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RebeccaMI
10-02-2006, 07:19 PM
I decided I need to give up on any outerwear more complicated than a shawl so that I have time to worry about the ball gown I need at the end of this month. I can wear a shawl combined with wool stockings (or heck, long underwear... who is going to look under my dress?) and some other items to keep me warm. Then over the winter I can spend time putzing on a more proper coat/jacket.

Would black be a no-no color for a shawl? My local Joann fabric store has only one bolt of wool fabric. It's 100% wool and it's black. Right now it's on sale for $10.49 a yard. If black would not be an acceptable color for a shawl, then what about Federal Blue (like the Union boys wore)? I'm looking at the Oxford Mill End Store and their selection is quite wide (solids, houndstooths, textures, and Buffalo plaids) and their price is $10 a yard.

http://www.oxfordmillendstore.com/

Then, this is the real I'm-a-dummy question... If I have a 3 or 4 yard hunk of wool fabric, how do I do the shawl?

Oh, and this evening I ordered both Civil War Civilians and Who Wore What.

catspjamas
10-02-2006, 10:56 PM
Black wouldn't be wrong for a shawl. Black was a color. It was used for mourning, but it was also worn just as black is worn today, as a black outfit. I would think the simpliest way to make a shawl would be to cut the material into a triangle, and maybe add some fringe around it. In fact, what I would probably do would be to cut a very large square, fold it into a triangle with fringe to the inside, sew it, leaving an opening in which to turn it right side out, then sew the opening closed. That way it would be double thickness. I just have a question about wool being the proper material for a shawl, only because I've never seen a wool shawl, except for a knitted wool shawl. Someone else will have to answer that question.

Cats

Carolann Schmitt
10-02-2006, 11:01 PM
Dear Rebecca -

I think you've made a wise decision.

Black is an excellent choice for a shawl - goes with anything and it won't show much dirt. Other solid colors are good, as are some plaids and stripes.

Fabric - I don't know how heavy the wool is at your Joann's but, believe it or not, you want something fairly light weight. Remember, you're going to be folding this shawl so you'll have several layers with air pockets in between to help keep you warm. If it's too stiff and/or heavy, you're going to feel like you're wearing cardboard. The weight of the wool should be about the same as a nice light-medium weight wool dress or skirt. If you go to Joann's, unwind some of the wool and drape it over your arm. Does it hang nicely or does it look like a tent without poles? Unwind more of it and wrap it around your shoulders. Does it hug your shoulders and arms? Can you move in the shawl or does the shawl move you? Is it heavy? If it feels heavy in the store, especially if its a single layer, it's going to be unbearable to wear after a few hours and you'll go home with a stiff neck and upper back. :-)

If you're not happy with your selection at Joann's, DON'T buy it in a fit of desperation. Call the folks at Needle and Thread in Gettysburg (wait until Thursday, Friday or Saturday) at 717-334-4011 and ask for Darlene. Tell her I sent you and you need some light-medium weight wool for a shawl. I was there last week and she had a wonderful lightweight black-on-black with a woven windowpane pattern. She also had other colors that would be suitable. They will send swatches if you have time. These are very nice, fine quality wools that will last a long time. Another source for good wools is www.fashionfabricsclub.com and they're having a sale right now. They have some wools that would work very well for $7.00/yard.

How much do you need? Many period shawls were squares (length and width the same) or double squares (twice as long as wide). If the fabric is 58"-60" wide, you will need 1 2/3 yards for a square. You will need 3 1/3 yards for a double square.

How to make a shawl. This is the easy part. Unless there is printing on the selvage edges, you don't have to do anything with them. Straighten the two cut edges using one of these methods:
- Snip the selvage and tear it.
- Snip the selvage, pull a thread, and then cut on the line the pulled thread makes.
Then fringe out the cut ends. Your fringe can be as short as 1" or as long as you like. Unless your fabric is very loosely woven, you don't have to worry about it fringing out on its own. If the selvages have printing, just trim them off and fringe those edges also.

If you want a longer fringe, pull a thread at the depth you want; i.e. if you want a 4" fringe, pull a thread 4" from the cut edge. Now pull your threads working from the top of the fringe toward the bottom. This will keep your fringe from tangling as you work on it. Been there, done that, have the lint and a new sewing vocabulary for my efforts. :-)

How do you wear your shawl while working? Fold your shawl until you have a triangle. Put the shawl on, wrap the ends across the front of your body and around the back underneath the shawl. Tie the ends in a knot at your back waist. You'll be able to move your arms and work without dragging the shawl in the washtub.

If you want to look gracious and elegant, especially in a double square shawl, unfold it and drape it over your shoulders with the long ends hanging. An article in one of the lady's magazines mentioned that a shawl should be draped so it looked like you were just putting it on or just taking it off - slightly loose and flowing.

Feel free to ask more questions. Each of us who are 'veterans' were in your shoes when we started - thoroughly confused and a little frustrated. We've all had the same questions; maybe we can help keep you from making some of the mistakes we did. And remember - it's not the end of the world if you goof up. There's a period solution for every error! :-) :-)

Carolann Schmitt
10-02-2006, 11:08 PM
In fact, what I would probably do would be to cut a very large square, fold it into a triangle with fringe to the inside, sew it, leaving an opening in which to turn it right side out, then sew the opening closed. That way it would be double thickness.

Hi, Joni -
I've never seen an original shawl that's been constructed like this, or even one that's been cut as a triangle. And it kind of defeats the purpose and practicality of a shawl - a flat piece of fabric that can be folded, wrapped or layered for many different purposes: keep you warm, keep the baby warm, use it as a blanket, a picnic cloth, etc. etc. It's really much easier to do it like they did and as I mentioned in my post above.


I just have a question about wool being the proper material for a shawl, only because I've never seen a wool shawl, except for a knitted wool shawl.

With the exception of Paisley shawls, original wool shawls aren't that common today because they were so versatile and practical. Most of them were used until they were worn out. And unless the fabric is particularly distinctive or there is a provenance, it can be difficult to positively date them. However, you'll find literally thousands of references for them in period magazines, diaries, advertisements, etc. And occasionally I'll get lucky and find some original ones. I have five or six in my collection - from plain black worsted to a sheer gold and purple wool with a woven design.

catspjamas
10-02-2006, 11:31 PM
I've never seen square or double square shawls, only triangle shawls. It seems like every one has a triangle shawl, usually knitted, or lace. Which is also why I've never seen a wool shawl, they're always knitted wool or lace. What you describe sounds like a wool throw. I haven't researched shawls, just talked with people at events, and decided against a shawl, because they struck me as being more decorative than practical. So I'm going for a cape. But, I do read alot, you'd think I'd have come across a square shaw before.

Cats

Spinster
10-03-2006, 01:07 AM
I'd posted to your 'other' thread, and referred you to Needle and Thread before I saw Carolann had given such through directions on this thread for period correct shawls. Reviews of period images, magazine articles, and advertisements all reinforce the use of wool fabric shawls, in an astounding variety of colors and patterns (bad as I hate to admit it, because I tend to want to knit shawls, not weave them) .

Since your time is short on this, and you may not have time for swatches, that black on black windowpane really would be versitile, elegant, and a reliable period fabric type to purchase by mail order.

You'll be pleased with this effort--folks know the variety of knitted shawls I have made over the years, and recently I've noted that some are feeling a bit too heavy for older shoulders--I sat sewing with that length of wool on mine all evening, and was quite content---with the wool, though alas, not with my sewing project.............

Delia Godric
10-03-2006, 06:36 AM
I think the black on black window pane shawl would be a beautiful idea. Depending on the weight and weave of the solid black, that may be lovely as well.

I thought I would add some pictures to Carolann's suggestions for fringing your shawl. This page has pictures of fringe and my thoughts on fringe. They are basicly the same as Carolann's. The only difference is I fringe in sections. It helps to keep the threads from tangling and the cat from attacking the long threads. http://www.geocities.com/shadowofthesundial/fringe.html

Here is a quote I enjoy on wearing a shawl:
"How to Wear a Shawl.
"If a lady sports a shawl at all, (and only very falling shoulders should venture). we should recommend it to be always either falling off or being put on, which produces a pretty action. Or she should wear it upon one shoulder and down the other, or in some way drawn irregularly, so as to break the uniformity. One of the faults of the present custom is, as every real artist knows, that it offers too few diagonal lines. Nothing is more picturesque than a line across the bust, like the loose girdle, sloping across the hips, in the costume of the early Plantagenets. On this account the long scarf shawl is as picturesque a thing as a lady can wear. With the broad pattern sweeping over one shoulder, and a narrow one, or none at all, on the other, it supplies the eye with that irregularity which drapery requires; while the slanting form and colors of the border, lying carelessly around the figure, give that eastern idea which every shawl more or less implies. What Oriental would ever wear a shawl straight up and down, and uniform on both sides, as our ladies often do?" (New Orleans Daily Delta, January 15, 1855).

I support Carolann and Terre in saying shawls definitally could be wool and square. A significant portion shawls, whether plain, plaid or printed, were wool. They were also cotton and silk.

In the year ending June 30, 1857, we imported 2,246,351 shawls and exported 63,063 shawls. (Homans, I. Smith A Cyclopedia of Commerce and Commercial Navigation. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1859) In 1860, the US produced 616,400 long and square wool shawls (Kennedy, Joseph. Manufactures of the United States in 1860; Compiled from the Original Returns of the Eighth Census.) These were produced in Lawrence, MA (Bay State Mills), Lowell, MA, Troy, NY (Watervliet Mills), Washington, NY, Skeneateles, NY, possibly New York City (Hotchkissville Manufacturing Company), Rhode Island (Peace Dale Manufacturing Company), Tariffville, CT, Bloomfielf, NJ, Philadelphia, PA, Lexington, KY and other areas.

For a nice online collection of shawls, see www.MFA.org go to collections and search for shawls. This will give you a broad range of shawls through-out several centuries. Here are more shawls online:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~cleghorns/nina/LadyWithShawlBB.jpg
http://www.sensibility.com/vintageimages/victorian/images/ladyshawlcdv.jpg
Men w/ shawl http://www.authentic-campaigner.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3691
Two images of women holding shawls:
http://webpages.charter.net/squirldog/CDVpage5.htm
http://webpages.charter.net/squirldog/CDVpage3.htm e
Paisley shawl over woman’s shoulders:http://www.victorianmillinery.com/cdv/images/cdv080_jpg.jpg
Long lace shawl: http://www.prices4antiques.com/item_images/medium/16/33/88-01.jpg
Chantilly lace shawl, ca. 1850 http://www.harriets.com/museum.htm
Chantilly lace shawl, ca. 1860 http://www.antique-lace.com/Laces&textiles/2373/2373.htm
Muslin shawl, ca. 1835-1845 (Canandaigua, NY) http://www.antique-lace.com/Laces&textiles/2076/2076.htm
Limerick shawl, ca. 1860 http://www.antique-lace.com/Laces&textiles/2295/2295.htm
French paisley type shawl, ca. mid-1800s http://www.goldenthread.com/text004.htme
CDV with a knit shawl with 1864 knitting directions http://www.csa-scla.org/articles/KnittedShawl1864.htm
Embroidered shawl, ca. 1860 and lace shawl, ca. 1860 http://www.quite-contrary.org/victorian_pix3.htm
Many shawls http://www.textileasart.com
Russian shawl http://www.oakland.edu/cas/emuseum/rem/rc/rctexts/rc_051.htm
Shawl gallery http://www.vintagetextile.com/gallery_victorian.htm
1850's heavy silk satin, 60"x60" http://http://www.corsetsandcrinolines.com/timelineitem.php?index=185026
CDVs, Daguerreotypes, etc with Shawls

Small check or plaid fabric shawl with fringe http://webpages.charter.net/squirldog/CDVimage12.htm
Fabric shawl, possibly silk and velvet with fringe; appears to be a triangle http://webpages.charter.net/squirldog/CDVimage13.htm
Either a knit/crochet shawl or cape in 3+ colors http://www.finedags.com/archives/antechamber_archive/July_2004.htm
Fashionable shawl http://www.davidchasegallery.com/queries/product.asp?ID=370
Knitted & crochet shawls http://www.contouche.de/en/1800/arte/a185x_1.shtml
Florence Nightingale and Her Sister by William White -- embroidering a shawl
http://www.contouche.de/en/1800/arte/a1852_2a.shtml A Symphony (I) by Moritz von Schwind, 1852
http://www.contouche.de/en/1800/arte/a1852_2b.shtml A Symphony (II) by Moritz von Schwind, 1852
http://www.contouche.de/en/1800/arte/a1868_2.shtml Madame Gaudibert by Monet, 1868 -- Musée du Jeu de Paume, Paris
http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=11354 Edward Hughes (1832-1908) In Church
http://www.bestpriceart.com/painting/?image=osborn1.jpg&tc=cgfa "Nameless and Friendless" is by Emily Mary Osborn.
http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=7703Edward Hughes (1832-1908) The Secret Letter. Oil on canvas, 1867

Hope this helps. I will likely have more to actually say once I wake up fully.

Anna Worden
(who realizes she really needs to update her shawl pages.)

ElizabethClark
10-03-2006, 09:53 AM
Researching baby things, the notes I've come across on infant shawls are all for squares or double squares, to be folded to a triangle and used. I've not yet come across notes for a cloth shawl that's been cut to a triangle. Perhaps it's a case of "history did it one way, and some reenactors have a tradition of doing it another way?" I know some of the knitted designs are worked in a triangle, and others are worked in a square or rectangle just like cloth versions.

Carolann, thanks for the "fringe backward" tip--I've been pulling out more hair than wool threads, trying to re-edge a wool square I like. LOL Last time, my husband did it for me. I was about at the point of making a pie bribe, and handing it off again. :)

Spinster
10-03-2006, 11:17 AM
You know Elizabeth, the more I give it thought, the great majority of 19th century knitted shawl patterns are for various forms of knitted lace squares, with boxed borders. A secondary variety are of the collared and fitted capelet, seen in both knitted and crochet versions.

The plain triangle knitted shawl by "Mrs. Jane Weaver" so often drawn upon, appears in so many publications, under so many names (I've traced it into the 18th century), sometimes with the additional admonition that it be worked up out of scrap yarn by women of means to provide charity for the poor. Its simply not a fashion shawl.

While its haphazard use of homespun and dyepot makes it an ideal interpretation for Sister and I as lower class rural folks, its become a bit of a reenactorism, because it is a simple shawl for a beginning knitter to execute.

Joanna
10-03-2006, 11:54 AM
>>>Carolann said: Another source for good wools is www.fashionfabricsclub.com and they're having a sale right now. They have some wools that would work very well for $7.00/yard. <<<



There are some lovely colors on this page http://tinyurl.com/rgtep and they are 100% wool, but I am not familiar with the term "double knit wool" Anyone have any thoughts on their appropriateness? Regards, Joanna

Delia Godric
10-03-2006, 12:33 PM
I planned to get back to putting my thoughts down for this this morning but I got distracted by the thought of an 1876 Holiday event. (note: I have never done anything past 1867.)

Triangles vs squares & double-squares…. I went through the shawl images I currently have with me in my usb key. I looked for shawls that were obviously triangular shawls. Out of the 464 shawl images (cdvs, originals and period art), 7 were triangular lace shawls, 3 were triangular knit/crochet shawls and 5 were triangular knit patterns, totaling 15 triangles. This is roughly 3.23% of the shawls. Most of these are from museum collections. All land between 1840 and 1875, most being 1855-1865. Compare this to the smaller folders of “sutler” offered shawls and there is a definite discrepancy. A majority of the shawls offered on “sutler” sites I have saved are knit, silk and lace triangles. (I have to say the lace shawls are completely out of consideration because they are so far removed from the lace shawls of the period.) The one merchant that carried a variety of three-quarter shawls last spring doesn’t appear to have any currently listed 

I looked at the Oxford Mill site. While I think their wools would make pretty modern coats or even a blanket, I consider the 14 to 16 oz weight to be far to heavy for shawls. My Paisley shawls each weigh less than a pound each. My fabric shawls are about an 11 oz weight; about 18 to 21 oz total weight each. (I don’t have the exact measurements with me.) Each one keeps me wonderfully warm. One usually serves to warm my knees as I drive to work or in a cold classroom. My red one worked nice in cool weather with heavy winds and hail this past spring. It was large enough to wrap up in while being light enough not to be cumbersome during a long walk.

I still think black is a smart color because it is versatile. I would love a nice black shawl. More specifically I would love the beautiful antique wool long shawl currently for sale less than a mile from my house. But, I own a long haired cat that makes everything match her. According to a Mrs M.L. in the May, 1860 Godey’s the following color shawls are best suited for each dress:
Black or white suits every dress;
Scarlet should be worn with black, brown, or any undecided color;
Blue with dark brown or black;
A well covered India pattern will also suit almost any color.
From my files, I see 2 fabric shawls that are mostly black. I didn’t consider any of the cdvs in determining color. The shawl I mentioned wanting is a solid black wool. The wool is not much heavier than what we would use for dress fabric.

Carolann, I don’t know how I missed this this morning….. Can I please see pictures of your gold and purple sheer shawl???

Elizabeth,
I am finding a number of things where "history did it one way, and some reenactors have a tradition of doing it another way." This is harder to break than introducing new information on unknown topics. But that’s a whole other conversation.

From the Fashion Fabrics site, I like the color of the one labeled “Yellow wool suiting”. The pic doesn’t match the description. Any thoughts?
I don’t think double-knit wool would fray the way a shawl would need to.

Anna Worden

vmescher
10-03-2006, 12:35 PM
The plain triangle knitted shawl by "Mrs. Jane Weaver" so often drawn upon, appears in so many publications, under so many names (I've traced it into the 18th century), sometimes with the additional admonition that it be worked up out of scrap yarn by women of means to provide charity for the poor. Its simply not a fashion shawl.

While its haphazard use of homespun and dyepot makes it an ideal interpretation for Sister and I as lower class rural folks, its become a bit of a reenactorism, because it is a simple shawl for a beginning knitter to execute.

The knitted triangular shawls may not be delicate lacy fashion shawls but of the patterns I've looked at they can be made of fingering weight yarn to sport or DK weight yarn. One pattern even commented that "This shawl was quite new." While I wouldn't recommend they be worn with a fancy dress, I think they would be quite appropriate with a plainer day dress.

Some of the triangular shawl patterns are fairly simple ones that just use the garter stitch and increase either at the beginning of every other row or start in the middle of the shawl and increase in the middle. Some can use more complicated stitches such as double knitting or a stitch that is used in the "spotted shawl" and may be better for people who are more familiar with knitting. I'm better at the simpler patterns.

There are many lacy patterns, using very fine yarn, for shawls but I need to be a much better knitter before I attempt a complicated pattern. I also need to be able to be able to follow an intricate pattern and talk at the same time (which isn't likely anytime soon).

Joanna
10-03-2006, 11:06 PM
From the Fashion Fabrics site, I like the color of the one labeled “Yellow wool suiting”. The pic doesn’t match the description. Any thoughts?
I don’t think double-knit wool would fray the way a shawl would need to.
Anna Worden


I actually meant would double-knit wool be suitable for dresses or coats? I know I didn't express myself very clearly at all! I do not know what the term means, althought the weight sounds right (8.5 oz) - I just like the colors. What about wool crepe? Um, every time I go back to the site it seems the wools are in a different order - the URL I gave earlier does not pull up the same fabrics and when I found them, they were on 2 separate pages instead of the same page they were on last time. Or am I just needing a little more sleep?:rolleyes:
Joanna

PS Do we need a wool primer? Is there one that I would find if I wasn't to tired to see straight, much less search?

Delia Godric
10-04-2006, 09:32 AM
I have worked under the premise that double-knit fabrics and modern wool crepe were not appropriate for period use. I went looking for some documentation for you about the double-knit. I wanted to find a date when double-knit fabric started being produced. I didn't find what I was looking for. I will keep looking.

I work only with woven fabrics for wool, silk, or cotton.

If I am wrong about the double knit, someone please let me know. And if someone could be more clear on crepe, please add it.

Anna Worden

Spinster
10-04-2006, 09:55 AM
Anna,

I believe you are making a good generalization here. While commerical 'frame knit' fabrics were available by 1860, and home knitting machines coming into manufacture, the industry was not producing the more sophisticated fabrics we see today---information I've seen points more towards the use for undergarment fabrics such as men's underware.

Delia Godric
10-04-2006, 10:33 AM
Thank you for the confirmation.
I am now more curious about knitting machines. I did find a site called knittingtogether.org which has some interesting historical information for one company and some nice images.

Thanks, Anna Worden

ElizabethClark
10-04-2006, 11:20 AM
I've not seen or read to date any mention of or original woman's dress or coat made of double-knit fabric; modern wool crepe is a different creature than wool crape in the period, and dreadful to sew with (or at least, dreadful to alter in modern mother-of-bride outfits. ICK.)

Plain woven wools would be a better bet for the shawl, and for dresses... though years ago I passed up a delicious chocolate brown wool satin in about an 8 ounce weight, and I've mourned it ever since...

Spinster
10-04-2006, 02:45 PM
Thank you for the confirmation.
I am now more curious about knitting machines.

You and me both. I've acquired a period machine, complete right down to its original invoice and shipping label. Its going to be about another month before I can get up with a lady who can teach me about it.

In the meantime, all I can do is open the crate and stare inside--I'm terrified to touch a thing!!

Joanna
10-04-2006, 06:53 PM
Thanks - I think the "knit" in "double-knit" went right past me - I told you I was tired! Too bad - some great colors.

What weight is the best for very lightweight and for everyday wear (dresses)?I'm sure we discussed this on Elizabeth's site previously :sad:

Joanna Jones

Delia Godric
10-05-2006, 10:34 AM
What weight is the best for very lightweight and for everyday wear (dresses)?

Wools for dresses can range from sheer gauze to a tad heavier than cotton. Actually, I don't know that it actually heavier, just woven a little different making it feel thicker but not adding weight. That's how I would describe my wool/silk dress which is incredibly comfortable. A modern term to look for in descriptions is "tropical weight". I think that's about 6 to 8 oz weight. fine weave, sheers and gauzes would each weigh less. I don't know what 8 to 10 oz would be called beside suiting. I wouldn't do anything over that for a dress.

Let me know if anyone disagrees with my numbers.

Anna Worden

ElizabethClark
10-05-2006, 09:12 PM
They look good to me. Tropical and "Summer" weights work well for all-season dresses (layered with other light wool garments for cold-weather wear.)

KarinTimour
10-06-2006, 06:22 PM
Just to throw my two cents into the ring, I have had several double square shawls and they have saved me on more than one occassion. I've had two lost by airline baggage mishaps -- otherwise I would only have had one.

I don't have a coat, and this is my form of outerwear -- paired with mittens, a scarf or warm bonnet, and wool petticoat a double square shawl has kept me toasty at several very cold Remembrance Day Parades, Winter of '64 (late February, Western New York 5 miles from Lake Erie), Outpost, and Recon 2 (below freezing at night, sleeping outside no tents and only the blankets we could carry).

None were originals, all were made by me -- using the measurements 120 inches of 60 inch fabric, buying 120 inches (plus a smidge for hemming). I chose not to go with fringing. I used the selvages (none had printing) as they were, and hemmed the cut edges in about an inch. One I made a little fancier by buying enough gold braid to sew to the "right" side of the shawl an inch from the edge all the way around.

As everyone else has mentioned, you want a good woven wool that is fairly lightweight, so that it drapes well. Others here know much more than I do about fabric specifics. My rule of thumb has been to look for something that could be used to make a clingy skirt -- not coat fabric or anything stiff. Part of the way that it keeps you warm is by draping close to your body and trapping the warmer air close to you. When you fold a double square into a square and then into a triangle, you've got four layers of wool. All of those layers need to drape around you when they are folded together. Something even slightly stiff on the bolt, when folded four times is going to stick out stiffly around you and defeat the purpose.

Another issue is that a double square shawl can be completely unfolded at night. Mine has been a blanket, a throw, been used as a privacy curtain, a windbreak, rolled into a pillow, etc. I've read several accounts of women travelling on trains using their double square shawls as blankets this way at night if they had to sleep on the cars.

Can't say enough good things about them, and it's a very fast, useful project. When a shawl is big enough, you'd be amazed what a difference it makes in your impression -- you start looking like many of the pictures that have been posted on this thread.

Sincerely,
Karin Timour
Period Knitting -- Socks, Sleeping Hats, Balaclavas
Atlantic Guard Soldiers' Aid Society
Email: Ktimour@aol.com

Carolann Schmitt
10-23-2006, 10:22 AM
Carolann, I don’t know how I missed this this morning….. Can I please see pictures of your gold and purple sheer shawl??? Anna Worden

Hi, Anna -

I'm sorry it's taken me so long to get back to you. I'll be happy to share pictures of the shawl, but I have to take them first! :-) Don and I are doing a major photo session later this fall and we'll be photographing all of the shawls at that time.

Carolann

Delia Godric
10-23-2006, 10:58 AM
Carolann,

Sounds good.
I will be happy to send back the pictures of my two Paisleys. I need to take some time to take better ones of the second one. It's more fragile so I haven't taken it out of the house. I tried taking pictures of it on Tippy (mannequin) and on the floor. I don’t have the space in the apartment to get a full picture yet. I may just do what we had to do with Grandma’s quilts this past weekend, have 2 people hold it up carefully. Any picture tips?

Anna Worden

Carolann Schmitt
10-25-2006, 08:20 AM
I'm the world's worst photographer, Anna, so it's fortunate that I married a very good one. Some of the key elements Don focuses on are:
- Good lighting.
- Use a tripod or copy stand.
- Good background or back drop.
- Learn how to use a good photo software program if you're shooting digital images.
- Good camera/lenses/high resolution.

As a side note, Don is teaching a seminar at the 2007 Conference on using digital technology to study period images. A section of his presentation will discuss how to photograph artifacts and original garments.

Delia Godric
10-25-2006, 11:28 AM
Thank you.

I can do #4 and borrow #2 from Dad. #5 might eventually happen. I currently have my EasyShare from last Christmas. The rest is a bit difficult for me in my small over-full apartment. For the last set of pictures for the CC, I took half the furniture out of my livingroom and pinned a sheet to my wall quilt. It was quite the fiasco. I think it was easier attempting to take pictures on Dad's clothes line in the breeze.

I saw the listing for his seminar. It sounds very interesting. The whole line-up does.

Thanks again,
Anna Worden