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TheColorBearer
09-10-2008, 09:56 AM
Hello


My 9 year old son is seeking out how to play the drum. The youngest member of the ACW was a 9 year old drummer from Delphos,Ohio, my son being the same age and from the same place wants to learn how to play. Any guidance or tips would be welcomed.

I have enrolled him into 1/2 hour lessons with a local instructor and made him a practice pad. The local instructor will be able to teach him how to read the notes, and I was looking to gain my son information from all aspects so that he has full knowledge of the drum, after all the more there is available to more you can learn.


Any help would greatly be appreciated.


Thank you


Todd & Ben Burnett

Charles Weathers
09-10-2008, 11:01 AM
I would reccommend one hour lessons. And make sure he learns to READ the music, not just play by ear! Make him practice every night, even if it drives you and him crazy. Eventually have him learn other percussion instruments (your current teacher should be able to do that), it will be a great benefit in Jr. high and high school, especially if he wants to be in band (scholarships, you know!!)

By the time I was a senior in high school my mom was begging me to stop practicing because I would practice for hours late in to the night! :rolleyes: Of course, that was the year I made All-State Band!! :cool:

TheColorBearer
09-10-2008, 12:42 PM
I would reccommend one hour lessons. And make sure he learns to READ the music, not just play by ear! Make him practice every night, even if it drives you and him crazy. Eventually have him learn other percussion instruments (your current teacher should be able to do that), it will be a great benefit in Jr. high and high school, especially if he wants to be in band (scholarships, you know!!)

By the time I was a senior in high school my mom was begging me to stop practicing because I would practice for hours late in to the night! :rolleyes: Of course, that was the year I made All-State Band!! :cool:


Thank you for your response sir the information you have given is noted. I made him a practice pad out of a piece of wood and a 1/4" think piece of rubber laid over top.

Charles Weathers
09-10-2008, 02:47 PM
That's a great start. Now the work starts for saving up for the real thing! :rolleyes:

Oh, and makes sure he uses correct technique. A lot of younger kids will let the technique go in place of just hitting the drum.

TheColorBearer
09-11-2008, 01:46 AM
That's a great start. Now the work starts for saving up for the real thing! :rolleyes:

Oh, and makes sure he uses correct technique. A lot of younger kids will let the technique go in place of just hitting the drum.


I have a customer who has a drum and the customer is requesting a ANV Battleflag so I may be able to play let's make a deal since the customer has no use for the drum.


My son takes the drum very seriously. I got to see the instructor in action tonight with some 3rd graders and they were really good, so the outlook is awesome and my son's determination is at a high level.

Any idea's on recored music that we can play would be also greatly appreciated.

captain_kirk
09-11-2008, 09:29 PM
Regarding your son, you have received good advice, however make sure that he is using the correct sticks for his size and age not those huge "log-rollers". A practice pad is very useful for learning, not to mention keeping mom and dad from a nervous breakdown. The modern pads react to the sticks similar to modern marching snare drums that have rock hard heads. Playing a peroid rope tension is a quite different ball game. I would start him off with a concert snare, you can pick one up fairly cheaply on e-bay and let him learn and then move him to rope tension. You will need a stand for the concert snare. I am at present training some drummers and have cut some simple cadances in my basement studio. If you would send me your address via a PM, I will give you a CD for him to listen to.

Kirk Fuller
18th Ala

billtyrell
09-11-2008, 10:28 PM
I went through the same thing with my son at that age. You can get the books with the different cadences etc. and song books. There is "The Drummer's and Fifer's guide by George B. Bruce and Dan D. Emmett" which we bought from a sutler. Your drumming instructor should be able to help you if you take him the books. If your unit is in one of the larger umbrella groups, (we were in the National Regiment) they should be able to help as well with weekend camps of instruction. I found that this really helped him gain the confidence to play even on his own at smaller local events were he could play the different camp calls etc. Good luck with it, just watch out when he gets to be 16 he may want to carry a musket.

Dave Ward
116th Pa.

5strings
09-11-2008, 11:19 PM
Todd and Ben,

Although these two events are over for the year, you may want to consider them for next year. There are two great Musician's Schools that occur here on the East Coast, one is at Pamplin Park, Va. and the other is a Fort Delaware. They cater to the young musicians and are well staffed and from what I hear they are a great weekend for the students.

I think both of these events are in June and the sponsors usually begin posting on these forums to give you plenty of time to register. I hope this helps.

TheColorBearer
09-12-2008, 01:38 AM
Regarding your son, you have received good advice, however make sure that he is using the correct sticks for his size and age not those huge "log-rollers". A practice pad is very useful for learning, not to mention keeping mom and dad from a nervous breakdown. The modern pads react to the sticks similar to modern marching snare drums that have rock hard heads. Playing a peroid rope tension is a quite different ball game. I would start him off with a concert snare, you can pick one up fairly cheaply on e-bay and let him learn and then move him to rope tension. You will need a stand for the concert snare. I am at present training some drummers and have cut some simple cadances in my basement studio. If you would send me your address via a PM, I will give you a CD for him to listen to.

Kirk Fuller
18th Ala

No problem sir. PM sent

TheColorBearer
09-12-2008, 01:43 AM
Good luck with it, just watch out when he gets to be 16 he may want to carry a musket.

Dave Ward
116th Pa.


thanks for the advice, from all who gave.

I have been reading a story about a 10 year old drummer boy from Newark,Ohio who tagged along with a michigan Regiment and they gave him a cut down version of a musket. In the story it says that once while retreating in Tenn. a confederate officer rode up and demanded the wagon surrender when the young drummer boy shot him in the chest.

5strings
09-13-2008, 09:03 PM
I picked up this flyer today in Gettysburg:

Civil War Musician announcing: The Don Hubbard Field Music School

June 5-7, 2009 at Fort Delaware (Delaware City, De.)

Quality Musicians are Authentic

Learn the Proper Role of Civil War Field Musicians-Improve your Playing-

Enhance your Military Impression-For more information:

www.FieldMusicSchool.com

RWelker
09-14-2008, 03:09 PM
thanks for the advice, from all who gave.

I have been reading a story about a 10 year old drummer boy from Newark,Ohio who tagged along with a michigan Regiment and they gave him a cut down version of a musket. In the story it says that once while retreating in Tenn. a confederate officer rode up and demanded the wagon surrender when the young drummer boy shot him in the chest.

What was that boy's name? My particular interest is in underage soldiers during the war, many of whom were musicians. I'd love to read about that kid... what a neat story!

To the original poster, you meantioned that the youngest participant in the war was a 9 year old from Delphos, Ohio- what was his name? I believe I've heard of him but my main resource is in transit from overseas...

Infantry Bugler
09-14-2008, 07:25 PM
What was that boy's name? My particular interest is in underage soldiers during the war, many of whom were musicians. I'd love to read about that kid... what a neat story!

To the original poster, you meantioned that the youngest participant in the war was a 9 year old from Delphos, Ohio- what was his name? I believe I've heard of him but my main resource is in transit from overseas...

The drummer from Newark, Ohio was John Clem (a.k.a. Johnny Shiloh;) ) of the 22nd Michigan.

As for the 9-year-old from Delphos, Ohio- his name was Avery Brown, Jr., of the 31st Ohio Infantry, Company C.

RWelker
09-15-2008, 05:50 PM
The drummer from Newark, Ohio was John Clem (a.k.a. Johnny Shiloh;) ) of the 22nd Michigan.

As for the 9-year-old from Delphos, Ohio- his name was Avery Brown, Jr., of the 31st Ohio Infantry, Company C.

Wow, i really should have caught that first reference. I'll cut my losses and not try to blame college for tiring out my brain cells.

I've heared of Avery Brown, as well, but as I recall his credentials are somewhat in doubt. Unfortunately, as I said, my favorite reference is an ocean away, so I'll not pass judgement without the relevant research.

I can say, however, that there was no Johnny Shiloh... John Clem is an interesting historical figure, but he wasn't anywhere near Shiloh. Debunking that myth is a personal interest.

madisontigers
09-16-2008, 06:18 PM
Great to see a young person seeking the role of a musician. I am also a drummer, and have truly enjoyed the musical spect of the hobby. Drum lessons, no doubt, will play an integral role in the development of your sons percussion abilities. However, don't don't forget that the 'actual playing' is only one aspect of civil war drumming. I would also suggest that your son, after learning the basic rudiments, find a way to practice marching with a drum. This( marching w/ drum) was the most difficult part for of the learning process for me.

Cove Rebel
10-15-2008, 12:08 PM
Regarding your son, you have received good advice, however make sure that he is using the correct sticks for his size and age not those huge "log-rollers". A practice pad is very useful for learning, not to mention keeping mom and dad from a nervous breakdown. The modern pads react to the sticks similar to modern marching snare drums that have rock hard heads. Playing a peroid rope tension is a quite different ball game. I would start him off with a concert snare, you can pick one up fairly cheaply on e-bay and let him learn and then move him to rope tension. You will need a stand for the concert snare. I am at present training some drummers and have cut some simple cadances in my basement studio. If you would send me your address via a PM, I will give you a CD for him to listen to.

Kirk Fuller
18th Ala

Kirk,

I saw your post on the CDs. My son is also considering being a drummer with the 19th Alabama. I have received some advice from a gentleman in the Olde Towne Brass on pad and such. My question to you is, can I get or purchase a CD from you as well?

Russ Spry

33rdaladrummer
10-15-2008, 09:04 PM
Sir,

My advice to you is to find a drummer who can teach rudimental drumming. The foundation of 19th century drumming is based on the "rudiments", the most important of which being the long roll, which consists of two beats from the left hand followed by two beats with the right hand, repeated, increasing in speed, until a "closed" even roll is obtained. This and the other rudiments of drumming such as the paradiddle, 7 stroke roll, and the flam are essential to effectively serving as a military drummer. Gaining proficiency in the rudiments requires much practice. If your son really wants to learn the old style of drumming, he will only be sucessful if he practices his rudiments diligently. Any of the period manuals (Hart, Howe, Keach, Bruce-Emmett) will be sufficient in explaining the rudiments. Check out www.nationalfieldmusicschool.com and wwwm.fifedrum.org for free period drum music.


Will Chappell, drummer

33rd Alabama 1989-2008
Liberty Hall 2006-2008

33rdaladrummer
10-15-2008, 10:53 PM
Got the links wrong...

www.nationalcivilwarfieldmusicschool.com

www.fifedrum.org

Cove Rebel
10-16-2008, 09:44 AM
Rudiments? You mean like chewing cud?!! (oh wait, that's ruminants...)

Thanks Will. I know you know what you are talking about having served in the field with you guys...and been annoyed at you early morning playing at Selma after a night at the Stomp. :D

MarkL
12-29-2009, 12:07 AM
I would like to add that the purchase of a quality metronome is a absolute priority if you want to learn snare drum music. Vick Firth has a exelent web site for beginning drummers.

zouavebugler
12-29-2009, 08:00 AM
The most important aspect of learning to drum is understanding the 26 basic rudiments of drumming. Your son's instructor should be teaching the rudiments to your son as the use of the rudiments in various combinations is what drumming is all about; i.e. rolls, paradiddles, flams, etc. As stated in an earlier post, reading the music is also very important.

Doug Grunn
Chief Bugler, Mifflin Guard
Principal Musician, Mifflin Guard Field Music
Drum Major, Band Master, Mifflin Guard Regimental Band

33rdaladrummer
12-29-2009, 02:36 PM
The most important aspect of learning to drum is understanding the 26 basic rudiments of drumming.

Except the 26 rudiments weren't established until 1933 and some of them are different than the rudiments used in the war.

Will Chappell

MarkL
12-31-2009, 12:12 AM
Now there are 40 drum rudements.

Silas
12-31-2009, 12:29 AM
That child better start learning to drum now before someone creates even more rudements.

CapitolGuards
01-04-2010, 12:42 PM
Great to see a young person seeking the role of a musician. I am also a drummer, and have truly enjoyed the musical spect of the hobby. Drum lessons, no doubt, will play an integral role in the development of your sons percussion abilities. However, don't don't forget that the 'actual playing' is only one aspect of civil war drumming. I would also suggest that your son, after learning the basic rudiments, find a way to practice marching with a drum. This( marching w/ drum) was the most difficult part for of the learning process for me.

While it hasn't been mentioned yet, one of the essential skills for military drumming is learning the rudiments (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudiment)... Nearly all the camp calls and cadences stem from these.

blueYankee
01-05-2010, 12:39 PM
Sir... both my sons started off in our unit as drummers...
They started drumming at age 7yrs with a local drum corps, which offered free lessons in return for the boys time of parading with the corps. When they began reenacting, they went into what we up here in CT call an Ancient Corps which played more period music and beat.
Check in your area... it is well worth what your son would get out of it.
And when he is old enough, send him to the Don Hubbard Field musican school at Ft. Delaware or the National field musican school at Pamplin Park. Again, well worth it!
Both my sons and nephew attended the Don Hubbard school at 12yrs old and at 22 yrs old, they still talk of it.
Blue Yankee

RJSamp
01-06-2010, 09:44 AM
Now there are 40 drum rudements.

Correct, and now we have electric guitars and keyboard synthesizers, etc.

To drum in an ACW period style, one must learn the rudiments as set forth in the 18th-19th century manuals....and you don't have to learn how to beat Wipe Out or Anna Godda Davida, double bass pedals, a trap set.....or 40 modern snare drum rudiments.

Old Man Ludwig himself used to visit area school bands.....he could beat out Three Camps like no one's business using the OLD rudiments... Three Camps and Downfall of Paris still used in snare drum competitions to this day.

Now if we just had more percussionists in ACW reenacting.....

33rdaladrummer
01-06-2010, 02:20 PM
Old Man Ludwig himself used to visit area school bands.....he could beat out Three Camps like no one's business using the OLD rudiments... Three Camps and Downfall of Paris still used in snare drum competitions to this day.


And William Ludwig was among the founders of National Association of Rudimental Drummers (NARD), a bunch of a drum and bugle guys who "rediscovered" the drumming style of the old drum and fife corps and "standardized" it with the 26 rudiments, completely destroying the variety of styles from the 1800s. By that time the only records of old style drumming that anyone paid attention to were Bruce-Emmett and Strube, and the NARD stripped it down further in 1933 when they made their gold standard the inferior Strube system from 1869. That is where the 26 rudiments came from. Compare Ludwig's 3 Camps and Downfall of Paris to Bruce and Emmett, Hart, and the other pre 1866 manuals and you will see some differences.

I wouldn't pay any attention to any drum book or method published after 1865. One of the greatest drummers and drum teachers of all time, Sanford "Gus" Moeller, who used to go to the old soldiers' homes and bring bags of tobacco and pick the brains of the old Civil War veteran drummers, did not think too highly of the NARD.

Will Chappell
Liberty Hall Fifes and Drums

MarkL
01-06-2010, 06:04 PM
Ya,40 rudiments is over kill I think.I read somewhere that they were going back to the 26 rudiments.I myself havent played for twenty years now.So im out of touch with drumming now,arthritis.But no one can play in any kind of band without being in time.Thats why I think anybody who wants to be a quality drummer must use a metonome.If they had it,or something like it in the 1860's, I dont know?

33rdaladrummer
01-06-2010, 08:40 PM
If you put together all the different basic rudiments and the different variations in accents and sticking from these manuals, then you probably will find more than 40, definitely more than 26:

ELIAS HOWE - BOSTON 1862 "HOWE'S US REGULATION DRUM & FIFE INSTRUCTOR"
KEACH, BURDITT & CASSIDY - BOSTON 1861 "ARMY FIFE & DRUM BOOK"
BRUCE AND EMMETT - NEW YORK 1862 "THE DRUMMER AND FIFER'S GUIDE"
COL. H. C. HART - NEW YORK 1862 "NEW & IMPROVED INSTRUCTOR FOR THE DRUM"
SIMPSON & CANTERBURY - BOSTON 1862 “UNION DRUM & FIFE BOOK”
WILLIAM NEVINS - CHICAGO 1864 "ARMY REGULATIONS FOR THE DRUM, FIFE & BUGLE"

Will Chappell

eric marten
01-07-2010, 08:42 AM
Anyone interested in a quality metronome for free (for practice only)- can go online to Metronome Online (google it). But please , practice only - I don't want to get blamed for someone carrying their laptop out into the field. (Note, the tuning "A" also on the website is modern 20th century pitch).

Eric Marten

MarkL
01-07-2010, 11:32 AM
I dont think you have to learn any drum rudiments to play In-a-Gadda-da-vida.With my respect's.

RJSamp
01-08-2010, 08:27 AM
Anyone interested in a quality metronome for free (for practice only)- can go online to Metronome Online (google it). But please , practice only - I don't want to get blamed for someone carrying their laptop out into the field. (Note, the tuning "A" also on the website is modern 20th century pitch).

Eric Marten

Good point!
Our bugles and brass band tune to A=450

Anita
01-18-2010, 09:56 PM
What was that boy's name? My particular interest is in underage soldiers during the war, many of whom were musicians. I'd love to read about that kid... what a neat story!

To the original poster, you meantioned that the youngest participant in the war was a 9 year old from Delphos, Ohio- what was his name? I believe I've heard of him but my main resource is in transit from overseas...

I believe that was Johnny Clem, drummer boy of Shiloh. Disney made a tv movie on him back in the early 60s with Brian Keith and Kevin Corcoran. I forgot the unit he was with. He later went on to become a BG in the Army.

Anita L. Henderson
Atlantic Guard Soldiers' Aid Society www.agsas.org-Cook
13th Va Cavalry, Co. H., Light Sussex Dragoons-Bugler
Novice drummer

FloridaHoosier
01-18-2010, 10:50 PM
I believe that was Johnny Clem, drummer boy of Shiloh. Disney made a tv movie on him back in the early 60s with Brian Keith and Kevin Corcoran. I forgot the unit he was with. He later went on to become a BG in the Army.

Anita L. Henderson
Atlantic Guard Soldiers' Aid Society www.agsas.org-Cook
13th Va Cavalry, Co. H., Light Sussex Dragoons-Bugler
Novice drummer

Please refer to post #13 of this thread where that query was previously answered.