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goatgirl
08-15-2009, 08:16 PM
Does anyone have any recommendation for decent CW bands which have fiddle music and good traditional style playing (preferably Southern songs)? I have become reluctant to purchase CDs due to some of the obnoxious songs many of the popular groups play. One of the bands I really like their style of playing, but we erased “Rosin the Beau” off their tape. Listening to songs promoting drinking is not my kind of songs. It can be hard to judge just by reading the title lists. I scanned the title of a CD from another of the popular bands and only one or two of them sounded like I would need to skip over them. As it turned out, I listened to the CD one time and that is all. There were numerous songs on there that were disgraceful. “Banks of the Ohio” sounded harmless enough. . .After hearing the words though, I do not get any enjoyment out of hearing about a rogue murder his “wouldn’t be wife.”

One of the members of the above referenced bands teased me about making a child friendly CD. I wish some group would, if there is not any already. I am looking for a CD which preferably plays “Civil War” songs - Dixie, The Vacant Chair, Battle of Shiloh, Goober Peas, etc. If they have other songs from the era, they should be morally good songs such as “Stay on the Farm, Boys.” If they are “sweetheart” songs, they should be decent songs like, “When you and I Were Young, Maggie.” (Written in 1866, that is actually post war.) Any recommendations?

Ross L. Lamoreaux
08-15-2009, 10:14 PM
97th Regimental Stringband. Great musicians all, incredible lead singer in Mad Dog Luce, 7 Cd's to choose from, but if drinking songs bother you, don't get the sea chanty CD.

Yellowhammer Rebel
08-16-2009, 12:42 AM
97th Regimental String Band is by far and away my favorite (and has been for many years). Another great band that I would recommend is Unreconstructed. They are a great band and my second favorite. They have a fiddle player, guitarist, and a hammer (I think) dulcimer player that goes with them to events. When they do the dances they usually have a bass player as well.

Elaine Kessinger
08-16-2009, 11:39 AM
Two of my favorite groups are the 2nd South Carolina String Band and Kent Courtney.
I hear 2nd South Carolina String Band at many events. They do minstrel favorites and patriotic favorites. http://www.civilwarband.com/
Kent Courtney is a professional minstrel and historian. He's heard on the radio local to me as well as podcasts, TV spots, and small local events. http://www.livinghistorymusic.com/Civil_War_Music.htm

Here's a link to a database of song lyrics by title. Understand though, that during this era, many, many songs had varying lyrics and there may be hundreds of different versions. Hopefully it will help you to make informed choices. http://freepages.music.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~edgmon/civilwar.htm

Good luck.

celtfiddler
08-16-2009, 06:19 PM
Check out the Susquehanna Travellers music.

A good place to search for Civil War music is cdbaby.com. You can preview a lot of the music they have available and the prices are reasonable.

Company Fiddler
08-17-2009, 09:47 AM
Madam,

A group that I believe fills your requirements is, Hardtack & Harmony. They are a group of Canadian re-enactors who portray the 10th Louisiana, CO. C.

goatgirl
08-17-2009, 07:42 PM
Thank y’all for your suggestions.

Jubilo
08-18-2009, 06:58 AM
Dear Madame,
If you provide a mailing address I will send you a BATLEFIELD BALLADEERS CD. No fiddle on this particular one but otherwise it seems to meet most of your requirements.email me at corbettrex@MSN.com.
all for the old flag,
David Corbett

goatgirl
08-18-2009, 09:54 AM
Mr. David Corbett,

Have sent you an e-mail.

Thanks,
Nicole

Silas
08-19-2009, 12:04 AM
http://www.myspace.com/camptownshakers

dculgan
08-19-2009, 07:04 AM
Thanks for the mention but I could not recommend any of our recordings to the young lady because we make a lot of references to gambling, drinking, tobacco, and other vices of the period best not mentioned in polite society.
Dave Culgan
Camptown Shakers

goatgirl
08-19-2009, 08:21 AM
Ah, honesty, blessed ,wonderful honesty. I can appreciate your honesty even if I can’t appreciate the kind of songs y’all play.

Silas
08-19-2009, 09:12 AM
I appreciate solid musicians with honest sound. The commencer of this thread may not appreciate such a quality group, but others certainly will.

As for one of the songs, are you saying that Way Down the Ol' Plank Road isn't a temperance song? Sounds like one to me. I've looked for that songsheet without success.

RJSamp
08-19-2009, 02:20 PM
I've looked for that songsheet without success.

Well there's MP3's, a banjo tab, a guitar tab, video's et al up on the web......
here's a songsheet:
http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/049843/details.html

Maybe you can find the "Old-Time String Band Song Book" from an American vendor?

$20 up on Amazon.com

HG blacksmith
08-25-2009, 08:26 PM
I appreciate solid musicians with honest sound. The commencer of this thread may not appreciate such a quality group, but others certainly will.

The commencer of this thread is a good Christian Lady who desires to guard her ears from songs with a less than reputable theme.

I too (as a beginner mandolin player) can appreciate "solid musicians with honest sound" HOWEVER, if they are playing songs with themes of evil then they are not properly using the talents God has given them. (In my opinion! You are free to yours as well! :D)....regardless of the authenticity of the songs.

Miss Nicole, I've heard the 52nd or 57th Tenn. once. (Not sure the regimental number!) They sounded pretty good, BUT I only heard them once so I can't say what their CD is like. They have a new one that is medleys they use for balls. I have scanned the back of that one and it seems ok. Not sure though. I do know they sounded good and I think they had a fiddler too!

Dave

hanktrent
08-25-2009, 10:35 PM
I am looking for a CD which preferably plays “Civil War” songs - Dixie, The Vacant Chair, Battle of Shiloh, Goober Peas, etc. If they have other songs from the era, they should be morally good songs

Well, I've hesitated posting on this thread because I couldn't help out with the original request, but since there have been several useful suggestions, I'll ask what's been bugging me since I read the original post.

How did "Dixie" get on the okay list? It's about a man who marries a woman, apparently planning even as he was courting her to desert her and break her heart, and somehow (not exactly explained) she winds up dead. It's certainly not as bad as the explicit murder in "On the Banks of the Ohio," but it doesn't strike me as exactly the best Christian (or even non-Christian) example to follow, either. :confused:

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

FloridaConfederate
08-26-2009, 07:16 AM
My God is a "campainger" and grants historical exemptions in the spirit of accuracy.

Chris Rideout
Tampa, FLorida

hanktrent
08-26-2009, 08:05 AM
My God is a "campainger" and grants historical exemptions in the spirit of accuracy.

Chris Rideout
Tampa, FLorida

Well, when it comes to ethics or morality, I'm more concerned about how I or others actually treat people, than what kind of songs I or they listen to, but if one does want to avoid even hearing about immoral things, Will the weaver isn't exactly a role model. :D

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

goatgirl
08-26-2009, 08:41 AM
Miss Nicole, I've heard the 52nd or 57th Tenn. once. (Not sure the regimental number!) They sounded pretty good, BUT I only heard them once so I can't say what their CD is like. They have a new one that is medleys they use for balls. I have scanned the back of that one and it seems ok. Not sure though. I do know they sounded good and I think they had a fiddler too!
Dave

That might get them a “worth looking into.” :)



How did "Dixie" get on the okay list?
hanktrent@gmail.com

I’ve heard as many different versions of “Dixie” as I have groups that played it. No, I don’t like the one about “Will the deceiver.” Not only are there different verses, there are different “Dixie” or "Dixie's Land" songs as well.

PMB1861
08-26-2009, 03:40 PM
I too (as a beginner mandolin player) can appreciate "solid musicians with honest sound" HOWEVER, if they are playing songs with themes of evil then they are not properly using the talents God has given them. (In my opinion! You are free to yours as well! :D)....regardless of the authenticity of the songs.

A religious justification for being a farb. Now, I have seen everything.

Sir, if you don't get that playing those common folk songs is a way of honoring our ancestors now and that even then they were in many way written to point out the pit falls and danger of vice, then please don't pontificate on what is proper use of the talent's the Lord has passed on to us.

33rdaladrummer
08-26-2009, 04:12 PM
The following article must refer to Dan Emmett's original lyrics which were written prior to Albert Pike's more patriotic and less racy version:

Richmond Dispatch, 5/11/1861, p. 1

National Anthems. – A friend writes to express his pleasure at the ingenuity displayed by a fair correspondent of the Dispatch, on a recent occasion, in endeavoring to prove that the song of “Dixie Land” of right should become the National refrain of the Southern Confederacy. He says she is error when she asserts that the melody is of Northern manufacture. It is purely Southern, and just as purely negro – being a stevadore’s song, or chaunt, which for many years past has been bellowed on the wharves and levees of Southern cities, quite as common as the “unwritten music” of “Shinbone Alley,” “Ho, boys, you ‘most done,” and “Down Below.” It is one of those melodies whose parentage cannot be traced, and whose spontaneous birth defies the researches of the historian. Like many others of the same stamp, it has been caught up by the composers for the “burnt cork opera,” and so burnished up and remodeled as to deceive the modern connoisseur, though older ones can detect its nativity. He adds: “I make no objections to the tune – it is bold and even pleasing; yet it smells too strongly of the ******* to assume the dignified rank of National song. And the words, notwithstanding the prophetic virtue given them by your lady correspondent, what are they? Mere doggerel stuff, from the brain of some natural poet, away down in Dixie – ‘that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns,’ because no one as yet has ever reached it.”

We have no really national airs. “Yankee Doodle” is an unmeaning melody of foreign origin. As our correspondent says, it was played in derision of the Americans, by the British fifers during the Revolutionary war. – Its true origin is from an unsuccessful oratorio, entitled “Ulysses,” composed by William Smith. “Hail Columbia,” originally the old “President’s March,” was composed by the German leader of the band at Trenton, after the battle. The “Star Spangled Banner is the old Irish tune of Bibo. The more modern song, so popular with the Unionists, “Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean,” claims its origins from John Bull. Its transatlantic title was “Brittania, thou Gem of the Ocean.” “Our Flag is There,” another song tending towards nationality, is said to have been composed in South America.

Our National melodies should possess a distinct character of their own; but, if we are to depend on any people for their caste, let it not be the untutored son of Africa – the distorter of old Scotch and Irish tunes given to the world in the palmy days of the bards and harpers. If the Confederate States require a National anthem, let them adopt one of pure origin – one that will not be ashamed of its parentage.

HG blacksmith
08-26-2009, 06:25 PM
A religious justification for being a farb. Now, I have seen everything.

Sir, if you don't get that playing those common folk songs is a way of honoring our ancestors now and that even then they were in many way written to point out the pit falls and danger of vice, then please don't pontificate on what is proper use of the talent's the Lord has passed on to us.


Hey! You don't have to put "sir" in there! Don't know if you checked out my profile, but I'm only 17 and so "sir" is not necessary unless I'm being addressed by a much younger person!

I appreciate honest opinion though I couldn't disagree much more heartily than I do!

I do not try to "justify" being a "farby" reenactor. I reenact with my mom who is not a reenactor, just an escort....and she "ain't" drinkin' out of no tin cup or eatin' hard tack for a weekend! Sorry! :D

As a descendant of our own General, Robert Edward Lee, I can honor my ancestor by praying, singing period hymns (that point the way to stay out of said pitfalls and vices without singing about them,) listening to solid preaching, etc, etc. My other less renowned ancestors that I represent, were also, as far as I know, devout men who tried to live right!

To prevent furthur strife on this thread, I retire, having clearly presented my position.

The blacksmith and aspiring private,
Dave Custer

FloridaConfederate
08-26-2009, 07:09 PM
I'll place my faith firmly in the handling venomous snakes.

Chris Rideout
Tampa, Florida

goatgirl
08-26-2009, 09:03 PM
A religious justification for being a farb. Now, I have seen everything.

Dave gave no religious justification for being a farb. He just sounded like a “period preacher.” :) It is not necessary to sing songs a person disapproves of to be authentic. In the 1860’s there were drunkards and there were ministers who preached against drinking even a sip, and there were folks at every level in-between, “social drinkers,” if you please. So, you can be a “hardcore” by staggering around drunk, or you can be a “hardcore” by being a chaplain and beseeching the Generals to pour out the barrels of whisky. Now, whether you can be a Christian and do either of those things. . .is totally off topic. :grin:

The same goes for singing. You can be a “hardcore” singing “Rosin the Bow,” or you can be a “hardcore” singing “My Old Kentucky Home.” You can also sing either of the songs and be “mainstream.”

plankmaker
08-27-2009, 07:11 AM
You might want to look into Dan Rice. He had quite the follwoing back in the day.

http://www.clown-ministry.com/History/Dan-Rice.html

Mark Campbell
Piney Flats, TN

Hardtack Herring
09-04-2009, 09:15 PM
Well the 2nd SC are by far the most popular and among my favorites.

I am going to throw a few more fantastic groups out there I am sure many of you have not even heard of.

Canebrake Minstrels
Free and Excepted Minstrels of New Orleans
Camptown Shakers
Allendale Mellodians

jda3rd
09-05-2009, 11:37 PM
To my knowledge, Unreconstructed is the only group mentioned that has won an Emmy Award!

Frank Brower
Jeff Davis Artillery

harplady
09-11-2009, 02:50 PM
Are you familiar with Bobby Horton? He sings a TON of Civil War songs with nice accompaniment. I don't like some of his songs for the reasons you mentioned (a few are tacky, some have bad words), but he has about a dozen CDs of Civil War music and some of them have nice assortments of stuff.

Check out this link for some of his CDs:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss?url=search-alias%3Dpopular&field-keywords=bobby+horton

goatgirl
09-11-2009, 07:59 PM
No, Ma’am. I’m not familiar with Bobby Horton. Thank you for giving an overview of his music.

Silas
09-12-2009, 06:30 PM
Bobby Horton is to authentic sounding music as Mort Kunsler is to painting. Both are horrible. Horton's synthesized version of Dixie will put you to tears. I don't mean that in a good way.

Mint Julep
09-12-2009, 09:12 PM
I’ve heard as many different versions of “Dixie” as I have groups that played it. No, I don’t like the one about “Will the deceiver.” Not only are there different verses, there are different “Dixie” or "Dixie's Land" songs as well.

Well, best I can tell, Dan Emmett wrote the version you don't like, so you don't want to hear the real "Dixie", you want to hear a PC version that has been polished to make it more palatable to those that want to ignore the reality of the history of this nation.

Young lady, one day you are going to learn an important lesson in life: You have to take the bad with the good. Hiding from something does not make it go away.

Blockade Runner
09-14-2009, 10:47 AM
Hi Goat Girl:

I believe that the best band for the Southern Representation of WBTS songs is the 2nd SC String Band. The group was featured in the movie Gods and Generals, where they performed "Bonnie Blue Flag". To me, the attribute that differentiates them from other period bands is that when they perform they best represent the flavor and soul of the actual music of the period. When I hear them they transport me back to 1863. I have seen the band multiple times and have never attended a performance leaving disappointed. The 2nd SC String Band sing the songs with the patriotic fervor and spirit that the music evokes. Their versions of "Southern Soldier", "I am a Southern Rebel", and "Dixie" are simply electrifying. Additionally, the instrumental versions of various reels are captivating.

I have all of their CD's. If I was to recommend two CD's I would say Southern Soldier and Lightening in a Jar (Double Live CD) are the best to purchase.;)

Silas
09-14-2009, 11:40 AM
Being featured in GAG (Gods and Generals) isn't a ringing endorsement. In a movie filled with stupid scenes, the Bonnie Blue Flag scene ranks down there with some of the worst. That scene was - a lemon.

Spinster
09-14-2009, 12:30 PM
Where's the ukulele girl? She's been banished. My new politically correct avatar is certified not to offend prudish, sheltered, overly sensitive, anonymous individuals at the supposed period dinner table.

Mistah Tackett,

Scoot those puppies over so I can see better. That one on the left looks like he's up to something.

Idealized Puppies, Idealized Music, Idealized Views of the 19th century. Reality bites.

Me, I much prefer the image Mr. Szabo took of the occupants a certain swimming hole.....

Silas
09-14-2009, 01:29 PM
If I move it too far to the left, the heart and rainbow would not be sufficiently visible.

Remember to think HAPPY THOUGHTS when discussing battlefield death, pestulance, drug abuse and dismemberment during the Civil War.

Blockade Runner
09-14-2009, 02:13 PM
Being featured in GAG (Gods and Generals) isn't a ringing endorsement. In a movie filled with stupid scenes, the Bonnie Blue Flag scene ranks down there with some of the worst. That scene was - a lemon.

I would agree that Gods and Generals had many flaws, but one of them wasn't the rendition of Bonnie Blue Flag by the 2nd SC String Band. Even if the scene was a bit contrived, the musical performance was superb.:D

Ross L. Lamoreaux
09-14-2009, 03:03 PM
If I move it too far to the left, the heart and rainbow would not be sufficiently visible.

Remember to think HAPPY THOUGHTS when discussing battlefield death, pestulance, drug abuse and dismemberment during the Civil War.

Nothing say "I love you" quite like puppy dogs, hearts, and the discussion of long ago wars...

33rdaladrummer
09-14-2009, 03:22 PM
Well, best I can tell, Dan Emmett wrote the version you don't like, so you don't want to hear the real "Dixie", you want to hear a PC version that has been polished to make it more palatable to those that want to ignore the reality of the history of this nation.


There is a period version other like Dan Emmett's original minstrel version. I am sure many southerners at the time appreciated Albert Pike composing this more patriotic version and would have prefered it.

Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up, lest worse than death befall you!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Lo! all the beacon fires are lighted
Let all hearts be now united!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Chorus:
Advance the flag of Dixie!
Hurrah! Hurrah!
For Dixie's Land we take our stand,
And live or die for Dixie!
|: To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie!
2. Hear the Northern thunders mutter!
Northern flags in South winds flutter!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Send them back your fierce defiance!
Stamp upon the cursed alliance!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Chorus

3. Fear no danger! Shun no labor!
Lift up rifle, pike, and sabre!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Shoulder pressing close to shoulder,
Let the odds make each heart bolder!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Chorus

4. How the South's great heart rejoices
At your cannon's ringing voices!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
For faith betrayed and pledges broken,
Wrongs inflicted, insults spoken,
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Chorus
5. Strong as lions, swift as eagles,
Back to their kennels hunt these beagles!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Cut the unequal bond asunder!
Let them hence each other plunder!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Chorus
6. Swear upon your country's altar
Never to submit or falter!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Till the spoilers are defeated,
Till the Lord's work is completed,
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Chorus

7. Halt not till our Federation
Secures among earth's powers its station!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Then at peace, and crowned with glory,
Hear your children tell the story!
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Chorus

8. If the loved ones weep in sadness,
Victory soon shall bring them gladness.
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Exultant pride soon banish sorrow;
Smiles chase tears away tomorrow.
To arms! To arms! To arms! In Dixie!
Chorus

goatgirl
09-14-2009, 08:09 PM
Well, best I can tell, Dan Emmett wrote the version you don't like, so you don't want to hear the real "Dixie", you want to hear a PC version that has been polished to make it more palatable to those that want to ignore the reality of the history of this nation.

As 33rdladrummer has pointed out in two of his posts, not everyone in the 1860’s liked Dan Emmett’s version of Dixie. In W. G. Simms War poetry of the South, he does not even have Yankee Dan Emmett’s song in his book. He chose to print Albert Pike’s Confederate version Dixie. As a staunch loyal Southerner, I certainly feel no obligation to like all of some Yankee’s song. However, I have every right historically to sing which verses I choose if I do sing some of his song.

Blockade Runner, Thanks for sharing your take on the 2nd SC String Band.

hanktrent
09-14-2009, 09:37 PM
As 33rdladrummer has pointed out in two of his posts, not everyone in the 1860’s liked Dan Emmett’s version of Dixie. In W. G. Simms War poetry of the South, he does not even have Yankee Dan Emmett’s song in his book. He chose to print Albert Pike’s Confederate version Dixie. As a staunch loyal Southerner, I certainly feel no obligation to like all of some Yankee’s song. However, I have every right historically to sing which verses I choose if I do sing some of his song.

If one sees the songs as historical artifacts about events that happened to a different generation, or if one enjoys them for their humor or passion or drama without taking them too seriously, the problem disappears. However, if one believes that a person must avoid even listening to descriptions of actions that one finds distasteful, may I ask... do you believe that advocating the killing of U.S. soldiers is morally acceptable?

If I took Dixie so seriously that I didn't want to listen to how some fictional weaver swindled some fictional woman, I'd find it absolutely chilling to listen to a version designed to inspire real people to kill real U.S. soldiers doing their duty.

Fortunately, I don't take any of it that seriously, and I think the patriotic Dixie is just as inspiring in its own way as The Battle Hymn of the Republic, and--though many people today would disagree with me--dialect songs like "Will de weaber" and other blackface minstrel songs are just as innocently humorous as the day they were written, if one listens to them in historical context and doesn't internalize the racism. (Though I still have enough respect for others' feelings and sense of self-preservation not to listen to them on headphones on the bus, where strangers who didn't know me might overhear.) :shock:

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

Silas
09-14-2009, 10:31 PM
As a staunch loyal Southerner, I certainly feel no obligation to like all of some Yankee’s song. However, I have every right historically to sing which verses I choose if I do sing some of his song.

Wow. Such a strong statement for freedom of expression. And so very ironic.

Ross L. Lamoreaux
09-14-2009, 10:48 PM
And thus begins another version of "us vs. them".....

Spinster
09-14-2009, 11:23 PM
If I took Dixie so seriously that I didn't want to listen to how some fictional weaver swindled some fictional woman, ...........

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

Itinerant traveling weavers--now there's you a period trade most folks don't know much about. Gives a man an opportunity to go house to house, show off his muscles, work, and then move on. Fictional weaver my eye.......:rolleyes:

Gracious. And here I was still waiting for the day some feller would knock on my door, put together this rocker beater loom that's taking up space in my parlour, work all my household rags into rugs, and then put his arm around me and smile as fierce as a fourty-pounder....

Or at least try to put his arm around me......There's buckwheat cake and injun batter, makes you fat or a little fatter.......

dculgan
09-15-2009, 07:00 AM
For me there's never a question of which set of lyrics to sing. Dan Emmett wove a lot of poetry into the lyrics making this one of the most fun songs to sing in our repertoire (not that I can do the relatively wide vocal range justice). The only decision is whether to include that extra verse, I think it was on the manuscript but omitted from the published version, " dis world was made in just 6 days....". Something for everyone, biblical references, weavers, food, travel, agriculture - what's not to like? I can never get that worked up about the patriotic songs.

Dave Culgan
Camptown Shakers

hanktrent
09-15-2009, 08:52 AM
Itinerant traveling weavers--now there's you a period trade most folks don't know much about. Gives a man an opportunity to go house to house, show off his muscles, work, and then move on. Fictional weaver my eye.......:rolleyes:

Seriously, the year I met my wife, I was working at a four-harness loom weaving coverlets, and my real first name is Will (William H. Trent).

Man, I missed out on what I coulda done, if only I'd let myself be corrupted by that song... I'd be a rich man now. :twisted: LOL, never thought of the coincidence before.

Hank Trent
(who actually was born early on a frosty morning, south of the Mason-Dixon line)
hanktrent@gmail.com

Spinster
09-15-2009, 09:57 AM
I dunno Sir. That was a mighty fine looking lady you were squiring around at the Perryville Horse Auction and Races last year.

Gambled away all her inheritance yet?

goatgirl
09-15-2009, 12:30 PM
Mr. Trent,

When I play “Dixie Land” I mostly just like the verses:

I wish I was in the land of cotton, Old times there are not forgotten,
Look a-way! Look a-way! Look a-way! Dixie Land.
In Dixie Land where I was born in, Early on one frosty morning, Look a-way! Look a-way! Look a-way Dixie land.

Then I wish I was in Dixie, Hooray! Hooray!
In Dixie land I’ll take my stand To live and die in Dixie,
A-way, a-way, a-way down south in Dixie
A-way, a-way, a-way down South in Dixie

I can identify with them. When we visit friends in Ohio, I like to tell them I feel just that way, “I wish I was in Dixie.”

I don’t find anything sensible, edifying, or humorous about the “Will-the-weaver” verses. If I lived in the 1860’s I can’t see myself finding those verses any more humorous or enjoyable than I see them now. What have those verses got anything to do with Dixie’s land? I find those verses as the writer in the Rich. Dispatch found the whole song, “mere doggerel stuff.”

If I was a Southerner in 1863 and my brothers were fighting the Yankees invaders, yes, I’d be singing songs to inspire them to fight U.S. soldiers. I’d certainly tell my brother’s “To arms! To Arms! In Dixie!” Howbeit, that doesn’t mean I’d like every verse and wording in a song.

While I will sing historical a song that in general is about defending Dixie and thus fighting U.S. soldiers, there are some songs with harsh tones I do not like. There is some song about killing Yankee soldiers which says something to the effect, “I wish it was three million Yankees instead of the three hundred that I got.” That seems more like malicious murder than a war song.

Mint Julep
09-15-2009, 12:43 PM
Mr. Trent,

When I play “Dixie Land” I mostly just like the verses:

I wish I was in the land of cotton, Old times there are not forgotten,
Look a-way! Look a-way! Look a-way! Dixie Land.
In Dixie Land where I was born in, Early on one frosty morning, Look a-way! Look a-way! Look a-way Dixie land.

Then I wish I was in Dixie, Hooray! Hooray!
In Dixie land I’ll take my stand To live and die in Dixie,
A-way, a-way, a-way down south in Dixie
A-way, a-way, a-way down South in Dixie

I can identify with them. When we visit friends in Ohio, I like to tell them I feel just that way, “I wish I was in Dixie.”

I don’t find anything sensible, edifying, or humorous about the “Will-the-weaver” verses. If I lived in the 1860’s I can’t see myself finding those verses any more humorous or enjoyable than I see them now. What have those verses got anything to do with Dixie’s land? I find those verses as the writer in the Rich. Dispatch found the whole song, “mere doggerel stuff.”

If I was a Southerner in 1863 and my brothers were fighting the Yankees invaders, yes, I’d be singing songs to inspire them to fight U.S. soldiers. I’d certainly tell my brother’s “To arms! To Arms! In Dixie!” Howbeit, that doesn’t mean I’d like every verse and wording in a song.

While I will sing historical a song that in general is about defending Dixie and thus fighting U.S. soldiers, there are some songs with harsh tones I do not like. There is some song about killing Yankee soldiers which says something to the effect, “I wish it was three million Yankees instead of the three hundred that I got.” That seems more like malicious murder than a war song.

Miss,

The song was not written as a southern anthem. It was written to be performed in a minstrel show. You would probably object to a minstrel show, since the humor can be base and crude and the language is typically reflective of the racism of the period. However, the song was wildly popular, so clearly most folks were hearing it somewhere.

You are listening to the song from a modern perspective, not in the historical perspective. So, it doesn't really matter what lyrics you listen to, how it is played or who plays it. You may as well be listening to a Weird Al Yankovic parody.

Your dismissal of the original lyrics tells me you don't really like the song, you like the romantic idea the revised versions were designed to stimulate. As Herr Curt likes to talk about, you like the Mental Image you get from the thoughts of the song as a southern anthem.

I'm surprised you haven't objected to the mocking slave dialect used in the writing of the lyrics. Or didn't you notice?

plankmaker
09-15-2009, 12:46 PM
I'll never forget singing this while marching through town at an event in NC many moons ago (might of been one of the old Fort Branch ones). They saw us in blue coming and started to boo. Then we started to sing and got a thunderous cheer. Then they started listening to the words and the boos were back.

Mark Campbell
Piney Flats, TN

Away down South in the land of traitors,
Rattlesnakes and alligators,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
Where cotton's king and men are chattels,
Union boys will win the battles,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
(Chorus)
Then we'll all go down to Dixie,
Away, away,
Each Dixie boy must understand
That he must mind his Uncle Sam,
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
Away, away,
And we'll all go down to Dixie.
I wish I was in Baltimore,
I'd make Secession traitors roar,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
We'll put the traitors all to rout.
I'll bet my boots we'll whip them out,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
(Chorus)
Oh, may our Stars and Stripes still wave
Forever o'er the free and brave,
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
And let our motto ever be --
For Union and for Liberty!"
Right away, come away, right away, come away.
(Chorus)

plankmaker
09-15-2009, 02:01 PM
Oh, and how more wholesome can you get than Tennessee Ernie Ford.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TW3CYryz7w

Mark Campbell
Piney Flats, TN

goatgirl
09-15-2009, 02:11 PM
Mr. Mint Julep and all,

If every period band feels they must sing all or none of the verses to Dan Emmett’s "Dixie", then so be it. I think it is pretty clear what kind of Cd I’m looking for.

Silas
09-15-2009, 02:56 PM
There is some song about killing Yankee soldiers which says something to the effect, “I wish it was three million Yankees instead of the three hundred that I got.” That seems more like malicious murder than a war song.

Worry not for I'm a Good Ol' Rebel is post bellum.

goatgirl
09-15-2009, 03:59 PM
Worry not for I'm a Good Ol' Rebel is post bellum.

Thanks for supplying the title. I could not remember what song it was or exactly how the words went.

Talk about humor, propriety, and taking songs seriously, “The Old Rifleman” is questionable. It is humorous to some degree and a lot of truth from the Southern view, yet it seems a little harsh to make jovial light of killing even in war. I doubt Gen. Lee would like the spirit toward “those people.”

The Old Rifleman
By Frank Ticknor, of Georgia

Now bring me out my buckskin suit!
My pouch and powder, too!
We’ll see if seventy-six can shoot
As sixteen used to do.

Old Bess! we’ve kept our barrels bright!
Our trigger quick and true!
As far, if not as fine a sight,
As long ago we drew!

And pick me out a trusty flint!
A real white and blue,
Perhaps ‘twill win the other tint
Before the hunt is through!

Give boys your brass percussion caps!
Old “shut-pan” suits as well!
There’s something in the sparks: perhaps
There’s something in the smell!

We’ve seen the red-coat Briton bleed!
The red-skin Indian, too!
We’ve never thought to draw a bead
On Yankee-doodle-doo!

But, Bessie! bless your dear old heart!
Those days are mostly done;
And now we must revive the art
Of shooting on the run!

If Doodle must be meddling, why,
There’s only this to do-
Select the black spot in his eyes,
And let the daylight through!

And if he doesn’t like the way,
That Bess presents the view,
He’ll maybe change his mind, and stay
Where the good Doodles do!

We’ll teach these shot-gun boys the tricks
By which a war is won;
Especially how Seventy-six
Took Tories on the run.

flattop32355
09-15-2009, 08:47 PM
Miss, General Lee sent many of his own men out to be killed and to kill. He knew what fighting a war was about. While he did not delight in it, he knew how to do it, and did it, and had for most of his life.

These are songs of war of which we speak. Even the ones of hearth and home are about men at war thinking other, softer thoughts for a time. And sometimes their thoughts were not softer, and the same is true of some of their songs. They are, all of them, true to the men who fought on both sides, be they good, bad or somewhere in between.

It is not clean. Sometimes, it's not pretty. But it is true to the men who fought.

Pvt Schnapps
09-16-2009, 04:23 AM
Who needs a fiddle?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxzd88HZfxw

Pvt Schnapps
09-16-2009, 04:39 AM
And, come to think of it, who needs a group? Here's an authentic early war piece by a New Orleans musician: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lli2DL2oAPE

GaWildcat
09-16-2009, 06:38 AM
Miss, General Lee sent many of his own men out to be killed and to kill. He knew what fighting a war was about. While he did not delight in it, he knew how to do it, and did it, and had for most of his life.

These are songs of war of which we speak. Even the ones of hearth and home are about men at war thinking other, softer thoughts for a time. And sometimes their thoughts were not softer, and the same is true of some of their songs. They are, all of them, true to the men who fought on both sides, be they good, bad or somewhere in between.

It is not clean. Sometimes, it's not pretty. But it is true to the men who fought.

Right on the money. War is not pretty, and the men who fight it have other things on thier mind alot of the time. And soldiers, and there tastes dont really change. We make the mistake of holding Victorian society and the soldiers of that time with some sort of Marble Statue of what we think they are.. they werent. Lee perhaps, maybe Jackson, but the rest were normal human men.. example, Jeb Stuart, while maybe not completely unfaithful to his wife, was without a doubt something of a philanderer, as was of course, George Custer, Earl Van Dorn, and Judson Kilpatrick. There are diaries and letters a plenty (some in a thread on the AC) about less than "Victorian" attitudes of a delicate and intimate nature. Historically, we can not buy into the sanitized concept of Southern Chivalry and that the soldiers were all gallant Knights Errant, they were men, and subject to all the inadequacies that mark us as humans. I applaud you Ms. Hansard for your Faith and your determination to stand by your principles.. a most admirable trait these days.

goatgirl
09-16-2009, 12:55 PM
Mr. Biederman

As you said, “he did not delight in it.” During The War when one of his generals exclaimed of the Union soldiers, "I wish those people were all dead!" General Lee gently chided, "How can you say so, General? Now I wish they were all at home attending to their own business and leaving us to do the same."

And after the war, you would not hear Gen. Lee singing:

Three hundred thousand Yankees
Is stiff in Southern dust;
We got three hundred thousand
Before they conquered us;
They died of Southern fever
And Southern steel and shot;
I wish they was three million
Instead of what we got.”

Instead he was saying, "I have fought against the people of the North because I believed they were seeking to wrest from the South its dearest rights. But I have never cherished toward them bitter or vindictive feelings, and have never seen the day when I did not pray for them."

Even his own wife spoke more vehement in her speech and name-calling toward “those people” then Gen. Lee. Honestly, I think I’d probably be a bit more like Mrs. Lee. Though about the strongest thing I ever call “those people” is “Yankees.” Which, when pronounced with the contempt and scorn that only a Southern lady can put into the word, that is about as bad a thing as they need to be called. :)

Talking about those kind of songs gets a bit away from the original subject post of song styles. While I view war and killing as a very sober and serious matter, I can see why someone would write “The Old Rifleman” and I can see how some folks (not Gen. Lee) from the era would appreciate it. Songs like “The Banks of Ohio” are in a totally different camp. I cannot comprehend why anyone would enjoy listening to such foolishness.

Mr. Hughes

Don’t think I think all men of the area were fine gentleman. Even Gen. Lee, much as I admire him, practiced things I could not endorse. Though I deserve no applause, thank you for your kindness. I’d hate to think my principles made you ill toward me since I may be meeting you and/or your wife this Saturday! :)

GaWildcat
09-16-2009, 01:26 PM
Aw Shucks... I just admire courage where ever I see it.!

harplady
09-17-2009, 07:53 AM
I’ve heard as many different versions of “Dixie” as I have groups that played it. No, I don’t like the one about “Will the deceiver.” Not only are there different verses, there are different “Dixie” or "Dixie's Land" songs as well.

Ever heard the sarcastic "Officers of Dixie" version? :D

http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/usa/offdixie.htm

harplady
09-17-2009, 07:56 AM
Bobby Horton is to authentic sounding music as Mort Kunsler is to painting. Both are horrible. Horton's synthesized version of Dixie will put you to tears. I don't mean that in a good way.

Yeah, the synthesized version probably isn't the best one out there. :D Pretty, but a little......um........well, it's synthesizer, what do you expect? LOL!

But if you're looking for nice tunes and want to broaden your Civil War musical knowledge, he does have a lot of neat, fun songs.

flattop32355
09-17-2009, 06:35 PM
Even his own wife spoke more vehement in her speech and name-calling toward “those people” then Gen. Lee. Honestly, I think I’d probably be a bit more like Mrs. Lee. Though about the strongest thing I ever call “those people” is “Yankees.” Which, when pronounced with the contempt and scorn that only a Southern lady can put into the word, that is about as bad a thing as they need to be called. :)

You, as a modern-day Southron lady, would say such a thing, in such a way, to me as a modern-day "Yankee"! I find that most interesting. Most interesting, indeed.

And it was, in fact, General Lee, not Mrs. Lee, who sent those men to kill and be killed, as was seen as necessary at the time. No amount of soft, personal feelings, about which we may only speculate, can change that fact, no matter how admirable the man.

goatgirl
09-17-2009, 08:34 PM
Ever heard the sarcastic "Officers of Dixie" version?

No, Ma’am. Sadly, it is too true to be pretty. :( :| :)


You, as a modern-day Southron lady, would say such a thing, in such a way, to me as a modern-day "Yankee"! I find that most interesting. Most interesting, indeed.

It was not personal, Mr. Biederman. Some of my closest friends live in OH.