PDA

View Full Version : “Civil War” style fiddle book



goatgirl
07-21-2009, 07:56 PM
Does anyone know of a fiddle book and CD which teaches “Civil War” 1860’s old time style fiddling?

Company Fiddler
07-22-2009, 07:22 AM
Check out Wayne Erbson's Home Spun Music site.

Company Fiddler
07-22-2009, 09:46 AM
Check out Wayne Erbson's Home Spun Music site.

Correction, that is Wayne Erbsen, Nativeground Music.

goatgirl
07-22-2009, 09:19 PM
Thank you, Mr. Krugman. I’ll check that out.

Old Cremona
07-27-2009, 07:08 AM
There is plenty of good "old time" fiddle instructional material being published today, no doubt. However, you might want to consider tutors published by the people of the period themselves, to ensure authenticity. Here is the 1852 "Beckel's Easy Violin Player, Containing thorough Instruction for the VIOLIN, and a choice Selection of the most popular Waltzes, Reels, Dances, Cotillions, Polkas, Mazurkas, Marches, Gerlitzas."

These type of original method books can be found in the Library Of Congress American Memory site:

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/sm2html/sm2home.html

Just search violin method.

eric woods
08-14-2009, 10:11 AM
Nicole,

At many CW bookstores you can find Civil War music books with plenty of songs available. As far as accompanying CD's, most of the popular bands who play now are great inspiration for developing your "sound" and they will no doubt be playing many of the tunes from above mentioned books. ( 2nd South Carolina is my fav. but thats a shameless plug I as I know them all and have "jammed" with them on occasion!! ) Another good source, (I don't know how much fiddling experience you have, so let's assume square one) I learned from Homespun music and tapes, specifically "Kenny Koseck Bluegrass fiddle" It shown some basic tunes and builds you up for more advanced songs. It worked well for me. Now, I cannot read music, so I learn by ear and just figure it out, but the Homespun lessons do come with sheet music. Also, you did mention "old time fiddle" and that can make a difference in and of itself. "old time fiddlers" played with the fiddle tucked down in the bend of their elbow, and not under the chin as most do today. Sometimes presentation plays a large part also!!! When I hear a song I want to play, and wish to combine it with a CW repetoir, I google search it, and you will usually find a publish date for it. (I did this for a Christmas show I did a few years back, and was AMAZED at just how old our Christmas songs are, but at times they were called by different names way back when) Knowledge and background info on your songs will have a GREAT impact on how you "do your show" or play among your friends. (It also gives your arm a rest!!) Well, I hope this helps and good luck.

Eric Woods

( who recalls being asked at a show, where there was a classical violinist appearing as well, "whats the difference between violin and fiddle players?" My response, "a violinist knows what they're doing!!")

goatgirl
08-15-2009, 08:13 PM
Mr. Woods,



( who recalls being asked at a show, where there was a classical violinist appearing as well, "whats the difference between violin and fiddle players?" My response, "a violinist knows what they're doing!!")

That certainly rules me out of being a violinist then!

For basic learning purposes, I use Eleanor Townsend’s Townsend Old Time Fiddle Method which I really like. I also have some “CW” song books, yet just having “CW” songs does not help - I have heard my friends “Bluegrass” Dixie! It is as you mentioned the “sound” or style I am desiring to achieve.

Sadly, I cannot play by ear. Listening to a band play without any instructions, leaves me wondering, “How do they get ’Dixie’ to sound like that”? When I play “Dixie” it does not sound anything like their playing. Un-fortunately, I am strictly a “1-2-3 this is how you do it” kind of learner. Yet since it does not seem like much of that exists for 1860’s style playing, I reckon I’ll have to find some decent CW band CDs and see if I can’t make myself learn that way.

Thanks,
Nicole

Company Fiddler
08-17-2009, 09:59 AM
[QUOTE=goatgirl;127174]

For basic learning purposes, I use Eleanor Townsend’s Townsend Old Time Fiddle Method which I really like. I also have some “CW” song books, yet just having “CW” songs does not help - I have heard my friends “Bluegrass” Dixie! It is as you mentioned the “sound” or style I am desiring to achieve.

Madam,

I am not familliar with Eleanor Townsend's method book but I believe that she is the wife of the late, five time world champion Canadian fiddle Graham Townsend. It is most probable that her method book would have a "Canadian" slant to the playing style. While that is wondefull fiddling, it is not CW era style. Like wise, "Blugrass" style is not CW period correct. Bluegrass music owes it's birth to Bill Monroe durring the 1940's.

I would sugest that a method book that focuses on Southern Appilachian fiddle styles would be most appropriate for the sound you are looking for. There are many advocates of this style of playing with method books, CD's and vidios available. I earlier mentioned Wayne Erbsen and would add Brad Leftwich as possible sources.

Respectfully,

goatgirl
08-17-2009, 07:39 PM
Mr. Krugman,

You are absolutely correct that Mrs. Townsend’s book, though delightful, is not CW style. I used it to learn to play the fiddle at all.

I did look at the books you recommend and they do look interesting. I may end up purchasing some of Wayne Erbsen’s books. Thanks as well of for mentioning “Southern Appalachian fiddle styles.” I’ll keep that in mind as well. Thinking about it, the “Smoky Mountain” song tapes we have with the fiddle do sound a lot like the “CW” style.

Thank you.
Nicole