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crowley_greene
09-23-2006, 03:01 PM
I need to load some more rounds, getting ready for Perryville in a couple of weeks.

I'd be interested in some opinions of best sizes of blank loads for a .69 caliber. I've used 60 grains in the past (same as a .577?), and it seemed a little lame. I went to 80 grains and have used that for a while. But a couple of people have told me that 80 grains in a blank load, not live firing, just wastes powder.

I'll keep experimenting. I guess 70 is next.

Also, how much does grains of load relate to whether one uses 4F or 3F?

But what are the thoughts of some of you .69ers here?

TimKindred
09-23-2006, 03:08 PM
Comrade,

I can only vouch for the .58 rounds, but anything over 70 grains of fffg is definately wasting powder. Back around 93 or so, a friend and I were curious about max loads for blanks, so we set up an experiment. we placed a clean sheet of drywall 20 feet from us, and starting with a 50 grain(fffg) load, we fired directly at it. We added 5 grains each time to the load. At 75 grains, we detected stipling on the driwall, small black dots and a veneer of thin grey film, a clear indication that unburnt particles were being expelled from the bore.

The problem with blanks is that there is nothing in front of them to add pressure and force all of the powder to be consumed. Therefor, the force of those particles at the base of the powder charge expanding are simply pushing the front grains out and downrange. Theoretically, that could hurt someone as well.

The CS Government Arsenals used a maximum load of 110 grains of ffg for .69 calibre cartridges. I would suggest that 80 grains of fffg would be a maximum load, considering the greater width of the bore and thus the greater chance to conflagrate all of the charge within the barrel.

Respects,

flattop32355
09-23-2006, 10:45 PM
Also, how much does grains of load relate to whether one uses 4F or 3F?

I believe you are referring to 2F or 3F black powder, not 4F, which is too fine a particle size for use in our weapons. 1F is the coarse artillery powder.

There's no substantial difference between using 2F or 3F. Both are acceptable using similar loads.

Rob Weaver
09-25-2006, 07:01 AM
I can get a decent bang out of as little as 50 grains in a .58 rifle, but when I fire my Brown Bess (.75) I found I really need at least 70-75 grains in the main charge. The off-set of the easy-to-clean smoothbore is that it demands a little heftier cartridge!

molassus
09-25-2006, 03:06 PM
Sir - I have shouldering my .69 caliber Springfield ('42 model) for some time now and have settled on a 70 grain round. It provides the best report for a reasonable expenditure of money. Anything less will not satisfy you in the field. Give it a try at one event to see how you like the 70 grain round.

Joe Lassus
9th Kentucky U.S. Co B

harley_davis
09-25-2006, 05:22 PM
Sir;
I have found that when I use the normal .58 caliber 60 grain loads in my .69 caliber Springfield I may experience an occasional misfire. I suppose the larger bore to be the culprit but since I went to an 80 grain load, I no longer have a misfire issue. The 60 grain load is somewhat wimpy in the .69 but since I went to the larger load, my mates no longer snicker when my old '42 lets loose. I concur that over 80 grains becomes a waste of powder without an appreciable gain in bang. Good luck,
Respectfully,

Mint Julep
09-25-2006, 09:51 PM
I honestly think a 60 grain charge gets lost on the way down the barrel of a .69 caliber weapon. Mine never go off.

I feed my '42 about 85 grains at a time. BOOM.

Of course, the correct answer to your question is: Those cartridges I take from a pard's cartridge box or pick up off the ground. I did not pay for that powder.

Those are the best cartridges.

MJ

Rob Weaver
09-26-2006, 06:14 AM
I think the most common cause of misfires in reenacting is too small a charge. I have a 20-year-old Dixie 1863 that will fire 50 grains pretty reliably, and even sometimes as low as 35 grains if the barrel is really clean and really dry. I got a brand new Armi Sport '61 this year and it won't seem to fire with anything less than 60-70 grains. Anybody know why?

tompritchett
09-26-2006, 07:02 AM
I think the most common cause of misfires in reenacting is too small a charge. I have a 20-year-old Dixie 1863 that will fire 50 grains pretty reliably, and even sometimes as low as 35 grains if the barrel is really clean and really dry. I got a brand new Armi Sport '61 this year and it won't seem to fire with anything less than 60-70 grains. Anybody know why?

If I would hazard a guess, I would speculate that the discrepancy may be in the difference in depth from the opening from the nipple chamber and the top of the bore plug in the barrel. This difference would be caused by just how may turns, and fractions of turns, the plug was twisted into the barrel before being sealed.

Just my 2 cents.

bob 125th nysvi
09-30-2006, 10:30 AM
I honestly think a 60 grain charge gets lost on the way down the barrel of a .69 caliber weapon. Mine never go off.

I feed my '42 about 85 grains at a time. BOOM.

Of course, the correct answer to your question is: Those cartridges I take from a pard's cartridge box or pick up off the ground. I did not pay for that powder.

Those are the best cartridges.

MJ

I always use 60-65 grains in my springfield and can count the number of annual misfires on one hand.

I think if your geting consistant misfires at that load one of three things is happening. (1) The barrel isn't clean enough, (2) Your using too much oil inside the barrel and the powder is sticking to it, (3) the spark channel is partially blocked (that's what was causing mine when I had problems).

Anything over 70 in a .577 is like loading a cannon, I suspect anything under 70 in a.69 is like not loading at all.

Bob Sandusky
Co C 125th NYSVI
Esperance, NY

Southern Cal
10-10-2006, 01:21 AM
Solved most all my big bore misfire problems by buying multiple nipples and having a machinist bore out at least one of the nipples to .030" (the nipples are too hard to drill myself and required a carbide bit and a slow speed). Safety first! I use the bored out nipples ONLY for firing blanks, NEVER for live firing. Back pressure exerted on an opened up nipple could conceiveably lift the hammer under a live load, sending forth both flame and "shrapnel" from the spent cap (a safe shooter should be wearing safety glasses when live firing in any case). A pipe cleaner can be forced through the bored out nipple but will not pass through an unaltered nipple. Safer yet, unscrew the nipple and inspect it before live firing. Safer indeed is to have an "iron" for firing blanks and another for live firing according to the maker's recommended loads; for those who can afford it, that is. Anyway, I reduced the charge charge from 70+ grains FFFG to 60+ grains without problem, which extends the can of powder for about fifteen more "rounds".