PDA

View Full Version : Buttonhole scissors



jbkitts
10-30-2006, 08:30 AM
I need help locating a source for buttonhole scissors. At a recent event I talked with a well known producer of uniform items and they had highly recommended the Wooded Hamlet scissors. I contacted Needle & Thread over the weekend to order the pair that had been carried by the Wooded Hamlet (now owned by Needle & Thread) only to be told that they had returned all their scissors as not acceptable. I have examined the buttonhole scissors offered by Gingher, but the notch is too narrow (approximately 3/8") to work when cutting buttonholes on jackets. Are there any other substitutes out there?

Thank you,

Brad Kitts

AZReenactor
10-30-2006, 08:49 AM
I'd suggest checking antique shops. I found a really nice pair of German buttonhole scissors recently for about half of what a new Gingher pair would cost.

ElizabethClark
10-30-2006, 10:31 AM
You could also look for a buttonhole chisel and block--these make a very clean cut for a nice workable edge.

LibertyHallVols
10-30-2006, 12:25 PM
I use a set of wood chisels from Lowe's and a 10" section of 2x4 and have had good results.

jbkitts
10-31-2006, 08:10 AM
Appreciate the advice! Guess I will be cruising the antique stores! I hesitate to use the chisel method, my sewing table is too flimsy and the workbench too filthy. I get reasonable results using my tailor's point scissors and marking chalk, but was looking for a more consistent cut.

vmescher
10-31-2006, 08:57 AM
Appreciate the advice! Guess I will be cruising the antique stores! I hesitate to use the chisel method, my sewing table is too flimsy and the workbench too filthy. I get reasonable results using my tailor's point scissors and marking chalk, but was looking for a more consistent cut.

The chisel method will give you a consistent buttonhole cut each time (especially with thick fabrics) but I'll admit it is a scary way to do things. It is quick and as long as you have the correct sized chisel I think it gives the best cut for buttonholes.

I don't make the cuts on a table; I use the floor or even the garage floor and make sure that the surface is covered with a clean sheet of some type of drop cloth. Use a piece of wood (I have a chunk of maple, I think) for the base; place the garment,with the buttonholes marked, on top of the base and position the chisel; one good whack usually will cut the buttonhole and you are ready to sew them.

The advantage of the floor, at least for me, is that of height. With a table, I'm not tall enough to be able to apply the force to make a good cut. Also, since I'm not the best with tool, if I miss the chisel, all I hit is the floor and don't have to worry about denting or scarring a table.

Carolann Schmitt
10-31-2006, 09:15 AM
The buttonhole chisels and blocks were created for this purpose and really do work the best.
- Their edge is very fine and very sharp so they can cut very finely sewn buttonholes cleanly.
- They come with a block of soft wood so you don't need to raid the wood pile; and you can use them anywhere - even on the dining room table.
- Most sets only come with one size chisel - approximately 5/8" wide; to cut a wider buttonhole you just reposition the chisel to the uncut section of the buttonhole. Professional quality sets come with two or more chisels and often include an eyelet punch.
- I have a problem with hand strength (carpal tunnel syndrome and arthritis) and I have no problem cutting through the thickest fabric just with firm pressure.
- They're affordable and available. A quick Internet search will provide many sources; this is just one http://www.thesewingplace.com/browseproducts/Buttonhole-Cutter-by-Clover.html

Cpt Boone
11-01-2006, 08:44 AM
Try Atlanta Thread Supply http://store.atlantathread.com/ . They have button hole scissors and button hole chisel sets.

jbkitts
11-01-2006, 12:24 PM
Okay, you all have convinced me to give the chisel method a try! I just placed my order with Atlanta Thread & Supply. I sincerely appreciate all the input!