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ElizabethClark
09-01-2006, 09:00 AM
It's one degree above freezing this morning, and I suppose that's got me thinking "Autumn". :)

What activities or projects are you working on to support and develop living history in your local area?

For us, things are sparse in our area if you're not into SCA time periods (and it's pretty sparse even then). One of my goals is to get with a core group of young people I worked with this past spring, do some clothing workshops, and see about getting a mid-century caroling opportunity going for the holidays.

NoahBriggs
09-01-2006, 09:35 AM
AGSAS Costume Ball at Bel Air Mansion, Sept. 9, 2006. Proceeds go to Beauvoir's FixIt bill.

Dressing up as a Victorian dressing up as something else, and their interpretation may be rather . . . interesting. What better way to play "dress-up"? And no guns or military anything, either. :)

celtfiddler
09-01-2006, 10:33 AM
Nothing at the present time. Between injury, illness, and gearing up to move for the third time in three years (it's just a matter of the Navy telling us where) it's kind of put a crimp in doing things.

Georgia Parson
09-01-2006, 11:44 AM
September 4, 2006~Labor Day Folklife Celebration

We will celebrate old-time labor on the plantation with chores of the 19th century; blacksmithing, spinning, woodstove cooking, etc.
Jarrell Plantation is a complex that contains 20 historic buildings on 48 acres that once was a self-sufficient working farm north of Macon, Georgia.
Settled by the Jarrell family in the 1840's, the main residence contains original 19th century furnishings, including looms, spinning wheels and a cobblers bench.
Wife and I will probably pitch some hay, haul some water, sew and mend, and display 19th Century Toys and Amusements for the children.

Wish it were going to be one degree above freezing!

Regards...

Georgia Parson
09-01-2006, 11:49 AM
Sorry, the title line should have read Support and Development. Mid day brain mush!

Regards...

Linda Trent
09-01-2006, 01:02 PM
What activities or projects are you working on to support and develop living history in your local area?

Well, it all depends upon what one calls local. I call local anything within a 5 hour drive :)

Currently I'm preparing for Ohio Village, followed by Shaker Village, followed by an 1888 event in Gettysburg (small/private event), then I'll be shifting my attention over to 2007 and my big event, the 1864 Court/Trial.

So after November most all my time will be spent traveling Ohio, WV, and KY at courthouses and law libraries researching period trials, courtroom etiquette, different cases similar to what we'll be trying, how cases were argued...

I found in the Sept. 5, 1864, issue of the Frankfort Commonwealth my Xmas wish list that includes an advertisement that had been running for a while:


Law Books and Blanks For Sale at Commonwealth Office.

Monroe & Harlan's Digest of the Decisions of the Court of Appeals, 2 vols.

Revised Statutes of Kentucky 1 vol.

Debates of the Convention 1 vol.

Guide to Justices, Clerks, Sheriffs &c., by John C. Herndon 1 vol.

The General Acts of Session 1855-6, pamphlet form.

Loughborough's Digest of the Statutes 1 vol.

Of course there are also several excellent books on the internet that I will also be reading, and I'm sure once we start looking at the special collections of Kentucky law libraries we'll probably find lots of other great stuff too!

Between having to learn about 1888 and the Court, I don't have much time for delving into much of anything else. :rolleyes:

BobSullivanPress
09-01-2006, 02:54 PM
Linda,

There evidently was a series of "do-it-yourself" law books printed in the 1850s and 60s. The author was Delos Beadle, and the books are titled "American Lawyer and Form book". They are either for self-styled lawyers, or for country lawyers who are trying to learn how to practice law. Here's an ebay link to one:

http://cgi.ebay.com/AMERICAN-LAWYER-FORM-BOOK-DELOS-BEADLE-1860_W0QQitemZ6931670585QQihZ014QQcategoryZ29223QQ ssPageNameZWD1VQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

They come on Ebay fairly regularly, and not all are as expensive as this one. I got one from 1858 (I believe) for about $8 two years ago.

Bob Sullivan

Linda Trent
09-01-2006, 05:14 PM
Linda,There evidently was a series of "do-it-yourself" law books printed in the 1850s and 60s. The author was Delos Beadle, and the books are titled "American Lawyer and Form book". They are either for self-styled lawyers, or for country lawyers who are trying to learn how to practice law. Bob Sullivan

Cool, it sounds like a great book! Since you have a copy can you tell me if there's much in there on criminal court (embezzlement, horse theft, grand larceny, possession of counterfeit money, murder, etc.) Or is it mostly for making out business papers, wills, and that sort of thing?

Since there's going to be a pre-court event where the crime will take place, we aren't at liberty to divulge what the crime will be, who's going to be the accused/victim, etc. (all I'll say is it's not me or Hank, as we have other duties at the trial event).

We'll have one civil case and one criminal case. The latter is expected to go on all day and probably into the next. It's the criminal case that's going to require the ton of research. But the research is worth it when we watch it all unfold, in context, at the event. :D

Thanks,

Linda

tompritchett
09-01-2006, 06:13 PM
Linda, might I suggest that you send Bob a PM to find out if the book covers the crime. I am sure you can trust Bob to keep your request confidental.

MissMaggie
09-02-2006, 04:15 AM
Mrs Clark,
With school starting on Tuesday again my main goal is just to get to an event or two. Thats about all I can hope for between now and when the semester ends in January. However, since I'm studying costume production (Yes, When I graduate I will have a BFA in Costume Production) I will be learning all sorts of fun sewing techniques, pattern drafting, milinery, costume history, and pattern draping this year. Next year comes tailoring, painting and dying fabric, costume design, and advanced pattern drafting and draping. So have I made anyone jealous yet??

netnet81
09-02-2006, 08:02 AM
We are having an EFBU civilian event in November at a site with several historic houses. We're taking over the site for the weekend. Local is a relative term in Texas, but the site is pretty much within an hour and a half for most participants. This will be one of the first such events in our area and we're all very excited about it.

cookiemom
09-02-2006, 08:46 AM
Mrs Clark,
With school starting on Tuesday again my main goal is just to get to an event or two. Thats about all I can hope for between now and when the semester ends in January. However, since I'm studying costume production (Yes, When I graduate I will have a BFA in Costume Production) I will be learning all sorts of fun sewing techniques, pattern drafting, milinery, costume history, and pattern draping this year. Next year comes tailoring, painting and dying fabric, costume design, and advanced pattern drafting and draping. So have I made anyone jealous yet??
Yes! (...as unattractive as it is to admit it. :( ) It sounds like you'll be very busy, but having the time of your life!

I hope you have a great semester!

ElizabethClark
09-02-2006, 10:24 AM
Heh heh--what, jealous of set-aside time to actually work on sewing? Naaaahhhhh... LOL :) Maggie, have a ton of fun with your studies. You'll find a whole lot of differences in Stage and Fashion costuming compared to Historic clothing--the draping principles will apply across lots of eras, though, and YES, I'm jealous on the tailoring front.

What events are you prepping for?

Annette, what's on the agenda for the Historic Home Invasion Weekend? :) I hope you'll post an AAR?

"Close" and "local" are relative up here, too... the 8 hour drive to particpate at Fort Bridger in June was "local." :) With winter setting in, though, there will be weeks we won't be able to drive down to Blackfoot (25 miles) even if we wanted to, as the freeways will close, so I'm eager to promote some LOCAL local activities. This spring, I helped with clothing for a handcart trek with a bunch of teens, and several of them (girls and guys) seem to have been hooked by the history part of it. I'm very excited about the possibility of a group of teens who want to do history stuff here! (And, I know most of them from community theater and my stint as a choir director, so I know the costumed historic caroling will work--I've heard them sing.)

netnet81
09-02-2006, 03:51 PM
[QUOTE=ElizabethClark]
Annette, what's on the agenda for the Historic Home Invasion Weekend? :) I hope you'll post an AAR?

Yes, I'll post an AAR if you wish. This is the first I've planned and the first I think most of the participants have attended. This type of thing is not too prevalent in Texas as we don't have the sites available as in the east and mid-west. Unless you count the forts :).

The site is a collection of about 9 structures 3 of which are in their original locations. We will have full access to the structures and be allowed to live there for the weekend. There will be a few modern intrusions like electrical lines, visible cars, one historic marker and the biggest issue...the noon siren from the volunteer fire department across the street :). But, the site is the best we have in the area for this type of event with the kind of access we want to the structures.

It will be November 1862 and the militia will be activated during the event. We have a surprising number of men joining us in civilian capacity, at least to start, as the militia will be called up most will probably end up drilling. The area was the CSA recruiting station for the county. There are some "scenarios" but mainly the idea for the weekend is to play it out as it comes and to really see if there is a need and desire for such an event here in Texas.

That's probably more than you wanted to know. I'm very excited and we're having a fairly good turn out for registration.

Grits
09-11-2006, 12:21 PM
Our local history society (Maury Co. TN) is sponsoring a first time event this weekend. I am a member of a tatting (lacemaking) group and several of us reenact and will be setting up a display. I've also heard that a spinner, blacksmith, wood turners and others are coming. It's a two-day event with Friday being a school day. They are expecing about 700 school children to come through. It should be fun!

Beth
a.k.a. Grits

cookiemom
09-18-2006, 09:11 AM
Open hearth cooking workshop on Oct. 21, 2006, at Riversdale House Museum.

Riversdale, a National Historic Landmark, was built between 1801 and 1807, and was the home of Rosalie and George Calvert (grandson of the fifth Lord Baltimore.) Their son, Charles, founded the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland, College Park, which occupies land formerly belonging to the estate.)

Local? I guess I'm "spoiled" -- I could walk to it.

Grits
09-20-2006, 09:27 AM
Elizabeth,

Our county historical society just had a wonderful living history event this past weekend. For a first time event, it was pretty good and well attended. It was called "A Walk Through Maury County History." We had mostly CW reenactors but there was a few Colonial and one Longhunter there. It was so much fun and we had over 700 school children come through on Friday. When I get my photos back, I'll post some of them. You can see the poster from the event at http://historicmaury.org/ and then click on "Calendar of Events".

BTW, did you know that your website is down? I was interested in your doll kit I once saw.

Have a blessed day!

Beth
a.k.a Grits

ElizabethClark
09-20-2006, 05:50 PM
Yes, we're moving to new (better) servers, so things will be up and down sporadically for the next several days. Feel free to use my "chat" email and I'll get you any details you need on the dolls. elizabethstewartclark@hotmail.com (And that offer is open to anyone who needs to get through to me in the next week or so... it takes awhile to get our emails set back up when the site moves.)