks were lined up side by side. Occasionally one sailor would start to fall and instinctively grab the hammock next to him, causing him to fall, and that man would instinctively grab the next hammock in line, and so on. Dad said it was kind of funny to watch them fall like dominoes. Not so far to fall on the ship, though.
So now I am wondering if life on the 1860s ships was similar to WW2 in regards to hammocks. Some things don't change much.
Dad also said Henry Ford was pretty sharp with the running of the plant. Ford would pick up all the garbage in Dearborn for free, then take it to a facility in the plant that squeezed the garbage; then the dry pressed stuff was burned to generate a huge amount of steam to generate electricity and run machinery and heat the buildings. The squeezings were refined into several products that Ford sold. Dad doesn't remember what they were beyond some kind of oil, wish I knew what they were.
That's enough history for today. Dad likes to talk about those days, I'm writing a lot of it down.
I could use a hammock for the back yard. ;-)

Hank Van Slyke
3rd Texas Light Artillery

Frenchie
08-19-2008, 12:48 AM
Hank, what your dad described about sleeping in a hammock aboard ship is pretty much universal. Union Jacks: Yankee Sailors in the Civil War by Michael J. Bennett talks about how it was for new recruits in Chap. 2, Any Man Can Become a Soldier: The Making of Union Sailors.

"A man's first night below deck undoubtedly proved the most terrifying. As recruits quickly discovered, ships made no room for mattresses. Instead, sailors had to sleep in hammocks that took up little space and effectively minimized the roll and pitch of the ship. Landsman Daniel Kemp was shocked when he gazed on "the plain piece of canvas" that was his new bed. Sleeping in a hammock was a practiced art. They were not easy to get into and, once in, even more difficult to stay in. New sailors routinely spent that first night climbing in then roughly falling out of their hammocks, much to the delight of other sailors. During that first night, landsmen already wrestling with uncooperative hammocks often found themselves tossed out or kicked out by mischievous mates. In order to heighten the terror, more devious tars slashed hammock riggings with their knives as landsmen slept, sending more than one man crashing down from heights as high as five feet. Landsman Hugh Burns remarked that he was "nocked Sencless" by his fall. "When I recovered my head was in Such pain that I dident no where I was."

GreencoatCross
08-20-2008, 02:18 PM
Here's an original, or at least a hammock from slightly post-war. Comparing this to the sketches provided a few posts back it's probably safe to say this is a nearly identical design.

When I found this a while back I made myself a repro. Not sure how well it will hold up though since I used a lighter weight canvas but it looks nice!

http://www.horsesoldier.com/catalog/g0015010.html

allanb4570
08-20-2008, 03:26 PM
Finally found the info for the man that made my hammock. He lived in Pensacola, Florida and made my hammock about 5-7 years ago. Some of you men down there in Florida may know him.
His name is Mark Lowe of the Ships Store. Last phone # I have is; 850-455-2330.

Ross L. Lamoreaux
08-20-2008, 03:35 PM
Here's an original, or at least a hammock from slightly post-war. Comparing this to the sketches provided a few posts back it's probably safe to say this is a nearly identical design.

When I found this a while back I made myself a repro. Not sure how well it will hold up though since I used a lighter weight canvas but it looks nice!

http://www.horsesoldier.com/catalog/g0015010.html
Yes sir, that one definitely conforms to the originals I've viewed of CW provenance. Thanks for the link.