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DaveGink
08-01-2006, 11:44 PM
Since everyone was so helpful in answering my questions in the uniform "weathering" thread I thought I'd ask another...

What is the general opinion of the C & D Jarnagin Sack Coat around here? It looks like a pretty decent blouse at a reasonable price from what I can tell. Especially since I can see the diagonal weave to the wool (and I like that it's a lighter 10 oz). So I thought I'd ask before ordering (#800 in link below) .

http://www.jarnaginco.com/federal%20uniforms.html

Thanks!!
Dave

VaTrooper
08-01-2006, 11:52 PM
Buyer Beware. I'll PM you some better options.

Rob
08-02-2006, 12:34 AM
Go here:

http://www.cjdaley.com/saleofthemonth.htm

and scroll down to "Pennsylvania Unlined Blouse".

Ninety bucks for a Daley unlined blouse? Can't beat that with a stick.

Regular3
08-02-2006, 08:02 AM
Time was - When I first got into this hobby - That C&DJ was considered top of the line clothing and equipment. I haven't seen one of their blouses in a long time (unless the lined one I have hanging in my closet is one of theirs) so I don't know how they stack up today but as others have said, there are better options for not much more money.

HighPrvt
08-02-2006, 09:16 AM
http://www.wwandcompany.com/

Dan Wambaugh makes a really nice lined contract blouse for $125. A lot more common than the unlined Penn. coat Daley has on sale.

Honestly though, the Jarnigan blouse isn't a bad deal. Looks a bit better than the average sutler row stuff, at a competitive price. If you do strictly mainstream type events, and arn't worried about passing an authenticity inspection, I'd say go for it. I've bought a few items from Jarnigan, and their customer service is decent.

Rob
08-02-2006, 01:43 PM
The only difference with the Pennsylvania blouse, as far as I can tell, is that the seams are machine-felled, which is not going to be noticed unless someone inspects the inside of the coat. My birthday is this month, and I'm going to grab one.

I have a Jarnagin lined blouse, now retired from active service. It is much lighter than the sutler-row stuff, most of which is like wearing a Navy pea-coat.

My first blouse was a C&C ("Cheap & Crappy") special, and my shirt would always stick to me due to its being soaked with sweat... I don't believe that this has happened with the Jarnagin. (I was going to oversew the buttonholes by hand, but I never go around to it.)

jademonkey
08-02-2006, 03:12 PM
http://www.wwandcompany.com/

Dan Wambaugh makes a really nice lined contract blouse for $125. A lot more common than the unlined Penn. coat Daley has on sale.

Honestly though, the Jarnigan blouse isn't a bad deal. Looks a bit better than the average sutler row stuff, at a competitive price. If you do strictly mainstream type events, and arn't worried about passing an authenticity inspection, I'd say go for it. I've bought a few items from Jarnigan, and their customer service is decent.

I have to agree with HighPrivate - Dan Wambaugh's sack coat is fantastic for the money. His patterns, materials, construction and costumer service are excellent. A very authentic blouse for not a lot of money.

Jarnigan's lined blouse is $105, plus $8 for sewing the buttons on , plus he doesn't handsewn the buttonholes, so if you want correct buttonholes you have to sewn them yourself. Then comes the shipping and handling charges. W&W Company charges $125, buttons are on the coat, buttonholes are handsewn, shipping is included, and I know the material and pattern he uses are correct. Daley's blouse's are great, but if money is a factor I would go with Wambaugh. Good luck, Garrett

HighPrvt
08-02-2006, 05:52 PM
Dave,
I hope we've helped you out some.
Either the unlined CJ Daley coat, or the W & W lined sack would be a better deal than the Jarnigan coat.
Even their unlined $78 coat w/ buttons sewn on, and shipping charges added just doesn't stack up to these two.


What's up with charging to sew buttons on anyway ???

DaveGink
08-03-2006, 12:01 AM
Hey, thanks everyone! I'm glad I asked!!!

I just shot off an e-mail to wwandcompany. That $90 unlined Pennsy from CJ Daley is tempting too though. Money is a bit of an issue right now

Does a lining in the blouse add much heat during the summer? I had read it can actually help by soaking up the sweat and in turn cooling you off?

cosgood
08-03-2006, 01:30 AM
In reference to the PA blouse. There is another original Sack coat ( featured in Pat Browns "For Fatigue Purposes") ID'd to a Sgt. Edmund's. This blouse is completely machine sewn except the buttonholes. It is unlined with machine seam felling. Although there are not any other originals like this that I know of, does not mean that it wasnt more common. Remember out of the 100 or so surviving blouses we know of, 1 million or more blouses were produced that could have had similar features. Just food for thought.

Also as to lined blouses, It doesnt add much more to the heat index. I have worn both, and prefer the lined blouse.

VaTrooper
08-03-2006, 09:57 AM
Casey,
Does it say if Sgt. Edmund's is a PA soldier as well?

cosgood
08-03-2006, 12:12 PM
Will,

No it does not. It states 1st MVM, they are unsure of what the MVM stands for, so your guess is as good as anyones.

VaTrooper
08-03-2006, 12:38 PM
Well I know OVM is Ohio Volunteer Militia. So mabey Maine or Massachusetts? Thats my guess.

Regular3
08-03-2006, 01:32 PM
Well I know OVM is Ohio Volunteer Militia. So mabey Maine or Massachusetts? Thats my guess.
MVM = Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. Good guess.

And it makes sense to me that a blouse made in Massachusetts would be extensively machine-sewn, since that state was a center of the garment industry at the time.

VaTrooper
08-03-2006, 02:56 PM
For anyone who wants to dig a little deeper there were 5 Edmunds in MVM regiments (Massachusetts Volunteer Militia). Francis and Erastus E. of the 51st, George and John Jr of the 43rd, and William S of the 8th. I didnt find anything about the 1st, I guess I'll need to dig a little.

cosgood
08-03-2006, 05:43 PM
Will,

His first name starts with an F. I dont have the complete name, just the first initial.

VaTrooper
08-03-2006, 06:13 PM
Mabey somewhere along the line someone forgot the 5 and its Francis Edmund of the 51st?

Doug Cooper
08-03-2006, 10:19 PM
Since everyone was so helpful in answering my questions in the uniform "weathering" thread I thought I'd ask another...

What is the general opinion of the C & D Jarnagin Sack Coat around here? It looks like a pretty decent blouse at a reasonable price from what I can tell. Especially since I can see the diagonal weave to the wool (and I like that it's a lighter 10 oz). So I thought I'd ask before ordering (#800 in link below) .

http://www.jarnaginco.com/federal%20uniforms.html

Thanks!!
Dave

There is nothing, repeat nothing correct about the sack coat in question...except they were blue and made of wool. Its not supposed to be, because the maker has chosen cheap versus correct. Pattern, materials and construction are simply wrong. It ought to be a clue when the maker offers to leave the buttonholes open so the buyer can handsew them.

Jarnagin was never authentic in regards to uniforms, and that is OK, but you can do better.

Examine any original, read "For Fatigue Purposes Only" by Pat Brown and check out any coat made by Chris Daley, Dan Wambaugh, Pat Brown, Nick Sekela, Jim Wedeward, Joe Blunt and Charlie Childs. I think Scott Hanes makes them as well. They do not compromise...nor ask the buyer to. Nor should we as hobbyists accept anything less...especially at the fantastic prices offered this year on this most basic of federal garments.

Spend a few more dollars and get a garment that you will be proud to own...and that will last 4 times longer.

Doug Cooper
08-03-2006, 10:25 PM
Hey, thanks everyone! I'm glad I asked!!!

I just shot off an e-mail to wwandcompany. That $90 unlined Pennsy from CJ Daley is tempting too though. Money is a bit of an issue right now

Does a lining in the blouse add much heat during the summer? I had read it can actually help by soaking up the sweat and in turn cooling you off?

Good question Dave. 2/3 of all sack coats were lined, 1/3 unlined. As Casey says, I have noted little difference in heat either way.

NJ Sekela
08-04-2006, 03:28 AM
Sir:

Here are some basic points to consider on the following items. This is as much a clinical analysis of "points to look for and ask these specific makers.

The Jarnagin:

1). The sleeves do not hang properly and actually kick away from the body.
2). The rear seam of the sleeve has an edgestitch along the seam. (I have never sean an original like this.
3). The button on the collar is off center. ONE DOES see that on original pieces, but I would ask Jarnagin for documentation to make sure that it is not a pattern flaw. (It would be REALLY COOL) if he copied the original.
4). The cuff is lacking the second row of topstitching, which holds down the facing. (One sometimes sees this done by hand, even on machine made pieces). Jarnagin's doesn't appear to have any stitching.
5). The facing on the coat is wide at both top and bottom. Again, he may have seen some coat that I haven't, but ASK THEM.

CJ. Daley's Pennsylvania Blouse

The pictures reveal nothing about the garment, except that he is wearing one. You really can't tell detail, or compare to his standard blouse. The one thing that is apparent, is that it is a 3 button blouse, which is extremely rare, if not the only known example. While it is kind of cool, it is one notch above the knit blouse is rarity, (which, I might add, Mr. Cooper has been critical of)

I believe that Charlie Childs made either a version of this blouse in that his had 4 buttons. The key is that the original had seam allowances that were turned with the raw edges in, and machine top stitched. Childs, just folded the seam and ran a 1/4" topstitch along the seams. It is easier to do, and only Dave Jurgella questioned it.

If this is indeed the same blouse, (it is an unlined blouse) then it is unique in that manner as well. Most original unined blouses have hand turned seam allowances. It is definitely neat, and a labor saving feature.

(last paragraph deleted- Provost)

WW and company

Perhaps one of the most friendly and sincere makers out there. (rest of paragraph deleted - Provost)

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* (line inserted - Provost)

There are "maker" or "makers" (none of the above) that actually hide behind the so called "mass produced" look of the originals. While it sounds plausible, there are in fact NO FACTORY PRODUCED GARMENTS from the 19th, 20th, or 21st century that look that bad. IN point of fact, it doesn't reflect mass production, but rather someone who doesn't know how to sew. The garments did in some instances have a few crooked lines of stitching, they did NOT however, look like homemade costumes. There is a basic skill level in the originals, and that quasi hard-kewl myth needs to be popped, because what that has translated into does not in any way resemble 19th century factory work.

Basic points to check

1). Ask all three makers for the chest size of the original, (actual measured sample), length at center back, and the cuff opening (sleeve opening). This way you can see that your reproduction is proportionally correct to your actual size. MANY reproductions have almost a "bell bottom cuff".
2). If you get those measurements from those people, and compare it to the reproduction, and by basic calculation, you will know that your coat is proportionally correct.
3). Workmanship-as stated, meandering seams are seen on originals, BUT thick lumpy seam allowances ARE NOT! Large seam allowances are not seen on men's garments from the period, except when they are intended to be altered. (Women's garments from the period tend to have the "outlet" for alteration of size and fit). The mass produced garments of the period have minimal seam allowance.

Pat Brown's book is a good basic guide to sack coats, as it compiles a lot of other work into one place. There are some patternmaking mistakes in the book which I pointed out to Mr. Brown, and he stated that it would be corrected in future editions. Overall, it is a much better option than loose copies of several articles on the web and in magazines.

I am,

NJ Sekela,

HighPrvt
08-04-2006, 05:08 AM
To be fair to Mr. Daley's coat, it does appear in the photo to have a fourth buttonhole, and what looks to be some thread where a fourth button was.
I'm guessing he was going for that " lost a button" look?!?!

theknapsack
08-04-2006, 10:21 AM
Nick,
Just a question - have you ever seen the fatigue blouse they have at the Chicago Historical Society? I've never seen a reproduction made as badly as that original. Oh - are you sending me those spec sheets? I have an appointment with the Geneva Historical Society next week.
Dave,
I would recommend Nick Sekela's blouses (which you can get on the online store at http://www.ejtsutler.com or Nick himself), or if you want to spend a little more, you can get a really nice John Wedeward blouse (http://www2.inxpress.net/jwedeward/). I've heard some criticism of Weed's blouses but they are documented after a TON of originals he has viewed (and a few that he owns). The repros I've seen are almost spot on with originals I have seen, and they compare excellently with the originals on his site (I'm sure Nick will bring up something wrong with it, but those two are your best bet). Also, if you search around for a while, there's a lot of guys that make great repros, just not as a business. My advice to you is to look at a ton of originals first, then make your decision.

NJ Sekela
08-05-2006, 04:01 AM
Riley:

In truth, while I appreciate the endorsement, I wasn't trying to promote myself here. From the day that I started this hobby, "word of mouth" has been the driving force in what people buy, and over 30 years later, it remains virtually the same, despite a tremedous increase in the level of knowledge. Nowadays, anyone with a kenmore sewing machine is now a tailor or patternmaker, often endorsing themselves without a clue as to the skill level required in that trade. You can't learn the trade in one weekend seminar. Authenticity in the hobby is still stuck in that political endorsement mode, and in order to get it back onto dry pavement, one has to define not only what skills are involved but also a logical thought process behind making a reproduction.

In terms of the comparison, I was trying to be impartial. My point was that the person requesting not be given a vague answer, but rather the tools to investigate on his own. I don't think that ALL 3 vendors mentioned would come out with 100%, BUT it should become clear who offers the best garment at that particular price. I also totally disagree with the traditional approach of NOT including low end garments in any comparison. There was an analysis of cavalry equipment a while back, and the reviewer lamb basted a top maker and then, shockingly, refused to mention the lowest makers, because, as he said, they are so bad that you can't comment on them. The end result was that the top maker, who produced custom hardware got slammed and the lowest makers walked away without a scratch and are conducting business as usual, when in fact their items should be pulled from the marketplace. You need to establish a basic criteria, and then compare all items. Ideally, original items should be examined and then compared to Charlie Childs, Jarnagin or Quartermaster Shop Chris Daley, Dan Wambaugh and so on. You can use any criteria to do this, from measurement to photographs of originals and so on. The other way is to ask the vendor to provide the documentation, and see how close they came to where they said that they were going. Quartermaster shop and C&C sutlery SHOULD BE just as accountable for what they sell as Charlie Childs, or conversely, all three should be held to a standard. If they are selling the same garment that Childs makes for $60 then, clearly, they have much higher skills then Childs. If, however, it bears no resemblance to an original or they can't provide documention, why is it being offered for sale to the reenacting public?

Frankly it is irrelevant who made the garment at this point, but the Robert Bomar frock coat project to me is as much an indication of how little people check the items they are buying, once a maker gets a reputation as the "go to guy". At the time it was advertised, I didn't examine the reproduction, and I ACCEPTED at face value the endorsements being offered. The point that relates to this thread is that there were people who endorsed that coat praised it close the second coming of Jesus.

To add to the points, I would state:
1). Only Jarnagin has clear detailed pictures of his items. (These are points in Jarnagin's favor)
2). None of the three makers has any basis as to how they arrived to the reproduction they are offering. You really need to ask them, not other people for documentation or whatever they did to get to their end product.
3). Daley and Wambaugh state that their reproductions are based on a particular original (These are points in their favor) They need to put the originals next to the reproductions they are offering. It appears Dan Wambaugh has added a credit to the Don Troiani collection, which I don't believe was there yesterday. Since Mr. Troiani required compensation for use of his name, I am very surprised that it was not put on his website until now. I personally had to provide multiple free examples of reproduction items. I am surprised that Mr. Wambaugh would provide a several free sack coats to Don Troiani, and not credit his collection until now.

Regarding Wedeward's reproduction coat, I cannot state that I have seen the coat that he reproduces, so it would be impossible for me to say if it is a good reproduction or not, and cannot do the same side by side analysis that exists with the Bomar frock coat. To TRULY make a copy of an item is extremely skilled. Not to belabor the point, but I have seen Charlie Childs' work, and I know that he can do pieces that are truly tailored pieces. In keeping with that logic, if he can make a very high quality piece, then he can very easily duplicate something that had very low quality workmanship. The true princes of that skill level were in leather items; were Chris Schreiber and Mark Sipson. Mark Sipson even copied repairs into his reproductions.

I have never seen a super-high quality tailor piece from Wedeward, again, without having seen the original he has copied, I cannot tell if that is truly a copy of a very sloppily made coat, or the extreme limit of his sewing skills. One would have to contact Wedeward to ask if he could produce a very well made blouse or any other item that is truly tailored.

This point is much clearer with Wambaugh's pieces, in that there is a variety of items he produces. While one might be able to argue the point with the Wedeward piece that he copied a particular original that reflected very poor sewing skills. The big red flag that one sees with Wambaugh's work is that ALL the items made reflect the so called "mass produced" look. I have a hard time believing that a Richmond Depot jacket looks like it came from the same sewing establishment as a late war JT Martin blouse. Again, I may be wrong, but I find it very hard to believe.

As stated, at this point in the hobby, just about anyone who can run a sewing machine is in businesses. When one starts to define exactly WHAT goes into a reproduction, it is a lot more difficult than people think. It is not JUST workmanship. You have to translate the proportions of the original garment into a reenctor body, (which tends to be larger than the average man of the 19th century). The federal army, did, by the by, and make larger size garments on a large AND individual basis. Their tariff of sizing was based on averages.

If money is a big consideration then there isn't much room for discussion. If you want to get value for your purchase, then you are going to have to send three E-mails out asking each maker some basic questions. One never knows, the information on someone's website may be outdated. I disagree with automatically giving someone an "F" and others get a free lunch.

It should become apparent whose is the best. You might even want to post the replies. Let all three of them earn their pay.

Ultimately, DON'T rush into it. Shop around. Ask questions. Ask vendors, and follow up on replies, and make as educated a purchase as you can.

I am, &c,

NJ Sekela

RJSamp
08-05-2006, 09:38 AM
Examine any original, read "For Fatigue Purposes Only" by Pat Brown and check out any coat made by Chris Daley, Dan Wambaugh, Pat Brown, Nick Sekela, Jim Wedeward, Joe Blunt and Charlie Childs. .

I'm sure John Wedeward appreciates the plug!

theknapsack
08-07-2006, 12:18 AM
Nick,
I know you are not endorsing your goods. I am.

Rob
08-07-2006, 02:06 PM
FYI:

Regarding the sale on Chris Daley's site, be advised that


Are any of these items in stock? No. We are treating all of these items as custom orders and do not have inventory built up on these items. Delivery time will be between 2-4 months, but if you have specific delivery requirements you should ask before you order.


Addenda: Chris says that the turnaround time on these has been a couple of weeks, so don't be turned off from ordering one.

NJ Sekela
08-07-2006, 07:31 PM
Sir:

Delivery time is nice, but totally irrelevant to the authenticity of the product.

I am,

NJ Sekela.
Manf'r.
N.Jers'y.

http://www.njsekela.com

shoulderedarms1861
08-07-2006, 08:46 PM
Mr. Sekela,

I own two of your garments myself and although I love them both and find them to be very close to the originals I have seen I must say I was a bit surprised with some of the workmanship.

My Federal sack sleeve lining ripped almost completely out after only wearing it twice, Then on my enlisted dress coat I was a bit set back to see loose stiching, gaps in the material on the inside of the coat and hanging thread througout the inside chest and sleeve portion of the coat. (Which I took upon my self to secure before problems developed)

I assume this was the work of your hired hands but was a bit surprised it was passed through your eyes on the way to skillet licker.

And yes, both garments were new.

I would not trade either coat but must say I also own a Wambaugh RdII and trousers and feel his work stacks up with the best of them.

My Matt Caldwell sack is also another example of excellent workmanship but I must admit his material is not as soft and comfy as yours. : )

Just my 2 cents.

YOS
R.C.Tarbox
6th NHVI
5th Va Co.D

John Legg
08-07-2006, 10:49 PM
I would deff. go with a wambaugh blouse! seriously a federal contract blouse is 125.00

if you want a SA blouse its more! like 225.00 but still

wwandcompany.com

John

VaTrooper
08-07-2006, 11:42 PM
Ill second that John. Dans the best vendor I've had the pleasure to do business with.

chase196126
08-08-2006, 12:48 AM
[QUOTE=NJ Sekela]Sir:

"Delivery time is nice, but totally irrelevant to the authenticity of the product."

I totally agree with this, but Mr. Daley has also been having some problems with delivery times. One of the guys in our unit ordered a Bomar Frock coat, and after almost 4 months with no word, he contacted Mr. Daley and was told his coat had been lost in the mail. I have heard several stories like this, which make me a bit wary. Other than that, on all the occasions I have had to talk to Mr. Daley it has been a pleasure!

I canít speak directly for the quality of the Wambaugh blouse, but he is one of the best sutler I have ever had the pleasure of dealing with! I would certainly recommend him in this area.

As for the Wedeward blouses I have been able to examine (2), both had extremely large seam allowances (over 3/4 inches if Iím not mistaken) which caused the facings to appear overly padded. On his button holes he used a blanket stitch with doubled thread (not sure if the doubled thread is inaccurate or not..) instead of a proper button hole stitch. Also, both coats had the annoying issue of having their collars pop up on one side or the other, or stand straight up instead of folding down neatly. In both of these coats he also used bright brown dyed thread instead of proper Logwood dyed, which makes the coats look a little odd.. (what I mean by this is the color of his thread does not match the color of faded Logwood in any way)

I own a Pat Brown SA sack coat and i am very pleased with it! Sadly Pat is out of town and has been unreachable for some time now. I also own one of Mr. Sekelaís Dress coats, which I love dearly! My only regret is that I bought it in too large a size! (oh well, it gives me some growing room!)

Chase Pinkham

NJ Sekela
08-08-2006, 02:52 AM
Mr. Tarbox:

With any situation like that you ABSOLUTELY need to contact me right away, as this is the first time I am reading this. I can't imagine how a sleeve lining could rip out, but I would have to see it. I have never heard of that happening, as it is like the seats of a car ripping out. Something like that doesn't JUST happen and I have to see that. The only way that it could possibly be is that someone sent you a size that was way too small, or you need a much bigger bicep than our standard blouse.

I don't know why you waited until now to say something, but anyone is free to contact me regarding my products. As I have a blackberry, I GET RIGHT back to people, usually within 10 minutes or the latest within the hour. If you notified "skilletlicker" about this it never got back to me. Something like this absolutely has to be brought to my attention, as they are not cheaply made, and I take immense pride in what I do, and is designed to be the best out there. We are the only company in this business using Gerber Pattern Drafting system which is accurate to .001 of an inch.

(first portion of paragraph deleted - Provost) I am setting up regional representatives [] both for quality assurance and to get accurate measuring. This will be better than getting measured by the local tailor.

As for the Wambaugh stuff, it is great to hear that people love him personally, but I still question whether his products are like the original. Again, the construction of his items look the same. It is what caught my eye.

As for the Wedeward pieces, you do see blanket stitches on original garments in lieu of buttonholes. His basic construction has always been a mystery to me. Rather than trim the seam allowances on the center front, he moves the buttonholes inward. I have never seen any garment made that way. With military contract pieces, the fabric was precious, so in a 4 panel blouse, with 3/4" seams you are wasting 4 (CF, CB and SS) inches of material in seam allowance, which you could easily get a collar out of. Essentially, they didn't trim seam allowances; they sewed accurately.

Regarding the Bomar, I am surprised that he is still making them. There has been intense focus on that particular item itself rather than delivery time, and there is a great disparity between that garment and the original. There is a 1200 reply thread on another forum regarding his delivery time and other hijinks. (sentence deleted - Provost) My comments here are limited to the technical perspective of all the garments involved.

Interesting stuff.

I am, &c,

NJ Sekela,
Manf'r.
N. Jers'y.

http://www.njsekela.com

DaveGink
08-08-2006, 03:54 PM
What a lot of fantastic information in this thread!!! Great for future reference.

Just to follow up, I ended up ordering the Chris Daley Pennsy blouse for $90.00. I was all set to go with the Dan Wambaugh one but since I'm a fairly big guy (50 chest) the price would have been $185 (instead of the $125.00). Money is a bit of an issue right now and $90 sounded pretty nice for that Daley Coat.

Thanks again to all!!
Dave

ewtaylor
08-08-2006, 07:52 PM
What a lot of fantastic information in this thread!!! Great for future reference.

Just to follow up, I ended up ordering the Chris Daley Pennsy blouse for $90.00. I was all set to go with the Dan Wambaugh one but since I'm a fairly big guy (50 chest) the price would have been $185 (instead of the $125.00). Money is a bit of an issue right now and $90 sounded pretty nice for that Daley Coat.

Thanks again to all!!
Dave
It is a good price, however you probably won't see it until the fall of the year. He usually takes about 3 months to make and deliver. But you will like the coat.
ew taylor

Ken
08-08-2006, 08:04 PM
I think this has been a excellent discussion and the advice given has been very helpful. I also want to say that I have a great deal of respect for the all the manufacturers mentioned in this thread. The hobby is lucky to have them. I'd also like to put a plug in for Mr. Sekela.I purchased a lot of uniform items from Joe Hoffman over the years. The vast majority of those items were made by Mr. Sekela. They included vests, trousers, enlisted frocks (Union and Confederate), Officers frocks, jackets, etc. I can honestly say that every one of those garments fits like a glove and were beautifully tailored with the correct 19th century features required to look right for the time period we portray. You can really appreciate the professional tailoring here. I'm also a stickler for the small details. I own a fair number of original items so I can be pretty picky. I've never been disappointed!

DaveGink
08-08-2006, 08:41 PM
It is a good price, however you probably won't see it until the fall of the year. He usually takes about 3 months to make and deliver. But you will like the coat.
ew taylor

Actually, it looks like I got extremely lucky ... he just wrote me and said he already had that size cut and should be able to stitch and ship within a week and a half. :)

I'll report back when it comes in.

Cheers

NJ Sekela
08-09-2006, 05:40 AM
Sir:

Although it is a close contest in that range, and although word of mouth is still the determining factor, of those three you probably made the best choice. Again, the quality level of all three is pretty close. The question that first crossed my mind was who is actually third place. The only question with the Daley blouse is the fact that he did use a custom made, highly twilled fabric that was very expensive. If he is using that fabric, then he is paying himself $10 per coat. More than likely he has found a substitute fabric.

Part Deux to this would be to get the three garments together side by side and compare them. A database should be started with at least pictures and measurements of each reproduction coat. With all of the information out there, the hobby has to go beyond "who makes the best?" and then head directly for the check out line. The Bomar was as much an eye opener as it was for anyone else, as I no longer believe the endorsements for anything. People plunk down good money, expecting to see Star Wars part 3, and instead wind up seeing Plan 9 from Outerspace. NOBODY, in my experiece, has truly captured the so called "mass produced" aesthetic of original items. NOBODY.

The review that exists of the Bomar should have been done by the Watchdog or some similiar publication. There were attempts, in the Company Wag for example, but they are long out of date. It should be the work of a put-down, put truly a definition and set of parameters that can be used in making a determination. At that point, in the people wouldn't need to ask, as they would have the tools to decide for themselves.

Some of the things being offered shouldn't even be for sale, let alone recommended. It doesn't happen overnight, and from what feedback I get, there is a tremendous thirst for more information.

Taking the industrial manufacturing perspective, what currently is reflected is more of a rough prototype than the true development that goes into make a good reproduction. Chris Schreiber had a box of unfinished pieces that were not coming out right. He also had "seconds". ALL of the vendors listed have consistently rushed into production with items that need substantial revision. Ultimately, the customer pays for that product being "rushed out the door".

There are a group of people who MAY HAVE, or WILL SOON see what it is I am talking about. The answers to "who makes the best" should start to fade away.

I am, &c,

NJ Sekela,
Manf'r.
N. Jers'y.

http://www.njsekela.com
http://www.ejtsutler.com
http://www.carterandjasper.com

Provost
08-19-2006, 09:15 AM
It seems to me that this thread has lived out it's useful life and then some.