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DaveGink
08-08-2006, 10:09 PM
I thought this was an interesting photo...

http://www.shasta.com/suesgoodco/newcivilians/camp/chairs2.jpg

Pretty clear shot of a folding chair that looks remarkably like what today's "director's chairs" look like. You can even see the hinges are similar where the arms fold up. Does anyone have or know where I could see any reference photos of these types of original chairs?

flattop32355
08-09-2006, 03:09 PM
I thought this was an interesting photo...

http://www.shasta.com/suesgoodco/newcivilians/camp/chairs2.jpg

Pretty clear shot of a folding chair that looks remarkably like what today's "director's chairs" look like. You can even see the hinges are similar where the arms fold up. Does anyone have or know where I could see any reference photos of these types of original chairs?

Any details on when/where/who on the photo?

DaveGink
08-09-2006, 03:57 PM
I originally ran across the image on this site about Civil War camp equipment: http://69.10.163.110/suesgoodco/newcivilians/camp/campfurn.htm

But I just found a much better photo here:

http://www.civil-war.net/cw_images/files/images/379.jpg

It's Dr. Jonathan Letterman, Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac and Staff - Warrenton, VA, November 1862

The biggest difference immediately apparent in Dr. Letterman's chair is the way the arms curve downward. However it looks like the officer to the viewers right is sitting in one very similar to what is found today. I wonder how common these chairs were?

DaveGink
08-09-2006, 04:46 PM
Look's like one (on the left) in this Artillery Unit (officers from the 17th New York Battery - June 1863):

http://www.civil-war.net/cw_images/files/images/269.jpg

FranklinGuardsNYSM
08-10-2006, 08:09 AM
Here's a better view of the chairs in question:

http://www.myrtle-avenue.com/hires/lettermanchairs.jpg

DaveGink
08-10-2006, 08:27 AM
Here's a better view of the chairs in question:

http://www.myrtle-avenue.com/hires/lettermanchairs.jpg

That's fantastic! Thanks!!

Great detail shot!!!

Is it possible to also get a close up of the chair on the right (seated officer with forage cap in his lap)?
Thanks again!

FranklinGuardsNYSM
08-10-2006, 12:49 PM
Dave:

http://www.myrtle-avenue.com/hires/lettermanchair2.jpg

DaveGink
08-10-2006, 01:20 PM
Dave:

http://www.myrtle-avenue.com/hires/lettermanchair2.jpg

Thanks Marc!! I really appreciate you taking the time to do that. The details are great.

AZReenactor
08-10-2006, 02:05 PM
Great detailed images of the chairs. The only problem is that now these few photos will probably be used by a whole slew of people trying to justify the use of Target, Walmart, and Ikea director chairs by private soldiers and their families in military camps. <sigh>

DaveGink
08-10-2006, 06:16 PM
Great detailed images of the chairs. The only problem is that now these few photos will probably be used by a whole slew of people trying to justify the use of Target, Walmart, and Ikea director chairs by private soldiers and their families in military camps. <sigh>

I suppose that is a possibility. However IMO, interesting information should be shared even if there may be a chance some might do that. I was personally fascinated at seeing these types of chairs because I didn't know they went back that far. Plus, I have a friend with a wood shop and was thinking it might be a fun chair to replicate. I'd like to see an original.

That said, While looking for examples it seems that they are not as common as other types of folding camp chairs used during the war - and in all cases that I found were in use by Officers, staff, or VIP's. Although I did not search that many images so it would be a mistake on my part to draw any kind of definitive conclusions.

Anyway, here are a few more:

http://www.shadowlandstudios.com/images/CivilWarDirectorsChairs.jpg

bill watson
08-12-2006, 04:22 PM
If memory serves, and it may not, I believe there is a chair like this at the Stonewall Jackson house in Winchester. Part of his headquarters kit, which included a really enormous chest. In addition to the curved wood, stained and varnished finish and fine woodworking, these chairs all seem to sport upholstered fabrics of various types, not stretched canvas seats and backs. They are folding chairs, not, um, collapsing chairs. They are also top-end, quality items aimed at the financially well off, not a mass-market deal.