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sbl
05-19-2010, 09:58 AM
I had a quick look on-line for CW era Virginia Regimental flags. The few that I found are of course hand painted and have the the feature of a full breast plate or gown being worn by the Goddess of Virtue. Were there any back then that resembled the current Virginia flag in dress?

plankmaker
05-19-2010, 11:21 AM
Send these folks an email. They are usually pretty good at getting back with an answer.

http://www.moc.org/site/DocServer/Flag_Table_for_Website.pdf?docID=5741

sbl
05-19-2010, 12:27 PM
Cool site! Thanks.

reb64
05-19-2010, 10:26 PM
I had a quick look on-line for CW era Virginia Regimental flags. The few that I found are of course hand painted and have the the feature of a full breast plate or gown being worn by the Goddess of Virtue. Were there any back then that resembled the current Virginia flag in dress?

The exposed breast was supposedly done after the war to show how Va was exposed, undone, ravaged or disgraced i was told. Im glad to see it restored to full armor as it was then

sbl
05-20-2010, 06:33 AM
The full breast plate has a traditional origin even after the WBTS on the flag and seal. The current exposed goddess appears to be a 20th century design, one source saying 1930.

plankmaker
05-20-2010, 07:59 AM
Doesn't answer your question, but I thought they were interesting.

Richmond Dispatch.
Thursday morning......Feb. 21, 1861.

Military flags.

--Among some flags just finished in Baltimore, is a State flag of Virginia, of rich blue silk, five feet in width and six in length. The flag is embellished on one side by an oil painting, representing the coat of arms of Virginia, within a rich scroll work. The reverse side contains in gold lettering the motto--"Give me Liberty, or give me Death! 115 Regiment V. M." Another is the thirteen stripes, with the coat of arms of Virginia on one side, and the following inscription-- "To the New Creek, Va., Riflemen, from the ladies and citizens, February 1, 1861. " The reverse side bears the following--"New Creek Riflemen, organized January, 1860."

The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1861.

Richmond Dispatch.
Local matters.

State flag.
--A large-sized flag of the Southern Confederacy has been made for State use by the Governor, and will be hoisted on the Capitol to-day. No doubt the raising will be signalized by the firing of cannon. The flag which is to be raised consists of three bars of red and white. The upper red, middle white, lower red. The lower bar extends the whole length of the flag, and just above it, next to the staff on the upper left-hand corner of the flag, is a blue Union with the seven stars in a circle. The admission of Virginia will add another star. The design is simple, easily recognized, and sufficiently distinct from the old gridiron.

Richmond Dispatch.
Tuesday morning...Dec. 31, 1861.

Singular State flag.
--The flag of the Texas camp, at Camp Wigfall, near Dumfries, Va., is made of the bridal dress of Mrs. Wigfall. Says the correspondent of the Austin Gazette:
It bears the emblem of the "Lone Star," and this is of pure white silk, set in blue ground; the fold are purple and white. The hearts of all are riveted to it. It never will be given up. An old war-worn warrior approached it, and as his eyes gazed steadily upon the banner, he said: "That star was made of the bridal dress of the lady of our gallant colonel. She worked it with her fair hands, and gave it to us to carry through the battles of our country. How could we fall to protect. How could we fall to protect it with our lives? No, Sir! I never failed to meet the enemy when that star was our watchword, and now when our whole South is in danger, I feel that my poor life can be given up easily upon that flag as my shroud." The old fellow with his grey hairs, still stands before my memory. Such is the feeling of every Texan.

sbl
05-20-2010, 09:33 AM
Well it's still interesting.


I think that it the flag lost at Antietam. The Fifth NHV faced the 1st Texas but it wasn't a 5th soldier that picked up that flag.

Still wondering if the Texan's San Jacinto flag is in danger of censure.

Pvt Schnapps
05-20-2010, 09:01 PM
Check out the medal in this article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seal_of_Virginia

sbl
05-20-2010, 09:27 PM
The 1780 looks nude but I think that the shoulder armor gives it away as an "anatomically correct" breast plate in the roman style.

http://www.larp.com/legioxx/caesarstatue.jpg

reb64
05-22-2010, 02:11 PM
The full breast plate has a traditional origin even after the WBTS on the flag and seal. The current exposed goddess appears to be a 20th century design, one source saying 1930.

the fist decade or so after the war saw the then pro union govenors at the top in Va. If it were to happen for the reasons I was told as a child thenit would have been then perhaps. more research would make this a great college paper.

sbl
05-22-2010, 03:17 PM
At least Thomas Jackson wasn't forced to look on the unclothed female form even in painted silk.

col90
05-22-2010, 03:56 PM
Send these folks an email. They are usually pretty good at getting back with an answer.

http://www.moc.org/site/DocServer/Flag_Table_for_Website.pdf?docID=5741


You will also find that their flag collection is now online at http://www.moc.org/site/PageServer?pagename=ce_col_flags

Colleen Formby

sbl
05-22-2010, 05:24 PM
Thank you!

All the Virginia flags that are not obscured in some way (expect two post 1950 flags in the collection) appear to have breast plate armor on the goddess.

The goddess's also have nice "gams."

sbl
05-24-2010, 07:31 PM
Robert Langdon is on the case....


http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u100/sbl1952/politics/the-da-vinci-code-inline200605150_1.jpg