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goatgirl
10-26-2009, 10:40 AM
Since the discussion of the song “Dixie” on the Decent Bands thread http://www.cwreenactors.com/forum/showthread.php?t=15136 , I’ve given the song a lot of thought. It seems some folks consider it un-authentic to not sing all of Dan Emmett’s verses, particularly referring to the “Will the weaver” the “gay deceiver” verses.

Disliking “Dixie” altogether, singing only the first verses of Dan Emmett’s “Dixie,” singing his first verses combined with other Southern verses, or singing totally different words to the air “Dixie” are all documented period correct options. To borrow from and miss-quote “The song of the camp,” - “each heart recalled some different words, but all played ‘Dixie.’”

While I believe there is historical facts to back up anyone’s desire to omit the “Will the weaver/the gay deceiver” verses and only sing the verses “I wish I was in the land of cotton / Old times there are not forgotten,” I desire to be authentic, and have no wish for the other re-enactors to think of me as un-authentic in my choice of “Dixie” lyrics. So, after much grave thought and consideration, I have come to the conclusion to sing the following about the “gay deceiver”. . . .:

“You’ve heard of Abe, the gay deceiver
Who went to Sumter to reliever her
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land
But Beauregard said, “Save your bacon!
Sumter’s ours and must be taken!”
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land”

Ross L. Lamoreaux
10-26-2009, 10:44 AM
If you're singing that on your own time or with your own company, there is absolutely nothing wrong with changing the lyrics. It was a common practice of the time. I would, however, caution you about doing that around the public or fellow reenactors, as you're singing a modern song with no historical basis other than the melody. Its deceptive in the least, and its revisionist history at worst. Back then when folks were offended about a song or its lyrics, they just didn't sing them....

hanktrent
10-26-2009, 11:16 AM
It seems some folks consider it un-authentic to not sing all of Dan Emmett’s verses, particularly referring to the “Will the weaver” the “gay deceiver” verses.

Who said that? Could you point to the particular posts?

I think the discussion centered around consistency in modern moral choices, rather than evidence that everyone sang Dan Emmett's version of Dixie all the way through, each time they sang it in the 1860s.


Disliking “Dixie” altogether, singing only the first verses of Dan Emmett’s “Dixie,” singing his first verses combined with other Southern verses, or singing totally different words to the air “Dixie” are all documented period correct options.

Of course.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

goatgirl
10-26-2009, 11:32 AM
If you're singing that on your own time or with your own company, there is absolutely nothing wrong with changing the lyrics. It was a common practice of the time. I would, however, caution you about doing that around the public or fellow reenactors, as you're singing a modern song with no historical basis other than the melody. Its deceptive in the least, and its revisionist history at worst. Back then when folks were offended about a song or its lyrics, they just didn't sing them....

Mr. Lamoreaux,

If Mr. W. L. Fagan has not miss-lead his readers, of Southern War Songs Camp-Fire, Patriotic & Sentimental, than the "Bayou City Guard’s Dixie" by the “Company’s own poet” is not a modern song. It does have historical words “written in an era of war.” It would, however, perhaps be more period correct for the Bayou City re-enactors to sing this song just as Texas re-enactors might sing the Texan version of “Dixie” and the Georgia re-enactors might sing one written by a Georgian.

goatgirl
10-26-2009, 11:48 AM
Who said that? Could you point to the particular posts?

I think the discussion centered around consistency in modern moral choices, rather than evidence that everyone sang Dan Emmett's version of Dixie all the way through, each time they sang it in the 1860s.

It was not you, Mr. Trent. Even though we have different views on issues at times, I respect you for your historical knowledge and documentation. Here are the requested posts.

http://www.cwreenactors.com/forum/showpost.php?p=129754&postcount=31 and
http://www.cwreenactors.com/forum/showpost.php?p=130043&postcount=48

Ross L. Lamoreaux
10-26-2009, 12:05 PM
Mr. Lamoreaux,

If Mr. W. L. Fagan has not miss-lead his readers, of Southern War Songs Camp-Fire, Patriotic & Sentimental, than the "Bayou City Guard’s Dixie" by the “Company’s own poet” is not a modern song. It does have historical words “written in an era of war.” It would, however, perhaps be more period correct for the Bayou City re-enactors to sing this song just as Texas re-enactors might sing the Texan version of “Dixie” and the Georgia re-enactors might sing one written by a Georgian.

Thank you for the period citation. I was led to believe that you had written the lyrics in the first post since it was't cited there. My apologies! You are of course to free to sing any and all songs of your choosing, but I always side with the period rather than a modern rendition of anything, so you're right as rain either way with your version and source!

goatgirl
10-26-2009, 03:52 PM
Mr. Lamoreaux,

I apologize for leaving out the words “period verse” in “I have come to the conclusion to sing the following [period verse] about the ‘gay deceiver.’” There is no need to sing modern words to the air “Dixie” as there is ample period correct parodies. Which, in Henry Hotze estimation, “the poorest is an improvement on the original.”

Henry Hotze, “Three Months in the Confederate Army: The Tune of Dixie” in The Index. Quoted in Confederate Music by Richard B. Harwell

agrnbrt
10-26-2009, 07:21 PM
Dear 'goat girl',
Please tend to your flock and leave history alone. There are more than enough re writers of it around as it is. We do NOT need another.

Ross L. Lamoreaux
10-27-2009, 07:31 AM
I don't believe she's "re-writing history" at all, in fact, she has used historical references to back up her assertion that it is her right to pick and choose the music that she wishes to use. I made a poke at her choices to avoid bawdy music, but I was wrong for that, just as wrong as I was at picking at her desire to change the lyrics of a historical song. If she were using modern lyrics, that would be one thing, but she has shown, through research (something often lacking from emotional quick responses from some people) that it was done during the period. Anybody remember "Bonnie Blue Flag" and then another version to the same tune called "The Irish Volunteer"? Its her right and privilege to choose, just as much as it is ours to choose a side, a uniform jacket, or cotton versus wool socks. Heck, I even choose pie over cake....

eric marten
10-27-2009, 08:08 AM
Ross:

Are you sure? PIE OVER CAKE? Can you cite specific first hand sources, fully documented, according to regional origins? Must they be correct recipes, with or without trans fats? Were the rebels more likely to choose one over the other? What about border states and union states? Fresh fruit versus preserves in the blueberry pies, or German style blueberry cake?
Don't want to be embarrassed with inappropriate choices.

Eric Marten

goatgirl
10-27-2009, 09:01 AM
I don't believe she's "re-writing history" at all, in fact, she has used historical references to back up her assertion that it is her right to pick and choose the music that she wishes to use. I made a poke at her choices to avoid bawdy music, but I was wrong for that, just as wrong as I was at picking at her desire to change the lyrics of a historical song. If she were using modern lyrics, that would be one thing, but she has shown, through research (something often lacking from emotional quick responses from some people) that it was done during the period. Anybody remember "Bonnie Blue Flag" and then another version to the same tune called "The Irish Volunteer"? Its her right and privilege to choose, just as much as it is ours to choose a side, a uniform jacket, or cotton versus wool socks. Heck, I even choose pie over cake....

Thank you, Mr. Lamoreaux, I appreciate your post. I can take being picked on for my beliefs. Why, its period correct to be taunted!! However, it is grating when someone asserts that my moral choices conflicts with authenticity, because that is simply not true.

eric marten
10-27-2009, 09:40 AM
Nicole, and Ross:

I totally agree with you. This is an educational hobby, not a life struggle. I hope you realize that my reply was meant to be satire, to reinforce that. And, Nicole, I appreciate your references from the Scriptures. We could all use more of that, in re-enacting and in our modern time of war.

Eric Marten

plankmaker
10-27-2009, 11:50 AM
OK, this has been hashed out, we needs to get to an important topic like food.

Mark Campbell
Piney Flats, TN

Oral History Interview with James and Nannie Pharis, December 5, 1978; January 8 and 30, 1979. Interview H-0039. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Full Text of the Excerpt
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did they preserve a lot of things in cans?
NANNIE PHARIS:
In stone jars, mostly then. The glass canning jars hadn't come in when I was growing up.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would people use real metal cans?
NANNIE PHARIS:
Stone jars. They'd have a tight lid on them. My mother used to pack sausage in them stone jars. We'd get ice off of the river, enough to last us during the summer. And we'd put these jars where they'd keep cool. And it was just as good as it could be.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where would you put them?
NANNIE PHARIS:
Where we put the ice and packed it. Have a cave dug and fill it full of ice. Take it out and use it when we wanted to.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Ice, could you keep it two or three months?
NANNIE PHARIS:
Oh, it would stay most of the summer. We'd try to get enough to do us the summer.
JAMES PHARIS:
Back in them days ice froze that thick.
NANNIE PHARIS:
See, you'd get it off of the river and it would be six or seven inches thick. How you would see them haul it. To get it out you'd have to rinse the dirt off it. Packed straw. That's old time living.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You could put most anything in these stoneware….
NANNIE PHARIS:
Yes, you could. Make all kind of preserves and pack them there. We'd have to keep them on ice because they be preserved in the sugar and the syrup, you know.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What size of containers would these things be?
NANNIE PHARIS:
Different sizes. Some of them would be five gallon churns. My daughter's got one now.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would you put five gallons worth of preserves in them?
NANNIE PHARIS:
Yes. A big family that wouldn't go very far. There was a sweet apple that didn't come apart when you preserved it. It used to make awful good preserves, and we'd make an awful lot of those. And peaches. They wasn't as numerous then as they are nowadays. Peaches was very scarce. Had a lot of plums. Blackberries. Had these old time fields of strawberries. You'd go out in the field and pick those strawberries.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When do you remember the glass jars starting?
NANNIE PHARIS:
I reckon it was right after we married. I don't know exactly. I was housekeeping and I'd can stuff in it and it would spoil because they didn't have the tight lids they had nowadays. But they grew to that, and I done a lot of canning.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How would you can when you first began using the glass jars?
NANNIE PHARIS:
Well, we'd seal them. Two pieces, a rubber ring to put around the jar and then you'd screw a zinc top on it as tight as you could get it. But there wasn't no boiling in the can them days, but there is now. I've got a canner out there now that I've used for fifteen or twenty years, that you process it in the jars. But they didn't have that them days. Some of the vegetables would keep very well and some would spoil. So we had to take our chances. They were right green, they wasn't clear like they are nowadays.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where would you buy your stone containers?
NANNIE PHARIS:
I don't know where my mother and father got those. They had a place they made them.
ALLEN TULLOS:
A pottery?
NANNIE PHARIS:
. People had things to work with then. They was smart but they didn't have too much to do with.
ALLEN TULLOS:
So you think the jars would be bought from a potter?
NANNIE PHARIS:
I don't know where they come from. They must have been made like that. My daughter has one that I had fifty years.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When you started buying your glass jars, where would you buy those?
NANNIE PHARIS:
At the grocery store.
ALLEN TULLOS:
It would just be like a regular general store, a grocery store.
NANNIE PHARIS:
That's right. They kept all kind of pottery, jars, and frying pans and things like that.

goatgirl
10-27-2009, 12:45 PM
Mr. Marten, I understood your satirical post. . . .‘Tis a pity frozen Peanut Butter Pie is not period correct because it is so good. We sat down with Ohio friends and shared it with Northerners in perfect company this summer, not at a re-enactment, of course.

agrnbrt
10-27-2009, 04:44 PM
I don't believe she's "re-writing history" at all, in fact, she has used historical references to back up her assertion that it is her right to pick and choose the music that she wishes to use. I made a poke at her choices to avoid bawdy music, but I was wrong for that, just as wrong as I was at picking at her desire to change the lyrics of a historical song. If she were using modern lyrics, that would be one thing, but she has shown, through research (something often lacking from emotional quick responses from some people) that it was done during the period. Anybody remember "Bonnie Blue Flag" and then another version to the same tune called "The Irish Volunteer"? Its her right and privilege to choose, just as much as it is ours to choose a side, a uniform jacket, or cotton versus wool socks. Heck, I even choose pie over cake....

When did we all become appologists?...oh yeah right after Lincoln got elected.
And that how this whole war thing started.

50th vice pres
10-27-2009, 08:14 PM
i apoligize for agrnbrt for not appoligizing for his jumping to the conclusion that what goatgirl wrote wasnt founded on any research. it has been proven likewise.

agrnbrt
10-28-2009, 06:32 PM
i apoligize for agrnbrt for not appoligizing for his jumping to the conclusion that what goatgirl wrote wasnt founded on any research. it has been proven likewise.

Please don't.

Linda Trent
10-29-2009, 04:58 PM
Has anyone ever seen any attempt to explain what the "Will, the weaver" verses referred to? I don't mean, what did they mean, but were they just a random story, or were they an incident that really occurred, or an answer to some other song? Sort of like Steven Foster's "Why No One to Love" which was in answer to a popular song "No One to Love."

Gay deceivers, and hatchet faced, appear to be pretty common terms of the period, and appear in literature and poetry well before Dixie became a song. Now granted Dixie was a minstrel tune and a lot of them aren't really meant to be analyzed. "Will, the weaver" did show up in Shakespeare, and was the name of a British horse foaled in 1828, the name also appeared in Robin Hood: a collection of all the ancient poems, songs, and ballads... Relative to that Celebrated Outlaw, 1832 (http://books.google.com/books?id=itkIAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA214). The latter reads:

"Then out stept Will the weaver,
And he swore he'd not leave her..."

Of course all of these are British. Are there any American accounts? Yes, I have checked Google books. :-D

Perhaps Dixie is a song not to be analyzed, but occasionally by analyzing things we learn something about the time period. For example, most of us are familiar with the chorus of the "Old King Crow (http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/levy-cgi/display.cgi?id=020.107.002;pages=4;range=0-3)." :p I have it's publication date as 1847, and yet in The Knickerbocker Magazine in 1845 (http://books.google.com/books?id=G8QGAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA333)has an interesting article on minstrel music that includes the following quote,


[Sambo] calls out, at the top of his voice:

"Jenny get your hoe-cake done, my darling,
Jenny get your hoe-cake done, my dear."

and Jenny, in her distant log hut... answers her beloved Sambo in the same strain:

De hoe-cake is almost done my darling,
De hoe-cake is almost done, my dear.

So what I find interesting here is that apparently the Jenny fetch a hoe-cake meant something even before the Old King Crow. :cool:

Another thing that I also found in the article was that minstrel music was something that everyone enjoyed rich or poor, male or female. Here's another quote from the same article.


From the nobility and gentry, down to the lowest chimney-sweep in Great Britain, and from the member of Congress, down to the youngest apprentice or school-boy in America, it was all:

"Turn about and wheel about, and do just so,
And every time I turn about I jump Jim Crow."

Even the fair sex did not escape the contagion: the tunes were set to music for the piano-forte, and nearly every young lady in the Union [remember this is 1845, so they mean U.S.] and the United Kingdom, played and sang, if she did not jump, 'Jim Crow.' 'Zip Coon' became a fashionable song; 'Lubly Rosa, Sambo come,' the favorite serenade, and 'Dandy Jim of Caroline' the established quadrille-music...

Wow, I went a little bit of everywhere with this. :twisted: Sorry, for the drifting thoughts.

What this was really all about is, has anyone ever researched out the lyrics of Dixie to see if they had any deeper meaning?

BTW, moderators are more than welcome to start a new thread, or if anyone wants to split off a new thread to cover anything other than Dixie that's fine with me.

Linda.

goatgirl
10-29-2009, 07:24 PM
What this was really all about is, has anyone ever researched out the lyrics of Dixie to see if they had any deeper meaning?

Ah, well Madam, some lady in 1861 sent the following, if not “deeper meaning,” certainly a very imaginative meaning to the Richmond Dispatch:

The Enigma Solved.

"The owner of the copy-right of Dixie's Land has realized $4,000 by the sale of that song." This item of intelligence, which has gone the rounds of the newspapers, excited some surprise in the minds of those who simply consider Dixie’s Land a song like other songs. "The air is pretty enough," they say, "but the words — why, they are perfectly absurd! What can have given it such a sale?" . . .

"And the words of that song. With feelings of unaffected hesitation and genuine reverence do I approach the discussion of this delicate subject. I crave the earnest attention of all true Southerners to the great discovery I am about to make public. That poem, lightly denounced as "meaningless" and "absurd" by unimaginative Submissionists and taunting Republicans--that poem is an allegorical prophecy, quelling suspicion of its true character by apparent literalness, but in reality profound, exact and awe-inspiring as the mysterious oracles of ancient sibyls, the wonderful "second-sight" revelations of Thomas the Rhymer and other Caledonian seers, or the still more amazing predictions of Merlin, which, delivered in King Arthur's time, are being even now fulfilled in England.

I do not speak unadvisedly or without being able to bring ample proof of the truth of my assertion. A very cursory examination of the song itself will be sufficient to convince any unprejudiced mind of its allegorical shape; and when it is considered that the words were composed more than a year ago, when the events to which it so evidently refers were yet in the womb of the future, and the man, whose star has now risen triumphantly above the political horizon, had scarcely been heard of beyond his own narrow circle, its prophetic character will appear undeniable.

To begin the analysis: The first verse simply, but forcibly, recalls to the mind of a Southerner on a foreign shore, "his own, his native land," where his childhood's happy days were spent; where the endearing ties of memory and association are still remembered; and then in the spirit of Allan Cunningham's well-known lines:--
"It's hame, hame, hame, that I fain would be — Hame, hame, hame, in my ain countrie;"
the chorus bursts forth with a passionate wish to return to this beloved motherland; an earnest resolve to live and die in her bosom. This first verse is literal, and serves as a further mask to the obscurities which follow.

Now begins the allegory:
"Old mistress married Will, the Weaver, William he was a gay deceiver-- Look away — look away, look away, Dixie Land!"

Here is wisdom. The figurative "old mistress" is Columbia, no longer, alas! a happy land, who, with blind confidence, places her fate in the hands of — of whom? Who is the second metaphorical personage? No other than Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States. The significant title, "Weaver," has been, from time immemorial, applied to spiders, and from them transferred to politicians--"weavers" of cunning plots.
The name, William, is added partly for the sake of alliteration, and partly (as in Scriptural prophecies dynasties are mentioned as single kings,) to unite into one person, influenced by the same motives, resolved to carry out the same line of conduct, the President and his principal adviser, his guiding spirit, whose given name, singularly enough it really is, and in a secondary sense, the whole Republican party is implied by that phrase.

This artful schemer's moral character is then summed up in one comprehensive phrase, which needs no comment; and the Southland is entreated to turn away her eyes from the sad spectacle of misplaced confidence — of affection doomed to base betrayal. Next follows a terse description of the fierceness of his countenance — the outward sign of a ferocious and pitiless disposition.

"This face was as sharp," &c.
The dark threats of coming storm — the warnings of approaching danger, which alarm all around her, are unnoticed, unfeared by the infatuated Columbia. And again the chorus peals out that longing patriotic cry — again avows that bold determination to stand by our altars and our fires — to die, if fate wills it, for our sunny land.
Sudden and awful is Columbia's awakening from her dream of peace and repose, when she is irrevocably in the power of her terrible master, whose very smile is as dreadful as the flash of a cannon. Aye! look a way, hapless children of a doomed mother! In her is no help! Protect yourselves! Raise your own banner! Keep your oft-reiterated vow to stand fast by your laws and liberties!

And then comes the catastrophe. Cold and pale, at last, lies the noble form of Columbia, victim of an ill-assorted union, of infatuated trust in designing politicians. Sadly to the sky still rises the wailing refrain--
"Look away,--look away,--look away, Dixie Land."

But for us who survive, better days are dawning, Secessia, benignant goddess! smiles on our standard and stretches her protecting [?] over us. In the concluding couplet of the lay with which she has inspired her chosen bard, (for he "builded better than he knew, " and but dimly understood the vast import of his verses,) she assumes the protection of the South,--not only of the States who first invoked her aid, but of all others who may join them. A mistress of a different stamp from Columbia will this new protectress be. No divided counsels, no clashing interests mark her regime. Her cool-headed statesmen will legislate with dignified wisdom in the halls of her Capitol. Her soldiers, whose fame is above suspicion, and her sagacious and experienced military engineers, will guard her well-fortified coasts. Where is the doomed foe who shall dare attack them?

"Now, here's a health to the next old Missus And to all the gals that want to kiss us!"
Virginia! Kentucky! Tennessee! Will you not join your sisters? Do you not yearn to bestow upon them an embrace of sisterly love? Will you not fly from the baleful sway of
William the Weaver, and take refuge in Secessia's open arms?

"in Dixie’s Land take up your stand, To live and die in Dixie."
Can any one now fail to see that, in the verses of this deservedly popular song, an epitome is given of the events which, since last November, have shaken this land? The election of Lincoln, the decay and dismemberment of the United States, the threats of civil war, and the rise of a new power in the South, are all foretold, and even an invitation to join this nascent empire extended to the surrounding States! The most skeptical must at least confess that these verses contain such an extraordinary series of coincidences as was never before heaped together by the hand of chance. There are those, we are told, in Secessia's own domain — some even in the eloquent Preston's gallant little State--who doubt Secessia's infallibility, and secretly acknowledge the Weaver's right to rule over them, though public opinion obliges them to wrap their views in such a mantle of dubiously as this adapted epigram expresses:
"God bless our President the South's defender! God bless — no harm in blessing the Pretender! Which that pretender is — Davis or Lincoln, bless us all!--is quite another thing!"

(Pardon, shade of Byrom!)

Surely, these double-dealing malcontents cannot now listen to the spirit-stirring strains of Dixie, or recall the immortal verse to which that noble air is united, without yielding to the conviction that Secessia must be, because she was foretold. Let them, then, throw off the hateful mask, cast aside all doubts, all fears, and bravely espouse the good cause.
May Secessia's real character, her aims and tendencies, become widely known, as they deserve to be; and may the great people of the Southern and the Border States join heart and hand to resist the wiles of scheming politicians, who would betray and enslave them."

Linda Trent
10-29-2009, 10:00 PM
Ah, well Madam, some lady in 1861 sent the following, if not “deeper meaning,” certainly a very imaginative meaning to the Richmond Dispatch:

Very interesting indeed. I did try searching the Richmond paper, but just under the name 'Dixie,' and there were too many hits. I tried to glance over them, but... I missed this one. So thank you. It really is cool to see a Southerner's view of it.

I'd love to also see it from a Northern perspective, too, since it was written by Dan Emmett. I just found this a short while ago, and it's the closest I've been able to come so far, but it's post war. Several sites have some stuff that Dan Emmett supposedly said about writing it. One story is that he knew a former slave who told the story of a romance between Old Missus and Will, the weaver. Emmett put it in his song and the rest is history, or so that story said. ;)

For what it's worth, here's a source from 1864 that seems to agree with the last paragraph. Forty years of American Life, Vol. 1
Some of these airs have a very singular character. There is 'Dixie's Land,' for example. I do not know its origin, but am inclined to believe its germ, at least, was negro, and that it came from the South.

Linda.

Linda Trent
10-30-2009, 11:05 AM
BTW, I realized that I was only checking Google books for the war years and before. But here's a report of an interview with the author (Dan Emmett) that even includes a facsimile of the original song. This is rather lengthy, and since it includes a copy of the original, well I'll let you all read it rather than summarize it. It's from The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, October 1895, p. 958.

One thing that I find interesting is it starts out
I wish I was in de land ob cotton
'Cimmon seed and sandy bottom.

Those are the same words as shown on the Levy Sheet music site. However, if one doesn't like the words to the original Dixie they can always sing this fiery Southern version written in Martinsburg, [W]VA, December 1861, entitled "The Song of the Exile," sung to the tune of Dixie. See Levy sheet music (http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/levy-search.html) You'll have to put in the search box "Dixie's Land," and I believe that both versions will come up. Sorry, but Levy wouldn't let me link the actual song.

I do find it interesting that Emmett told the author of the article that "when the cold wintry days of the North set in, all minstrels had a great desire to go south, that is to 'Dixie's Land.' On a cold day a common saying was 'Oh, I wish I was in Dixie's Land!'" Hey, we pretty much still say that today! 8)

Anyway, here's the link to the Century Illustrated: http://books.google.com/books?id=DXgAAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA958

Linda.