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Washington_Mess
09-22-2006, 09:36 AM
Greetings,
Often times one will find accounts of rice being issued with rations. What type of rice is period for the mid 19th century? Was it predominantly brown or was it white?

TimKindred
09-22-2006, 01:41 PM
Comrade,

Go here:

http://www.carolinaplantationrice.com/

Respects,

tenfed1861
09-22-2006, 02:07 PM
Carolina rice is good stuff.I took it to an event last Nov,and my messmates loved it.It's 100% period correct,too.
Cullen

AZReenactor
09-22-2006, 04:42 PM
Greetings,
Often times one will find accounts of rice being issued with rations. What type of rice is period for the mid 19th century? Was it predominantly brown or was it white?
You type that like those are the only two classifications. Heck that's like saying there is only one type of coffee bean. ;-)

Carolina Gold and Carolina White were likely the most common rice prior to the colaps of the Carolina rice industry following the Civil War.

An internet search turned up a couple of nice little write ups on the History of Rice (http://www.amrice.com/6-0.cfm), History of Rice in America (http://www.foodreference.com/html/art-rice-history.html), and Anson Mills Rice History (http://www.ansonmills.com/page19/page48/page48.html).

I also stumbled across the Carolina Gold Rice Foundation (http://www.carolinagoldricefoundation.org/) which is dedicated to preserving this and other heirloom grains.

A couple of books that might be of interest are: History of the American Rice Industry (http://www.amazon.com/gp/search?index=blended&keywords=A%20History%20of%20the%20American%20Rice% 20Industry&_encoding=UTF8)
Southern Agriculture During the Civil War Era, 1860-1880 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/search?index=blended&keywords=A%20History%20of%20the%20American%20Rice% 20Industry&_encoding=UTF8)

3rd Alabama
09-23-2006, 08:03 AM
Comrade,

Go here:

http://www.carolinaplantationrice.com/

Respects,


Try this stuff it is unbielevable. I ordered a bunch for a food ration earlier this year and was quite impressed with it's aroma and taste

Cornfed
10-12-2006, 08:39 PM
Thanks for the post on the Carolina Plantation website. Not only an excellent source for rice, I see that they also sell cowpeas or field peas. Knowing several references state that Lee's army was issued this "delicacy," I have been searching for a place that sells these peas in a dry form (not canned). My search is over. - Phil Maddox

Spinster
10-12-2006, 09:15 PM
Phil,

If by chance you were amoung those who partook of the "free lunch" at Tuckers Tavern at Perryville on Saturday evening, those cowpeas made up the main portion of the meal.

We also followed the Plantation's receipt for rice pudding for breakfast on Saturday morning---it was still excellent served cold on Sunday.

Cornfed
10-13-2006, 06:13 AM
Phil,

If by chance you were amoung those who partook of the "free lunch" at Tuckers Tavern at Perryville on Saturday evening, those cowpeas made up the main portion of the meal.

We also followed the Plantation's receipt for rice pudding for breakfast on Saturday morning---it was still excellent served cold on Sunday.

Mrs. Lawson,

No, I didn't make it to Perryville. I've read several posts concerning the town and activities and I'm sure I would have enjoyed them. You are first rate and its folks like yourself that make this hobby so interesting.

Gotta get them peas!

Phil Maddox