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Jari
07-23-2006, 08:11 AM
Went to Cedar Creek for the 145th Manassas/Bull Run yesterday returning late last night as I have a band commitment today. It was pretty humid but not quite as hot as the previous two weeks. The US Regulars did manage to form a Square this time! It was quite exciting to be in the middle as the CSA cavalry came charging down on us!

I saw many heat casualties and few riders, including an officer from the NR, getting thrown from horses. Speaking of which, we witnessed a CSA Cav guy really beating the stuffing out of his horse during the morning run through. The horse was not getting into line and this guy was just whipping the horse pretty hard on the side of the face. I didn't think that was pretty acceptable behavior or maybe I don't know enough about horses, 'cept to keep off them...

Anyhow, there were many buglers there and some field musics at the event but no brass bands. From my view I did not think there was a real over-whelming crowd. It did rain a little during the afternoon and maybe kept crowds away. The sutler row was pretty empty following the battle which lasted from about 4-6:15 PM. It was great to hear bugles on the field during the battle! I wish there had been some brass bands there as this would be the prefect place for them! The Federal City Brass was going to attend but there was a lack of interest from the organizers so we took a performace today in Severna Park MD.

Great to see buglers Greg Sweney Doug Grun, Joe Whitney the 2nd SC String Band, Dirty Billy, Dell's, Chris Daley, Bob Szabo , Bob Sullivan, Speedy, and many others including a few pals from Gods and Generals. I also got a chance to talk with our favorite photographer Julio while walking back (a long trek) from the sutlers. As usual the best time had was hanging with pards in my home unit (Co. D, 3rd US) and walking sulterís row and seeing familiar faces!

Jari Villanueva

Loyal Virginian
07-23-2006, 05:44 PM
Lots of bugling on both sides of the battle and throughout the camps. And, it seems to me, that there is a noticeable improvement in the quality of bugling and in its proper use on the field and in the camps (though see note on what seems to me the improper use of Church Call).

I would suggest that this is in part due to the Don Hubbard Field Music School, as I saw several fellow alums doing great work this weekend.

By the way, if you don't know who Jari is, he is the guy who goes on to the field carrying at least two bugles. That new copper bugle looked great.

26thSC
07-23-2006, 07:36 PM
"Speaking of which, we witnessed a CSA Cav guy really beating the stuffing out of his horse during the morning run through."

Lovely. And no one did anything about it? Even more charming. If he'll go that far in public, what is happening to that animal when no one is looking? Virginia has strong animal cruelty laws. Don't stand by and let an animal be abused.

That aside, I thoroughly enjoyed today's action on the battlefield, as did my guests.

Regards,

Leone Bollinger
Frederick, MD

frankstevanus
07-23-2006, 07:54 PM
Sad to hear of "horse abuse" uot in the field. I have seen it before, however. In fact, I have been tempted to share my frustration with my horse a time or two when she gets so out of control. At some of the larger, more mainstream events, like the one mentioned in this thread, so much stuff considered "strange" to a horse at one time can truely be "sensory overload" for the poor old thing.
That is why I learned long ago to ride my horse long and hard before an actual battle. That way you are more confident on your ride. And the horse is too tuckered out to cause so much trouble. I wish I knew who it was who had the problems. I understand how they feel (believe me, I do!) but there is a better, more fun way of enjoying the event than slapping the horse silly (for both of you!).
Be careful out there.

VaTrooper
07-24-2006, 12:56 AM
Well slaping the horse in the face makes no sense but smacking his rump to push him into line is acceptable, IMHO. As far as the event goes I thought it was pretty good. Dont know what happened too the 420 registered Cav, Id say 200 showed up. The weather was pretty good compared to the last couple weeks. Between the rain and the smoke Saturdays battle looked pretty cool. I was a little disapointed about the officers not letting us use our rifles while charging the square. How long is a pistol sposed to last? And the sabre just looked dumb, I felt like an indian running around a wagon train. The Fed Cav looked very good. But as usual I had some "brothers in arms" that I tasted some vomit that came up after seeing. One "dismounted" trooper had 4 pistols with 4 extra cylinders and a henry rifle, PATHETIC! 40 rounds and a Mississippi rifle looked a whole lot better. Hope everyone else had a good time for the most part too.

redpatch
07-24-2006, 06:12 AM
We heard a cavalry participant was dismounted and landed on his head. I saw someone fall on Saturday while a prisoner behind the Confederate line watching the action. Saw the ambulance too. Any word as to whether we received accurate news about the incident and whether the gentleman is okay?

Rob Galbraith

MStuart
07-24-2006, 10:36 AM
One "dismounted" trooper had 4 pistols with 4 extra cylinders and a henry rifle

Kinda makes me happy I wasn't there.

Mark

VaTrooper
07-24-2006, 11:07 AM
Rob,
He fell off onto his sholder. Not sure if anything broke.

bulletsponge
07-24-2006, 11:14 AM
On Saturday we fired a volley and then waited for about 45 minutes before resuming action. In the meantime we had plenty of time to watch as civilians walked around down the hill in front of our LOADED guns. I guess that and the spectators sitting in beach chairs behind the battery just added to the general Laissez-faire environment that was supposedly prevalent that early in the war. All that aside, the opening volley and closing salute were really an amazing experience - I've never seen that many guns firing together, and the smoke would completely obscure everything in front of us.

On Sunday I brought along my bugle, and actually got to play a couple of calls while we waited for the order to commence firing. There was not much to see from our vantage point, as most of the action took place on the other side of a small ridge that runs between the Heater house and the main spectator area.

After cleaning up and loading the gun back onto its trailer, a (very) small group of us headed out to the real Manassas battle ground. It was amazing to see again at what close quarters the battle around Henry Hill was fought - I doubt you could reenact that and still maintain modern safety requirements...

redpatch
07-24-2006, 11:51 AM
Rob,
He fell off onto his sholder. Not sure if anything broke.

Well, that's better than what we heard. Hope he is okay.

Hondo
07-24-2006, 05:30 PM
Rob,

I know one of the cav who fell from his horse. He was taken to Winchester and treated. He was told it was a neck sprain. He was doing as well as could be expected afterwards. Time will tell if it is anything more serious.

VaTrooper
07-24-2006, 05:41 PM
Wasnt there a Federal guy hit by a car late Friday by the Union Artillery camp?

indguard
07-24-2006, 06:26 PM
Anyone know the numbrs of participants?

Kimmel
07-24-2006, 07:53 PM
I'm disapointed I didn't get to go and bugle! I heard it was a good event though

3rdUSRedleg
07-25-2006, 12:39 AM
"Wasnt there a Federal guy hit by a car late Friday by the Union Artillery camp?"
__________________
William L. Shifflett
4th Va Cav, Co D

Yeah, an older Gentileman was brushed up against with a vehicle at the entrance.. He was not injured but was checked out anyways at the hospital. He returned shortly afterwards and was on the field with his gun the next day.

zouavecampaigner
07-25-2006, 04:06 AM
Our boys had a wonderful time. It was amazing how many participants in the event didn't know what a Fire Zouave was, but it was really nice to see a lot of early war kits, such as the Continental Morgan Guard, the 2nd Rhode Island, and the 69th NY militia. My personal fave moments were the fire zouaves coming to aide the 69th NYSM while shouting "NEW YORK!", tearing our colours from the staff and sending them off the field, charging into the CS line with a clubbed musket and scaring the reb so much he spilled his cartridge, and the cs cav who came over the fence to charge right at us! That put the fear of God in me for a couple seconds, as all I had to defend myself with was a flagpole with brass eagle on top, not even a spearhead! A big thanks to the NR and the 5th NY Zouaves for their hospitality over the weekend, and we're already working on plans for 150th Manassas as well as 145th Gettysburg!

regards,
Shaun

Jari
07-25-2006, 05:07 AM
Shaun

I did enjoy seeing the early war impressions too! My favorite was the US Regulars in dark blue with Hardee Hats but then again, I am partial to them.

Speaking of the Fire Zouaves, I met a reporter from the Washington Post who was looking the them. I guess he found them as he wrote about them in Sunday's edition:

Reenactors Revive Civil War Struggle
Rain Doesn't Stop Anniversary Event
By Nick Miroff
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, July 23, 2006; Page C03

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/07/22/AR2006072200871.html

And another article yesterday:
The South rises again at Battle of Bull Run
Confederates rout Union re-enactors
By Daneesha R. Davis
The Winchester Star

http://www.winchesterstar.com/TheWinchesterStar/060724/Area_south.asp


Jari

RJSamp
07-25-2006, 07:08 AM
"It's one of the fastest-growing hobbies in the country," said Ed Hooper, editor of Camp Chase Gazette, a monthly magazine for Civil War Buffs. Hooper estimates there are 150,000 Civil War reenactors nationwide.

What's he talking about?

rmassella
07-25-2006, 08:15 AM
It was interesting how many people at the reenactment, including many of the participants thought we were serving from a Revolutionary War Regiment, even though we were representing the Continental Morgan Guard (company K) from the 5th Virginia (Stonewall Brigade). We got alot of comments such as "hey George (Washington)", "your at the wrong war", "there are the Rev. War guys". We received many compliments as well. All in all, it was fun to do an accurate impression, that was different from your standard RDII/frock coat, ANV impression.

Respectfully,
Robert Massella
5th VA, Co. K
Continental Morgan Guard

MDConfederate
07-25-2006, 08:23 AM
Don't know what he's talking about. If anything, I'd say Civil War reenacting is shrinking. A few years ago I heard there were about 30,000 Civil War reenactors in the World. Perhaps it depends on one's definition of "Civil War reenactor." I'm guessing that this past Manassas event will be one of the last large event for a few years. Gettysburg seems to be a wreck. There are two Sharpsburg events lining up for 07, both capped at 2,000, so I don't think we will see a BIG Sharpsburg event next year. In the future I'm hoping to focus on quality over quantity.

I'm glad I went to 1st Manassas. It was possibly the best Manassas event that I've seen in 11 years of reenacting. I saw many units trying to develop an early war look. It was more than just a couple of guys hear and there adjusting to an early war look. There appeared to be entire companies and in few cases battalions that went for with a specific Manassas impression. At one point, we saw what appeared to be a whole bunch of Federals, but then we realized they were fighting each other. It must have been a battalion of Federals engaging a battalion of Confederates dressed in blue militia uniforms. I don't know if all these groups got their impressions right, but there seemed to be a good effort. I'm sure there were plenty of people in late war uniforms, but I was so interested in the early war impressions floating around that I really did not notice the late war stuff.

The biggest disappointment that I noticed was the complete lack of casualties on Saturday (I could not stay for the battle on Sunday). I'm sure many people took hits, but they must not have stayed down or made any effort to portray walking or crawling wounded. I counted about 20 casualties in an area where hundreds of troops, perhaps a thousand, had been slugging it out for some time. It was impressive to see the long lines blasting away at each other, but where were all the dead and wounded?

John A. Wyman

nyczouave
07-25-2006, 08:42 AM
Shaun,
It was our pleasure to have you with us. Your impressions were great and all of your guys fell in well prepared to "get dirty" and I believe a fine time was had by all.
Thanks for the effort.
-Charlie

Remise
07-25-2006, 09:11 AM
"It's one of the fastest-growing hobbies in the country," said Ed Hooper, editor of Camp Chase Gazette, a monthly magazine for Civil War Buffs. Hooper estimates there are 150,000 Civil War reenactors nationwide.

What's he talking about?

I think he meant to add, "measured diagonally."

Withal, I went as a spectator with friends, and they enjoyed themselves immensely. In fact, two of them are thinking of getting into the hobby. My non-favorite moment was the idiotic sight of a white pickup, in the middle of the Saturday afternoon battle, driving the length of the Federal lines, delivering ice. If they absolutely had to do that, why could they not have at least gone behind the tree line, and been a wee bit more subtle?

The battalion of Regulars looked pretty good to me, as did several other units, and it seemed that there were more cavalry at this event than any I have been to in a long time. I liked seeing the "33rd Virginia" in their blue uniforms, too, though they were a bit short on numbers, not to mention drill.

It has been several years since I saw a large battle as a spectator, and although we are sometimes deeply embarrassed when on the field, by what we see, my impression was that the bulk of the spectators had a great time, and even if they didn't see something that really resembled a Civil War battle, they did get a chance to think about the Civil War, and I am sure that many of them went home that afternoon expecting to do further research on the subject.

Our mandate is not to entertain, or to role-play. Our mandate -- I think -- is to insure that this nation never forgets the most important four years in its history, and -- relatively speaking -- I think the 145h Manassas served that purpose. As someone's handle here says, though, "your mileage may vary."

B.C. Milligan
Company K, First Penna. Reserves

cwrematchr
07-25-2006, 09:40 AM
I thought the event overall was pretty exciting, though I must say that the hour or more wait on Saturday before the battle was pretty lousy. That and our general said we outnumbered the Yankees 3:2. But other than that, I had fun! Gotta love the rain shower on Saturday, boy did that cool us off!

Sunday was much better in terms of management and scenarios. We were put in reserve with Jackson, though it's the job of the field officers to lead us, not the impersonators. After the two battalions of Confederate Infantry fell back, we were put in after a artillery barrage. I was in the midde of the battleline and we were the ones who went first through the gap in line of trees onto the second field area. There we took on the "Fighting Irish" and the NY Fire Zouaves. This was the most realistic scene in my mind because of the good deal of mayheme. The Zouaves, in their red overshirts/kepis, were scrambling for their flag and the Irish kept reforming and falling back. Here, I also noticed that two other NY Zouaves were pulling back a wounded comrade, a very realistic ordeal.

I also saw Shaun and I guess Marc run straight for our lines, the colors in hand. Then I overheard the Colonel say to take these two prisoners, I dunno if that ever happened.

Well, that's about it, in the words of our Captain, when we were fighting in the field, "HEAD FOR THE CARS!"

roundshot
07-25-2006, 10:06 AM
Probably the best large event I have been to since "THE" Gettysburg in 1988. Excellent representation of early war uniforms on both sides. From the Federal perspective, it was easy to pick out particular units in the CS ranks by their clothing including Wheat's Tigers, 2nd Missisippi, 33rd VA, Liberty Hall Volunteers, & 4th Alabama. Our own unit (The West Point Battery, D/5th US) wore a mix of dragoon and artillery shell jackets as did the original company. In our own Union ranks, the 2nd RI, Regulars, 11th NY, 14th Brooklyn, and Marines were easily discerned. Weather was reasonably cooperative for July, vistas were excellent, and opposing camps well spread out. Saturdays battle particularly was extended and a visual delight. No, nothings perfect, but this was a fun and well run weekend.

Bob Williams
The West Point Battery

bill watson
07-25-2006, 10:26 AM
Nick Miroff did another story last Friday:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/07/20/AR2006072001984.html

He was supposed to be hooking up with CJ Daley and some others, don't know if that happened or not.

Oh, and I have no idea what Ed Hooper is talking about. There must be some circle of reenactors and events numbering in the 100,000 or so none of us has ever heard of.

skamikaze
07-25-2006, 10:28 AM
as a federal, i fully expected to see the majority of our boys go out in the same old gear that they always wear, sack coats and forage caps.

i had a great time checking out all the early war impressions. and there were a lot of good ones too. i wish i could have seen more of the confederate units but i didn't get a chance to. however, the ones i saw were really well done. naturally there were a few idiots who farb things up but one of my favorites was the federal artillery battery who wore full dress shakos on sunday. they looked AWESOME.

i died early on saturday and limped back to camp but i witnessed a great veiw of the union troops retreating. some ran, some tried to maintain order and most came back in groups of one or two. it looked good. i loved coming up over the hill in a drizzle on sat. and right when the sun came out it poured. that was the highlight of my event, coming up in a battle line, hunched forward at trail arms singing battle hymns and seeing an impressive amount of rebs over the crest of the hill.... and an ambulance, but whatever.

i had a good time. hope more events are like this one.

Regular3
07-25-2006, 11:19 AM
Am I the only one who thought the Saturday battle was much too long? I fell out a little after 5 PM, partly because I had to leave anyway but partly because I was running low on water and did not want to make the hike back to camp on empty.

I'm all for realism, and running dry fits that bill, and I'm all for giving both participants and spectators their money's worth ... But with no way to replenish water a nearly 3-hour scenario (when you count the time from the sounding of To the Colors until returning to camp) borders on dangerous. I learned yesterday that fewer than half of the original number in my company was able to answer the call on Sunday.

But that's my only beef ... Well, that and the fact that once again the sutler area was barely visible from the Federal camp :mrgreen:

How did it look when the battalion of Regulars formed the square? That was long after I left but we were very concerned that it go well this time.

VaTrooper
07-25-2006, 11:41 AM
They formed the square quick and looked good doing it. I just wish that we were allowed to get closer to it.

TheSignalCorpsGuy
07-25-2006, 12:21 PM
All,

At First Manassas I was attached to ANV's Signal Detachment.

The ANV General requested that Signals be used to the maximum extent possible to coordinate the scenerio. To that end we had six signal teams on the field. Each detachment had field glasses and the ANV headquarters team had both field glasses and a 30 power telescope.

Well in advance of the battle the planning took place. The scenerio was quite ambitious from the get-go. Signals would play a crucial role in making sure that everything took place when it was supposed to.

Upon arrival Friday evening, the signal unit I belong to contacted the other two CS Signal units and scheduled a practice session for Saturday morning. We went over special addressing and relay code usage as well as went over the scenerio with who was going where and what they would be doing as the scenerio unfolded.

Saturday's battle dragged. Yes - that is correct, but there were reasons which were worked out in the second day's battle. ANY time you put that many people on the field with that ambitious of a Scenerio there's bound to be a few small quirks.

The second day - things happened a bit differently. Bee's and Bartow's Battalions were both starting the battle from the CS right so as not to be delayed.

The only real issue was that on the second day as we advanced with Jackson's brigade the Yankee Artillary directly to our front was loaded. The CS infantry commander would NOT advance on loaded guns and the eschelon advance of the army halted until they could be cleared. Once cleared the advance went quite well.

In all - the battle scenerio was QUITE ambitious - and came out very well. Being that I am "Signal Corps" I am privvy to quite a bit of pre-planning. I have seen events that have had equally as ambitious scenerios but they went south because the lack of the ability for Command and Control once things got started. This time Signals were included form the get-go and we were completely prepared to handle the scenerio and were able to keep it largely on track for the vast majority of the time without having to use walkie-talkies.

I cannot thank EVERYBODY that came to the event enough. I also want to especially thank the ANV Staff for their willingness to use Signal Corps - and thank the 3 signal detachments that came. Signal Corps of the James, Chesapeake Signals, and Longstreet's Signals.

As far as CS signals went - things were GREAT!


Your Obedient Servant,

John E. Schultz

bizzilizzit
07-25-2006, 12:21 PM
How did it look when the battalion of Regulars formed the square? That was long after I left but we were very concerned that it go well this time.

That square was AWESOME! I just happened to be standing in the right place at the right time and got a really good view (and several images) of it. The square was attacked a few times by Rebel Cav and I was really impressed on how tightly organized that group was.
EXCELLENT job to all you guys on the field!

Civilian on the Sidelines
Elizabeth Topping

Catherine Kelly
07-25-2006, 12:34 PM
[QUOTE=Regular3]Am I the only one who thought the Saturday battle was much too long? QUOTE]

No you are not. My husband and one of my kids felt the same as did several in our group. My other son, has worked all summer in the heat and did not seemed to be phased.. However my oldest nearly fell out once back in the camp. which has never happend before. All were well hydrated before going out on the field... My husband also faired well but felt it boarderd on dangerous being out there so long.

MDConfederate
07-25-2006, 12:35 PM
Yep, the battle was pretty long. I wish I had know it was going to be so long or I would have carried more ammo. We were portraying part of Bartow's Brigade. After about the first 45 minutes I was down to about 10 cartridges out of the original 50 that I went in with. At that time some of us charged and the rest retreated. Those that charged were cut down by a nice Federal volley. Wounded, I scurried back to our lines. From there a group of us went back to camp, grabbed the 1st MD colors and joined the 2nd MD, Co. C of the CMF all the way on the other side of the battlefield (we had worked this out before the event). I think they had been in as part of Bee's Brigade and after chewed up and spit out were expected to reorganize and transform into the 1st Maryland. We waited a long time before being able to come in at the very end and fire a few shots. I got to see a lot of the battle and the cavalry attack on the square looked pretty cool. I don't mind a long battle, but I wish I had known ahead of time to bring more ammo. It has been a long time since I completely used up an entire cartridge box of ammo in one battle. My 55 Springfield got a work out, and I'm still cleaning it.

John A. Wyman

Stumpy Jack
07-25-2006, 12:46 PM
Yeah I was the bugler for CMF. After we fell back to that hill we took on the 1st Marylands colors and waited. I thought that Saturdays battle was a lot of fun. But on sunday, we were falling back to that tree line as the 4th Alabama and a hole opened up on our left. I looked back to see a group of 15-20 Federal Cav guys come riding through. First they were in the wrong spot. Second one of the Troopers fired his pistol off in one of our guys ears. Most of the batallion went down except for the color guard and a few other guys. We kinda limped back to behind the Stonewall Brigade and all went our seperate ways. But most of us were done.


Jack Dixon

VaTrooper
07-25-2006, 12:55 PM
Yea it was long. And a lot of people were complaining about how tired their horse was.......well if ya rode the dang thing more than once a month! I'll ride mine for a couple hours everyother day or so, hott or not. If you cant take the heat during the dat late afternoon and night rides are just as good on a horse since things look different. My horse was bored on the picket line while everyone elses was sleeping. So I rode to the Yankee camp, I rode to the store, and I rode to the dance. I put probably 9 hours or saddle time Saturday alone, he barely broke a sweat and never got winded.

blueYankee
07-25-2006, 12:55 PM
Elizabeth, Did you happen to get any pictures of the square? I was observing from Belle Grove and had one eye in the viewfinder of my camera and one eye out...not sure if I caught it. My group was in on the square and would love to see any pictures of it. Blue Yankee

bizzilizzit
07-25-2006, 01:32 PM
Elizabeth, Did you happen to get any pictures of the square? I was observing from Belle Grove and had one eye in the viewfinder of my camera and one eye out...not sure if I caught it. My group was in on the square and would love to see any pictures of it. Blue Yankee

Send me your e-mail address off post and I'll be happy to share my images with you (or anyone else who would like them).
Elizabeth

Julio C. Zangroniz
07-25-2006, 01:43 PM
Ladies and Gentlemen of Szaboland,
I captured many, many photographs of the Battle of First Manassas this weekend, and I expect to post a few HUNDRED of them --yes, including that great square on Sunday and its attack by the Confederate cavalry-- in just another day or so.
Please be patient, as I'm using technology that I'm not thoroughly familiar with and the going is rather slow.
But believe me, your patience *shall* be rewarded.
Julio C. Zangroniz

VaTrooper
07-25-2006, 01:49 PM
Id like to thank everyone thats willing to share their photos! Its awesome to see what happend from other views.

zouavecampaigner
07-25-2006, 02:23 PM
The 69th NYSM and Fire Zous formed a square on the far side of the field, as well, sorta. I think that's what we were, I was too busy tearing the colours from the staff and then using the staff as a club. Talk about feeling inadequate when guys with muskets are advancing on you and you only have 1/2 a flag staff to defend yourself!

Jason, Marc and I went into the CS lines because we SURRENDERED, that's why we had our hands raised in the air and why the flagpole had NO FLAG on it. A large number of the fire zouaves were captured at Manassas, as well as a flagless staff, so it was based on research and historical documentation. We went to the tree line because, well, it was hot as He!! out there and we wanted shade! You have to remember, about 10-12 of us fire zouaves RAN from the area where our battalion fought (which was right at the spectators) ALL THE WAY to the 69th NYSM which was the complete left flank of the Army of Virginia! All I can say it, running down the hill into the lines of the 69th NYSM shouting "NEW YORK!!!" and having them ALL cheer the Fire Zouaves was my "moment" for the weekend!

Regards and salutations,
Shaun "the guy with the eagle shaved in the back of his head" Grenan

Julio C. Zangroniz
07-25-2006, 03:38 PM
Shaun,
I have a nice photograph of that "shaved" eagle... taken when you, your pards and I coincided at Szabo's field studio on Sunday morning.
Rest assured that... it will be posted online for ALL to see...
I think it was a stroke of genius on your part, so, my congratulations!
And wait until you see the images of the Zouaves with their big, bright red flag rushing in to support the 69th NY on the extreme left of the Union line... I thought my hands would be shaking too much to get the picture(s)... but I did!
Julio

redpatch
07-25-2006, 04:42 PM
That was awesome seeing the fire zouaves run over the hill to join our ranks as we portrayed the 69th NYSM. You guys did a great job falling back with us and recreated some events very well. Loved it!

I saw a lot of effort to create early war impressions as well.

Rob Galbraith

Doug Cooper
07-25-2006, 04:58 PM
I did not go, nor did I want to go, but I was hoping to hear that the number showing would approach the number registered for the good of the sutlers and to at least demonstrate that the hobby is not in fact shrinking. The event was billed as the biggest thing since the 135th events with over 8000 registered. Sounds like not more than half that were present. All the conditions were good. Anybody know what happened?

VaTrooper
07-25-2006, 05:55 PM
Doug,
Between the heat, threat of rain, and other excuses we only mounted 6 instead of the normal 12. Disapointing.

Regular3
07-25-2006, 06:05 PM
I did not go, nor did I want to go, but I was hoping to hear that the number showing would approach the number registered for the good of the sutlers and to at least demonstrate that the hobby is not in fact shrinking. The event was billed as the biggest thing since the 135th events with over 8000 registered. Sounds like not more than half that were present. All the conditions were good. Anybody know what happened?
That's a good question. We had only one no-show out of 20 and in fact picked up two privates we had not counted upon so we actually came out one ahead, but one of our brother units of Regulars that had 15 registered only the captain and two soldiers showed up - and the two soldiers did not even stay for the Saturday battle and so the captain took command of a combined company that had no officer, and fought on another part of the field.

Regular3
07-26-2006, 07:20 PM
The Confederates in the sky blue overshirts? They stood out, as easily identifiable as the First Minnesota or the Fire Zouaves or the Regulars.

Whoever you were, I salute you for an excellent impression.

Doug Cooper
07-26-2006, 07:21 PM
Doug,
Between the heat, threat of rain, and other excuses we only mounted 6 instead of the normal 12. Disapointing.

Hmm - so you guys were at 50% which sounds like it was a bit better than the whole. Any numbers available from the organizers?

Question - what type of the registration system was in place - by individual or by unit?

VaTrooper
07-26-2006, 08:33 PM
We registered individualy. The pre-registration info was passed out at our last event. If I had to guess Id say there was 200 mounted this weekend.

Regular3
07-27-2006, 07:26 AM
Any numbers available from the organizers?

Question - what type of the registration system was in place - by individual or by unit?
The organizers told the Washington Post they were "expecting" 7,000. I haven't seen any figure of how many actually showed up.

Registration was available both by unit and individual - We registered as a company. Folks who registered as individuals were supposed to receive their medallion and parking pass ahead of time and so bypass check-in and I assume they pulled it off successfully, but even for those of us who did have to visit the tent off I-81 it went very smoothly.

As far as organization goes, I didn't hear a single complaint about registration, parking, or the wood-water-straw-potty amenities.

Historicaly Correct
07-27-2006, 04:24 PM
Hello,
The reenactment at Cedar Creek (Bull Run/ 1st Manassas) was a spectcular event. I am new to the world of reenacting, and was quite impressed.
The weather was hot and it rained saturday during the battle (boy it felt good though) but I thought it went smothly. I was in the advanced artillery in the middle of the field and was privaledged to see the battle close up.
I must say I felt a great sence of pride to portray a CW solider an the battle field those 2 days.
HC

Ken
07-27-2006, 05:31 PM
To bad the horse didn't stomp the crap out of the guy. That would have been poetic justice.

Pvt_Idaho
07-27-2006, 06:47 PM
All,

I was in the line of Confederate artillery on the ridge behind Heater House. Aside from the columns of Confederate infantry on their march outward to begin the battle, I did not see very much of the reenactment at all. The battle was way out in the distance behind the next ridge and tree line. Those Confederates I did see as they marched out looked splendid in their varied early war attire. I am eager to see photographs of what I missed which was basically everything save for Confederate artillery.

Thanks for sharing them,

"Doc" Scanlan

Hondo
07-28-2006, 05:43 AM
The boys in the sky blue battleshirts was the 47th Virginia (Longstreet's Corps).

Jozar
07-30-2006, 10:29 AM
Interesting topic, since I find this battle the most in interesting of the whole CW.

Can anyone who was present at this reenactment please give some detailed descriptions or post a picture of what the 33d Virginia wore at this reeanactment, and if known what company was this ? ( headgear, colour trim etc and what kind of coat and equipment etc ).

Was the 27th Va infantry also present ? and if so please the same for this.

Many thanks in advance, and best wishes,

Johan Heitzer
The Netherlands