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bgent
02-26-2009, 07:29 PM
ran across this article as told to a reporter of the NY tribune
by Surgeon Barnes of the NY 28Vol.

To attend to the wounded during the Battle of Bull Run Surgeon Barnes was ordered, In an unusual move to the rear of the attacking column . There he found a suitable place under a tree in a ravine As the men were brought before him he placed his green sash on a tree limb to signify that this place was under the charge of a surgeon.

bgent
02-26-2009, 11:00 PM
I wonder if this was common practice? Or just a spur of the moment

"Doc" Nelson
02-26-2009, 11:33 PM
Given the events unfolding during the heat of battle, anything is possible. Pretty ingenious though, might I add :mrgreen: .

I believe I read an account of the 32nd Mass Infantry's Surgeon, Z. Boylston Adams, doing that on a rock outcrop of which he placed his field depot behind on the field at Gettysburg. I have to look for the source though, so don't quote me on that ;) .

Micah Trent
03-04-2009, 03:18 PM
Here's an interesting link where a Surgeon in the 118th PA Vols. wore his sash similar to that of the "Officer of the Day".

http://books.google.com/books?id=pxlCAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA97&lpg=PA97&dq=sugreon+using+his+sash&source=bl&ots=lkEm61_SCK&sig=Xp60-rs2NAeirXYNkfGowrHiCB4&hl=en&ei=PNCuSdoMj9-2B4X8gYkG&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=1&ct=result

bgent
03-16-2009, 01:03 PM
heard tell (3hand) that a sash was also used to help remove a wounded officer from the field was it standard practice or just a logical idea

NoahBriggs
03-16-2009, 03:05 PM
[I]heard tell (3hand) that a sash was also used to help remove a wounded officer from the field[.] [W]as it standard practice[,] or just a logical idea[?]

I have never heard of this at all, let alone as "standard practice". Where did you hear about this? How would it be done? As I understand it, an officer's/NCO's sash was nothing more than a badge of rank, like the shoulder straps and the sword. It sounds like someone is making things up to make it seem like there was other symbology or "practical" use for ordinary items.

retter
03-16-2009, 03:35 PM
Sashes were said to be used in the 18th century military, to help remove wounded officers from the battlefield. In the 1700's sashes were longer than what they used in the mid 1800's. I have several accounts where Gen Braddock and several of his officers were carried from the field on their sashes. I believe the practice started in the British army early in the 1700's. They would be laid on the ground in a serpentine pattern, the wounded officer placed on top and then several men would grab a loop or the ends and carry him off. They were not intended for long term hauling, just an expedient to get them out of the area or to a wagon.

bgent
03-16-2009, 11:33 PM
Me i firmly believe if u gave 10 people an item they would find 10 different uses for it other then for what it was intedned to be used for and that should hold true since the dawn of time till its end
guess it whats seperate us from the apes, as they say

Pvt Schnapps
03-17-2009, 08:34 AM
Here's an interesting link where a Surgeon in the 118th PA Vols. wore his sash similar to that of the "Officer of the Day".

http://books.google.com/books?id=pxlCAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA97&lpg=PA97&dq=sugreon+using+his+sash&source=bl&ots=lkEm61_SCK&sig=Xp60-rs2NAeirXYNkfGowrHiCB4&hl=en&ei=PNCuSdoMj9-2B4X8gYkG&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=1&ct=result

A surgeon in the 11th Corps (I forget his name -- the letters were in "Germans in the Civil War -- the Letters They Wrote Home") wrote of wearing the sash that way on the battlefield so the enemy could see he was a doctor and, hopefully, wouldn't shoot him. That right there would make me want to buy one :)

bgent
03-17-2009, 09:35 AM
good ole American inginutity

bgent
03-17-2009, 09:39 AM
good ole American inginutity then again in some conflits the eminy would use that red cross on the helmet as a target seems if u cant treat your wounded you would win the war. pick off the comander then the medic the rest is history


Ah when mechinism entered, chilvery exited

Pete K
03-17-2009, 12:16 PM
I beleive I once saw that Braddock's Sash was in the Mt. Vernon Collection. Washington led the men after the deaths of so many officers, it makes sense he would keep something from his "abrupt lesson" in forest warfare.

Micah Trent
03-17-2009, 10:40 PM
A surgeon in the 11th Corps (I forget his name -- the letters were in "Germans in the Civil War -- the Letters They Wrote Home") wrote of wearing the sash that way on the battlefield so the enemy could see he was a doctor and, hopefully, wouldn't shoot him. That right there would make me want to buy one :)

By chance that it would possibly lower the odds of you getting shot...yep....I'd buy one as well.:D

Pvt Schnapps
03-18-2009, 10:25 PM
By chance that it would possibly lower the odds of you getting shot...yep....I'd buy one as well.:D

His name, BTW, was Carl Uterhard, of the 119th NY. He writes on June 3, 1863, "Before I forget, I want to write you a few words of reassurance about how the doctors are positioned in battles. The ones who are ordered to stay with their regiment follow along behind the soldiers at a reasonable distance of 400-800 paces. This doesn't guarantee absolute safety, of course, but the guns, cannonballs, and shrapnel don't fly as close as they did to me at the beginning, inexperienced as I was, when I took part in my first battle. In addition, doctors wear a green silk sash over their shoulders. In the last battle, mine was in my suitcase, but that won't happen again because now I wear it almost day and night, since I never think it is safe here even for a moment...."

Jas. Cox
03-19-2009, 11:08 AM
"... doctors wear a green silk sash over their shoulders...."


When he says they were it over their shoulders, I wonder how he means that. Like an untied scarf around one's neck? I'm just trying to picture this in my mind and in a way where the **** thing wouldn't be getting snagged on everything, falling off ... just generally in the way.

I do some pre 1840's things as well, and I know from experience that things like wearing a knit hat in the woods is impractical as every limb wants to rip it from one's head.

hanktrent
03-19-2009, 11:40 AM
When he says they were it over their shoulders, I wonder how he means that.

Dunno, but first thing that occurred to me was like an officer of the day.

Was the quote translated from German by a modern English-speaker maybe? It just kinda has that ring to it. If so, it's also slightly possible there's some confusion in the translation, but "over their shoulders" seems pretty straightforward, so I'm voting for officer-of-the-day style.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

Pvt Schnapps
03-19-2009, 11:44 AM
Dunno, but first thing that occurred to me was like an officer of the day.

Was the quote translated from German by a modern English-speaker maybe? It just kinda has that ring to it. If so, it's also slightly possible there's some confusion in the translation, but "over their shoulders" seems pretty straightforward, so I'm voting for officer-of-the-day style.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@voyager.net

Yes, the book was originally published in Germany in 2002, the American translation in 2006. My vote goes for OOD style, too.

Jas. Cox
03-19-2009, 04:03 PM
My vote goes for OOD style, too.


Makes sense. Thanks.