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carson_reb
03-04-2011, 11:55 PM
I'm thinking about purchasing a penny whistle to put in my haversack and play in camp. Any suggestions?

The Clarke name is an old and reputable brand, so I've been looking at the Clarke Tin Whistles. I've also seen maple penny whistles.

Is tin better than wood, or vice-versa?

Any feedback would be appreciated.


Thanks.

uozumi
03-05-2011, 11:32 AM
Tin whistles and wood whistles were both popular by the 1860s. Wood whistles were more popular before 1851 when the Clarke tin whistles were put in an Exhibition. I personally would go with wood just because there are so many tin whistles out in the field (due to price.)

Also keep in mind when your persona got the whistle: if your persona has had that whistle since they were a kid, it may be reasonable to assume it would be wood. If it was something you bought after joining the army, it would probably be tin, since by that time it was a popular medium for making toys.

If you need help learning to play, I have a chart here that might be helpful:

http://worldturndupsidedown.blogspot.com/2009/11/tin-whistles-penny-whistles-irish.html

Good Luck!



Stephanie Farra

http://www.worldturndupsidedown.blogspot.com

Justin Runyon
03-06-2011, 09:51 PM
I am a long time whistle player with over 20 period and modern whistles. A great option for a period wooden whistle is one of Ralph Sweets two-piece tunables. They are reasonably priced, perfectly correct, and sound great...very resposive with good tone. Two caveats: 1. Ralph signs and numbers his pieces, but it's fairly non-descript. 2. They are fragile, get a tinsmith to make you a nice tube to fit it...trust me.

Ralph sells them in Delrin (completely inaccurate but beutiful tone and no maintainace), Blackwood and Rosewood here:

http://www.sweetheartflute.com/whistles.html

carson_reb
03-16-2011, 06:10 PM
Uozumi-

Thanks for the link to the fingering chart. I saved it on my computer for reference. It seems pretty easy to read and follow. I'm sure it will help.

BTW: I ordered both a wooden and a tin whistle. Between myself and my daughter (who plays the clarinet in school) we'll make use of both of them.

PetePaolillo
03-16-2011, 07:12 PM
I am a long time whistle player with over 20 period and modern whistles. A great option for a period wooden whistle is one of Ralph Sweets two-piece tunables. They are reasonably priced, perfectly correct, and sound great...very resposive with good tone. Two caveats: 1. Ralph signs and numbers his pieces, but it's fairly non-descript. 2. They are fragile, get a tinsmith to make you a nice tube to fit it...trust me.

Ralph sells them in Delrin (completely inaccurate but beutiful tone and no maintainace), Blackwood and Rosewood here:

http://www.sweetheartflute.com/whistles.html


I thought I heard the sound of a whistle coming from your tent in Savannah. I should have stopped in for the concert :):D